Solly Hemus

Solomon Joseph Hemus (April 17, 1923 – October 2, 2017), was an American professional baseball infielder, manager, and coach, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies.[1] Hemus is one of a select group of big league players to have held a dual role as a player-manager.

Solly Hemus
Solly Hemus 1953
Hemus in about 1953
Shortstop / Second baseman / Manager
Born: April 17, 1923
Phoenix, Arizona
Died: October 2, 2017 (aged 94)
Houston, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 27, 1949, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
June 14, 1959, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.273
Home runs51
Runs batted in263
Managerial record190–192
Winning %.497
Teams
As player
As manager
As coach

Baseball career

As a player (1949–1959) with the St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies, Hemus was primarily a shortstop, although he also saw significant time as a second baseman. Hemus compiled a lifetime batting average of .273 in 961 games and collected 736 hits, with 51 home runs. The Phoenix native batted left-handed and threw right-handed. During his playing days, Hemus stood 5 feet 9 inches (1.75 m) tall, weighing 165 pounds (75 kg).[1]

Hemus was a hard-nosed player and manager known for battling with opponents and umpires; he was ejected 30 times between 1952 and 1965.[2] When he was traded to the Phillies in May 1956, Hemus wrote a letter to Cardinals owner August "Gussie" Busch, expressing his pride in being a Cardinal and his gratitude to the baseball club. Nearing the end of his playing career, he was reacquired by the Cardinals on September 29, 1958 — one day after the 1958 season ended — and named the St. Louis player-manager by Busch, who admired Hemus' fiery personality and remembered his letter from 2½ years before.[3]

As a player in 1959, Hemus appeared in 24 games — mostly as a pinch-hitter — before concentrating on his managerial responsibilities. His Cardinals were inconsistent. Hemus' first club lost 15 of its first 20 games and stumbled to a seventh place (71–83) finish in 1959. That was followed by a 15-game improvement (86–68) and a leap to third place in his second season (1960).[1] The Redbirds followed with a mediocre start in 1961 and were mired in sixth place on July 5 (at 33–41), when Hemus was replaced by one of his coaches, Johnny Keane.[4] His career managing record was 190–192 (.497).[1] He was thrown out of 11 of the 382 games he managed, comprising over one-third of his career MLB ejections.[2]

Hemus then served as a coach with the New York Mets (1962–1963) and Cleveland Indians (1964–1965). He was on manager Casey Stengel's coaching staff when the 1962 Mets expansion team ended up with a record of 40–120, still the most losses by a Major League team in a single season since the nineteenth century.[5][6][7][8] He managed the Mets' top farm club, the Jacksonville Suns of the Triple-A International League,[9] in 1966, before leaving baseball and entering the oil business in his adopted home city of Houston, Texas.[10]

During his tenure in Philadelphia, Hemus made history when he was removed for pinch runner John Kennedy at Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City, New Jersey, during a league game against the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 22, 1957. It marked the Major League debut of Kennedy, the first African-American player in the Phillies' history.[11][12] In 2011, Hall-of-Famer Bob Gibson indicated that racial prejudice on Hemus' part had intruded on his later role as the Cards' manager when Hemus disparaged both Gibson and teammate Curt Flood by telling them they were not good enough to make it as Major Leaguers and should try something else.[13][14] Hemus' replacement, Keane, was a Gibson supporter who had managed the pitcher in the minor leagues.[15]

Death

Hemus died at 94 following a long illness in Houston, on October 2, 2017.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Solly Hemus Stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 2019. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Retrosheet
  3. ^ "Solly Hemus Given Raise in 1961 St. Louis Contract". The Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. September 23, 1960. p. 26. Retrieved August 28, 2011.
  4. ^ 1961 St. Louis Cardinals Schedule, Box Scores and Splits at Baseball-Reference.com
  5. ^ Sheehan, Joe (October 3, 1961). "Mets Appoint Lavagetto and Hemus Coaches as Stengel Returns". The New York Times. p. 48.
  6. ^ "Mets Bank On Return Of Stengel". Hartford Courant. Associated Press. October 11, 1963. p. 21.
  7. ^ Loomis, Tom (April 6, 1964). "Hot Seat Won't Burn Strickland". Toledo Blade. p. 19. Retrieved August 31, 2011.
  8. ^ "Dick Sisler Gets Post With Cards". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. October 20, 1965. p. 26. Retrieved August 31, 2011.
  9. ^ "Former Mets Named to New Jobs". The New York Times. Associated Press. January 4, 1966.
  10. ^ Anderson, Dave (March 28, 1982). "World of baseball hasn't forgotten Ken Boyer". St. Petersburg Times. p. 4C.
  11. ^ "Phillies Find New Shortstop". Star-News. Associated Press. 26 March 1957. p. 1.
  12. ^ Brooklyn Dodgers 5, Philadelphia Phillies 1 Retrosheet Boxscore and Play-by-Play for April 22, 1957
  13. ^ a b "Solly Hemus, last Cardinals player-manager, dies at 94". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. October 3, 2017.
  14. ^ "HBO: The Curious Case of Curt Flood". Home Box Office, Inc. Archived from the original on 2 September 2011. Retrieved 1 October 2011.
  15. ^ Gibson, Bob; Wheeler, Lonnie (1994). Stranger to the Game. New York: Viking. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-670-84794-5.

External links

Preceded by
Franchise created
New York Mets third-base coach
1962–1963
Succeeded by
Don Heffner
Preceded by
George Strickland
Cleveland Indians third-base coach
1964
Succeeded by
George Strickland
Preceded by
Elmer Valo
Cleveland Indians first-base coach
1965
Succeeded by
Reggie Otero
Preceded by
Grover Resinger
Jacksonville Suns manager
1966
Succeeded by
Bill Virdon
1946 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1946 St. Louis Cardinals season was a season in American baseball. It was the team's 65th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 55th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 96–58 during the championship season and finished tied with the Brooklyn Dodgers for first in the National League. St. Louis then won a best-of-three playoff for the pennant, 2 games to none. In the World Series, they won in 7 games over the Boston Red Sox. They won on Enos Slaughter's "mad dash" that gave them a 4–3 lead in the 8th inning of game 7.

1949 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1949 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 68th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 58th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 96–58 during the season and finished second in the National League.

1950 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1950 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 69th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 59th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 78–75 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1951 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1951 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 70th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 60th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 81–73 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League.

1954 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1954 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 73rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 63rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–82 during the season and finished 6th in the National League.

1956 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1956 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 75th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 65th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 76–78 during the season and finished 4th in the National League.

1958 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1958 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 76th in franchise history. The Phillies finished the season in last place in the National League. It was the Phillies third losing season in five seasons, and their fourth losing season during the 1950s.

1958 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1958 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 77th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 67th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–82 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1959 Major League Baseball season

The 1959 Major League Baseball season was played from April 9 to October 9, 1959. It saw the Los Angeles Dodgers, free of the strife produced by their move from Brooklyn the previous season, rebound to win the National League pennant after a two-game playoff against the Milwaukee Braves, who themselves had moved from Boston in 1953. The Dodgers won the World Series against a Chicago White Sox team that had not played in the "Fall Classic" since 1919 and was interrupting a Yankees' dynasty that dominated the American League between 1949 and 1964.

The season is notable as the only one between 1950 and 1981 where no pitcher pitched a no-hitter.

1959 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1959 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 78th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 68th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 71–83 during the season and finished seventh in the National League, 16 games behind the NL pennant winner and World Champion Los Angeles Dodgers. They attracted 929,953 paying fans to Busch Stadium, fifth in the eight-team league.

1960 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1960 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 79th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 69th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 86–68 during the season, a fifteen-game improvement over the previous season, and finished third in the National League, nine games behind the World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates.

1961 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1961 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 80th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 70th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 80–74 during the season and finished fifth in the National League. It was the last season before the NL went to a 162-game schedule the following season to adjust for the new ten-team league.

1966 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1966 followed the system introduced for even-number years in 1956.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players with provision for a second, "runoff" election in case of no winner. Ted Williams tallied more than 90% on the first ballot.

Meanwhile, the Veterans Committee was meeting annually to consider executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

It selected Casey Stengel.

Cal Howe

Calvin Earl Howe (November 27, 1924 – May 5, 2008) was an American professional baseball player who appeared in one game in Major League Baseball as a relief pitcher for the Chicago Cubs during the 1952 season. Listed at 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) and 230 pounds (100 kg), Howe batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Rock Falls, Illinois.

In his one relief appearance, on September 26, 1952, against the St. Louis Cardinals at Sportsman's Park, Howe posted a perfect 0.00 ERA without a decision or save, giving up one walk (to Solly Hemus), while striking out two (Dick Sisler and Gerry Staley) in two hitless innings of work.Howe's minor league career lasted for eleven seasons (1942; 1948–1957); he won 99 games (losing 70) and posted a 3.49 ERA in 1,337 innings pitched.

John Kennedy (shortstop)

John Irvin Kennedy (October 12, 1926 – April 27, 1998) was an American professional baseball shortstop. He signed as a free agent with the New York Giants in Major League Baseball (MLB) before the 1953 season, but was released prior to the 1954 season. Kennedy caught on with the Birmingham Black Barons, and later the Kansas City Monarchs, both of the Negro American League. Near the end of the 1956 season, with Kennedy having led the NAL batting race for most of the year, the Monarchs sold his contract to the Philadelphia Phillies.

When Kennedy made his big league debut (April 22, 1957 at Roosevelt Stadium), he became the first black player in Phillies history. The game was exactly 10 years to the day after manager Ben Chapman's Phillies had so taunted rookie Jackie Robinson in Brooklyn. Playing against the Brooklyn Dodgers, Kennedy entered the game in the top of the 8th inning as a pinch runner for Solly Hemus, who had doubled, but he did not score. The Dodgers won, 5-1.

Kennedy's next game was two days later, playing against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Connie Mack Stadium. He entered the game in the bottom of the 6th as a pinch runner for Harry Anderson, who had singled, and later scored on a bases-loaded triple by Ed Bouchee. The Phillies won, 8-5.

Kennedy got into a total of just five games, the last one on May 3, 1957. At the plate, he was 0-for-2, including one strikeout. In his two appearances at shortstop he had one assist, one error, and participated in one double play.

Scotty Robb

Douglas Walker "Scotty" Robb (September 23, 1908 – April 10, 1969) was a professional baseball umpire who worked for in the National League from 1947 to 1952, and the American League in 1952 and 1953.

In 1936, Robb was initially a student in the George Barr Umpire School held at Whittington Park in Hot Springs, Arkansas and operated by Major League Umpire George Barr.On August 29, 1947, Robb joined the National League. Robb was an umpire in the 1950 and 1951 Major League Baseball All-Star Games. In his career, he umpired 869 Major League games. He was the home plate umpire for Virgil Trucks no-hitter on August 25, 1952.In 1952, Robb was fined and suspended by National League President Warren Giles for an April 22 incident with player Solly Hemus. Robb paid the fine then resigned. Two days later he was offered a job by American League President Will Harridge, which he accepted. Robb, therefore, became one of the few umpires to work in both leagues. On June 28, 1953, Robb retired to work in his printing business.

Tom Hughes (1950s pitcher)

Thomas Edward Hughes (born September 13, 1934) is a retired American professional baseball player who appeared in two games for the 1959 St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball. Born in Ancón, Panama Canal Zone, the son of a police official working in the then-American-controlled Canal Zone territory, Hughes was a right-handed pitcher who batted left-handed and was listed as 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and 180 pounds (82 kg). He signed with the Cardinals in 1954.

As a minor league pitcher, Hughes posted gaudy win–loss records during his early career, winning 52 of 68 decisions (.765) between 1955 and 1957 for teams in the Class C California League and the Double-A Texas League. He led the California League in strikeouts with 273 and won 20 games during 1955. But he was treated late in 1956 for elbow soreness, then missed the entire 1958 campaign and almost all of 1959 while serving in the United States Army.Upon his discharge in August 1959, Hughes was added to the Cardinals' expanded roster that September. With the Redbirds languishing in the second division, manager Solly Hemus gave the rookie two auditions as a starting pitcher, with both games against the Chicago Cubs. On September 13, his 25th birthday, at Wrigley Field, Hughes lasted into the third inning, but allowed five earned runs on five hits (including home runs by Ernie Banks and Irv Noren) and two bases on balls, and was tagged with the 8–0 defeat. Eight days later, at Busch Stadium, Hughes retired only four batters, and was charged with surrendering four hits and four earned runs. He again was charged with a loss, as Chicago went on to win, 12–3.In 1960, Hughes returned to the minor leagues and spent two more seasons in the Cardinal organization before retiring from pro baseball. In his two MLB games, he allowed a total of nine hits and nine earned runs in four full innings pitched, for an earned run average of 15.75. He struck out two and issued two bases on balls.

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