Solar eclipse of July 11, 1991

A total solar eclipse occurred on July 11, 1991. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometres wide. Totality began over the Pacific Ocean and Hawaii moving across Mexico, down through Central America and across South America ending over Brazil. It lasted for 6 minutes and 53 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. There will not be a longer total eclipse until June 13, 2132.

This eclipse was the most central total eclipse in 800 years, with a gamma of -.0041. There will not be a more central eclipse for another 800 years. Its magnitude was also greater than any eclipse since the 6th century.

Solar eclipse of July 11, 1991
Eclipse CR 1991 a zoom
Totality from Playas del Coco, Costa Rica
SE1991Jul11T
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureTotal
Gamma-0.0041
Magnitude1.08
Maximum eclipse
Duration413 sec (6 m 53 s)
Coordinates22°00′N 105°12′W / 22°N 105.2°W
Max. width of band258 km (160 mi)
Times (UTC)
(P1) Partial begin16:28:46
(U1) Total begin17:21:41
Greatest eclipse19:07:01
(U4) Total end20:50:28
(P4) Partial end21:43:24
References
Saros136 (36 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000)9489

Observations

SE1991Jul11T

Animation of eclipse path

Eclipse CR 1991 b zoom

View near the end of totality, Playas del Coco, Guanacaste, Costa Rica

Eclipse CR 1991 c zoom

Partial phase before totality as seen through the cloud cover, Playas del Coco, Guanacaste, Costa Rica

Related eclipses

Solar eclipses 1990-1992

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

Solar eclipse series sets from 1990–1992
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Saros Map
121 January 26, 1990
SE1990Jan26A
Annular
126 July 22, 1990
SE1990Jul22T
Total
131 January 15, 1991
SE1991Jan15A
Annular
136
Eclipse CR 1991 a zoom
From Playas del Coco
July 11, 1991
SE1991Jul11T
Total
141 January 4, 1992
SE1992Jan04A
Annular
146 June 30, 1992
SE1992Jun30T
Total
151 December 24, 1992
SE1992Dec24P
Partial

Saros 136

Solar Saros 136, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, contains 71 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on June 14, 1360, and reached a first annular eclipse on September 8, 1504. It was a hybrid event from November 22, 1612, through January 17, 1703, and total eclipses from January 27, 1721 through May 13, 2496. The series ends at member 71 as a partial eclipse on July 30, 2622, with the entire series lasting 1262 years. The longest eclipse occurred on June 20, 1955, with a maximum duration of totality at 7 minutes, 8 seconds.[2]

Series members 29–43 occur between 1865 and 2117
29 30 31
SE1865Apr25T
Apr 25, 1865
SE1883May06T
May 6, 1883
SE1901May18T
May 18, 1901
32 33 34
SE1919May29T
May 29, 1919
SE1937Jun08T
Jun 8, 1937
SE1955Jun20T
Jun 20, 1955
35 36 37
SE1973Jun30T
Jun 30, 1973
SE1991Jul11T
Jul 11, 1991
SE2009Jul22T
Jul 22, 2009
38 39 40
SE2027Aug02T
Aug 2, 2027
SE2045Aug12T
Aug 12, 2045
SE2063Aug24T
Aug 24, 2063
41 42 43
SE2081Sep03T
Sep 3, 2081
SE2099Sep14T
Sep 14, 2099
SE2117Sep26T
Sep 26, 2117

Inex series

This eclipse is a part of the long period inex cycle, repeating at alternating nodes, every 358 synodic months (≈ 10,571.95 days, or 29 years minus 20 days). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee). However, groupings of 3 inex cycles (≈ 87 years minus 2 months) comes close (≈ 1,151.02 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings.

Inex series members between 1901 and 2100:
SE1904Sep09T
September 9, 1904
(Saros 133)
SE1933Aug21A
August 21, 1933
(Saros 134)
SE1962Jul31A
July 31, 1962
(Saros 135)
SE1991Jul11T
July 11, 1991
(Saros 136)
SE2020Jun21A
June 21, 2020
(Saros 137)
SE2049May31A
May 31, 2049
(Saros 138)
SE2078May11T
May 11, 2078
(Saros 139)

Tritos series

This eclipse is a part of a tritos cycle, repeating at alternating nodes every 135 synodic months (≈ 3986.63 days, or 11 years minus 1 month). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee), but groupings of 3 tritos cycles (≈ 33 years minus 3 months) come close (≈ 434.044 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings.

Series members between 1901 and 2100
SE1904Mar17A
March 17, 1904
(Saros 128)
SE1915Feb14A
February 14, 1915
(Saros 129)
SE1926Jan14T
January 14, 1926
(Saros 130)
SE1936Dec13A
December 13, 1936
(Saros 131)
SE1947Nov12A
November 12, 1947
(Saros 132)
SE1958Oct12T
October 12, 1958
(Saros 133)
SE1969Sep11A
September 11, 1969
(Saros 134)
SE1980Aug10A
August 10, 1980
(Saros 135)
SE1991Jul11T
July 11, 1991
(Saros 136)
SE2002Jun10A
June 10, 2002
(Saros 137)
SE2013May10A
May 10, 2013
(Saros 138)
SE2024Apr08T
April 8, 2024
(Saros 139)
SE2035Mar09A
March 9, 2035
(Saros 140)
SE2046Feb05A
February 5, 2046
(Saros 141)
SE2057Jan05T
January 5, 2057
(Saros 142)
SE2067Dec06H
December 6, 2067
(Saros 143)
SE2078Nov04A
November 4, 2078
(Saros 144)
SE2089Oct04T
October 4, 2089
(Saros 145)
SE2100Sep04T
September 4, 2100
(Saros 146)

Metonic series

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days).

21 eclipse events, progressing from north to south between July 11, 1953 and July 11, 2029
July 10-11 April 29-30 February 15-16 December 4 September 21-23
116 118 120 122 124
SE1953Jul11P
July 11, 1953
SE1957Apr30A
April 30, 1957
SE1961Feb15T
February 15, 1961
SE1964Dec04P
December 4, 1964
SE1968Sep22T
September 22, 1968
126 128 130 132 134
SE1972Jul10T
July 10, 1972
SE1976Apr29A
April 29, 1976
SE1980Feb16T
February 16, 1980
SE1983Dec04A
December 4, 1983
SE1987Sep23A
September 23, 1987
136 138 140 142 144
SE1991Jul11T
July 11, 1991
SE1995Apr29A
April 29, 1995
SE1999Feb16A
February 16, 1999
SE2002Dec04T
December 4, 2002
SE2006Sep22A
September 22, 2006
146 148 150 152 154
SE2010Jul11T
July 11, 2010
SE2014Apr29A
April 29, 2014
SE2018Feb15P
February 15, 2018
SE2021Dec04T
December 4, 2021
SE2025Sep21P
September 21, 2025
156
SE2029Jul11P

July 11, 2029

Notes

  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  2. ^ SEsaros136 at NASA.gov

References

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