Software configuration management

In software engineering, software configuration management (SCM or S/W CM)[1] is the task of tracking and controlling changes in the software, part of the larger cross-disciplinary field of configuration management.[2] SCM practices include revision control and the establishment of baselines. If something goes wrong, SCM can determine what was changed and who changed it. If a configuration is working well, SCM can determine how to replicate it across many hosts.

The acronym "SCM" is also expanded as source configuration management process and software change and configuration management.[3] However, "configuration" is generally understood to cover changes typically made by a system administrator.

Purposes

The goals of SCM are generally:

  • Configuration identification - Identifying configurations, configuration items and baselines.
  • Configuration control - Implementing a controlled change process. This is usually achieved by setting up a change control board whose primary function is to approve or reject all change requests that are sent against any baseline.
  • Configuration status accounting - Recording and reporting all the necessary information on the status of the development process.
  • Configuration auditing - Ensuring that configurations contain all their intended parts and are sound with respect to their specifying documents, including requirements, architectural specifications and user manuals.
  • Build management - Managing the process and tools used for builds.
  • Process management - Ensuring adherence to the organization's development process.
  • Environment management - Managing the software and hardware that host the system.
  • Teamwork - Facilitate team interactions related to the process.
  • Defect tracking - Making sure every defect has traceability back to the source.

With the introduction of cloud computing the purposes of SCM tools have become merged in some cases. The SCM tools themselves have become virtual appliances that can be instantiated as virtual machines and saved with state and version. The tools can model and manage cloud-based virtual resources, including virtual appliances, storage units, and software bundles. The roles and responsibilities of the actors have become merged as well with developers now being able to dynamically instantiate virtual servers and related resources.[4]

History

The history of software configuration management (SCM) in computing can be traced back as early as the 1950s, when CM (for Configuration Management), originally for hardware development and production control, was being applied to software development. Early software had a physical footprint, such as cards, tapes, and other media. The first software configuration management was a manual operation. With the advances in language and complexity, software engineering, involving configuration management and other methods, became a major concern due to issues like schedule, budget, and quality. Practical lessons, over the years, had led to the definition, and establishment, of procedures and tools. Eventually, the tools became systems to manage software changes.[5] Industry-wide practices were offered as solutions, either in an open or proprietary manner (such as Revision Control System). With the growing use of computers, systems emerged that handled a broader scope, including requirements management, design alternatives, quality control, and more; later tools followed the guidelines of organizations, such as the Capability Maturity Model of the Software Engineering Institute.

See also

References

  1. ^ Atria (later Rational Software, now a part of IBM)
  2. ^ Roger S. Pressman (2009). Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach (7th International ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  3. ^ Gartner and Forrester Research
  4. ^ Amies, A; Peddle S; Pan T M; Zou P X (June 5, 2012). "Develop cloud applications with Rational tools". IBM developerWorks. IBM.
  5. ^ "1988 "A Guide to Understanding Configuration Management in Trusted Systems" National Computer Security System (via Google)

Further reading

  • 828-2012 IEEE Standard for Configuration Management in Systems and Software Engineering. 2012. doi:10.1109/IEEESTD.2012.6170935. ISBN 978-0-7381-7232-3.
  • Aiello, R. (2010). Configuration Management Best Practices: Practical Methods that Work in the Real World (1st ed.). Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0-321-68586-5.
  • Babich, W.A. (1986). Software Configuration Management, Coordination for Team Productivity. 1st edition. Boston: Addison-Wesley
  • Berczuk, Appleton; (2003). Software Configuration Management Patterns: Effective TeamWork, Practical Integration (1st ed.). Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0-201-74117-2.
  • Bersoff, E.H. (1997). Elements of Software Configuration Management. IEEE Computer Society Press, Los Alamitos, CA, 1-32
  • Dennis, A., Wixom, B.H. & Tegarden, D. (2002). System Analysis & Design: An Object-Oriented Approach with UML. Hoboken, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  • Department of Defense, USA (2001). Military Handbook: Configuration management guidance (rev. A) (MIL-HDBK-61A). Retrieved January 5, 2010, from http://www.everyspec.com/MIL-HDBK/MIL-HDBK-0001-0099/MIL-HDBK-61_11531/
  • Futrell, R.T. et al. (2002). Quality Software Project Management. 1st edition. Prentice-Hall.
  • International Organization for Standardization (2003). ISO 10007: Quality management systems – Guidelines for configuration management.
  • Saeki M. (2003). Embedding Metrics into Information Systems Development Methods: An Application of Method Engineering Technique. CAiSE 2003, 374-389.
  • Scott, J.A. & Nisse, D. (2001). Software configuration management. In: Guide to Software Engineering Body of Knowledge. Retrieved January 5, 2010, from http://www.computer.org/portal/web/swebok/htmlformat
  • Paul M. Duvall, Steve Matyas, and Andrew Glover (2007). Continuous Integration: Improving Software Quality and Reducing Risk. (1st ed.). Addison-Wesley Professional. ISBN 0-321-33638-0.

External links

AccuRev SCM

AccuRev is a software configuration management application developed by AccuRev, Inc. and was first released in 2002. In December 2013 AccuRev was acquired by Micro Focus.

Augeas (software)

Augeas is a free software configuration-management library, written in the C programming language. It is licensed under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License.

Augeas uses programs called lenses (in reference to the Harmony Project) to map a filesystem to an XML tree which can then be parsed using an XPath syntax, using a bidirectional transformation. Writing such lenses extends the amount of files Augeas can parse.

Branching (version control)

Branching, in revision control and software configuration management, is the duplication of an object under revision control (such as a source code file or a directory tree) so that modifications can happen in parallel along both branches.

Branches are also known as trees, streams or codelines. The originating branch is sometimes called the parent branch, the upstream branch (or simply upstream, especially if the branches are maintained by different organizations or individuals), or the backing stream. Child branches are branches that have a parent; a branch without a parent is referred to as the trunk or the mainline.In some distributed revision control systems, such as Darcs, there is no distinction made between repositories and branches; in these systems, fetching a copy of a repository is equivalent to branching.

Branching also generally implies the ability to later merge or integrate changes back onto the parent branch. Often the changes are merged back to the trunk, even if this is not the parent branch. A branch not intended to be merged (e.g. because it has been relicensed under an incompatible license by a third party, or it attempts to serve a different purpose) is usually called a fork.

Dimensions CM

Dimensions CM is a software change and configuration management product developed by Micro Focus. It includes revision control, change, build and release management capabilities.

History of software configuration management

The history of software configuration management (SCM) in computing can be traced back as early as the 1950s, when CM (for Configuration Management), originally for hardware development and production control, was being applied to software development. The first software configuration management was most likely done manually. Eventually, software tools were written to manage software changes. History records tend to be based on tools and companies, and lend concepts to a secondary plane.

IEC 62304

The international standard IEC 62304 – medical device software – software life cycle processes is a standard which specifies life cycle requirements for the development of medical software and software within medical devices. It is harmonized by the European Union (EU) and the United States (US), and therefore can be used as a benchmark to comply with regulatory requirements from both these markets.

Microsoft Visual SourceSafe

Microsoft Visual SourceSafe (VSS) is a discontinued source control program, oriented towards small software development projects. Like most source control systems, SourceSafe creates a virtual library of computer files. While most commonly used for source code, SourceSafe can handle any type of file in its database, but older versions were shown to be unstable when used to store large amounts of non-textual data such as images, and compiled executables.

Puppet (software)

In computing, Puppet is an open-core software configuration management tool. It runs on many Unix-like systems as well as on Microsoft Windows, and includes its own declarative language to describe system configuration.

Puppet is produced by Puppet, founded by Luke Kanies in 2005. It is written in C++, Clojure and Ruby, with its free-software version released under the Apache License 2.0 (the GNU General Public License (GPL) until version 2.7.0).

Rational ClearCase

Rational ClearCase is a family of computer software tools that supports software configuration management (SCM) of source code and other software development assets. It also supports design-data management of electronic design artifacts, thus enabling hardware and software co-development. ClearCase includes revision control and forms the basis for configuration management at large and medium-sized businesses, accommodating projects with hundreds or thousands of developers. It is developed by IBM.

ClearCase supports two configuration management models: UCM (Unified Change Management) and base ClearCase. UCM provides an out-of-the-box model while base ClearCase provides a basic infrastructure (UCM is built on base ClearCase). Both can be configured to support a wide variety of needs.

ClearCase can accommodate large binary files, large numbers of files, and large repository sizes. It supports branching, labeling, and versioning of directories.

Rational Synergy

Rational Synergy is a software tool that provides software configuration management (SCM) capabilities for all artifacts related to software development including source code, documents and images as well as the final built software executable and libraries. Rational Synergy also provides the repository for the change management tool known as Rational Change. Together these two tools form an integrated configuration management and change management environment that is used in software development organizations that need controlled SCM processes and an understanding of what is in a build of their software.

The name Synergy refers to its database level integration with Change Management that provides views into what is in a build in terms of defects.

SCMP (disambiguation)

SCMP may stand for:

South China Morning Post, Hong Kong newspaper

SCMP Group, former publisher of the South China Morning Post, now known as Great Wall Pan Asia Holdings

Simple Commerce Messaging Protocol

Software Configuration Management Plan

Stateless Certified Mail Protocol

SCM Anywhere

SCM Anywhere is SQL Server-based software configuration management tool with integrated revision control, bug tracking and build automation. It supports integration with CruiseControl.NET and ANT. Developed by Dynamsoft.SCM Anywhere is a client/server system. The server manages a central database and a master repository of file versions. Users work on files in local client working folder, and submit changed files together in changesets. On-premises software and Software as a service editions available.

Integration with Visual SourceSafe compatible IDEs is supported as well as Cross-platform.

Software Engineering Body of Knowledge

The Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK) is an international standard ISO/IEC TR 19759:2005 specifying a guide to the generally accepted Software Engineering Body of Knowledge.

The Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK Guide) has been created through cooperation among several professional bodies and members of industry and is published by the IEEE Computer Society (IEEE). The standard can be accessed freely from the IEEE Computer Society. In late 2013, SWEBOK V3 was approved for publication and released. In 2016, the IEEE Computer Society kicked off the SWEBoK Evolution effort to develop future iterations of the body of knowledge.

Software quality assurance

Software quality assurance (SQA) consists of a means of monitoring the software engineering processes and methods used to ensure quality. The methods by which this is accomplished are many and varied, and may include ensuring conformance to one or more standards, such as ISO 9000 or a model such as CMMI. It is a set of methods that try to ensure the quality of all projects in the software process. This includes standards and procedures that administrators may use to review and audit software products and activities to verify that the software meets standards. According to ISO/IEC 15504 v.2.5 (SPICE), it is a supporting process that has to provide the independent assurance in which all the work products, activities and processes comply with the predefined plans and ISO 15504.SQA encompasses the entire software development process including processes such as requirements definition, software design, coding, source code control, code reviews, software configuration management, testing, release management, and product integration. It is organized into: goals, commitments, abilities, activities, measurements, and verification.

Surround SCM

Surround SCM is a software configuration management application developed by Seapine Software, now owned by Perforce since 2017. Perforce integrated the software with its Helix ALM product.

Vagrant (software)

Vagrant is an open-source software product for building and maintaining portable virtual software development environments, e.g. for VirtualBox, KVM, Hyper-V, Docker containers, VMware, and AWS. It tries to simplify software configuration management of virtualizations in order to increase development productivity. Vagrant is written in the Ruby language, but its ecosystem supports development in a few languages.

Version control

A component of software configuration management, version control, also known as revision control or source control, is the management of changes to documents, computer programs, large web sites, and other collections of information. Changes are usually identified by a number or letter code, termed the "revision number", "revision level", or simply "revision". For example, an initial set of files is "revision 1". When the first change is made, the resulting set is "revision 2", and so on. Each revision is associated with a timestamp and the person making the change. Revisions can be compared, restored, and with some types of files, merged.

The need for a logical way to organize and control revisions has existed for almost as long as writing has existed, but revision control became much more important, and complicated when the era of computing began. The numbering of book editions and of specification revisions are examples that date back to the print-only era. Today, the most capable (as well as complex) revision control systems are those used in software development, where a team of people may concurrently make changes to the same files.

Version control systems (VCS) most commonly run as stand-alone applications, but revision control is also embedded in various types of software such as word processors and spreadsheets, collaborative web docs and in various content management systems, e.g., Wikipedia's page history. Revision control allows for the ability to revert a document to a previous revision, which is critical for allowing editors to track each other's edits, correct mistakes, and defend against vandalism and spamming in wikis.

Vesta (Software configuration management)

Vesta is a software configuration management system developed in the 1990s.

Walter F. Tichy

Walter F. Tichy (born April 22, 1952 in Bad Reichenhall) is a German computer scientist. He is professor of computer science at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany where he teaches classes in software engineering.

To the larger software development community he is best known as the initial developer of the RCS revision control system. However, he has also written highly cited works on experimental software engineering, the string-to-string correction problem, software configuration management, and extreme programming.

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