Slidecasting

A slidecast is a type of podcast that combines audio with a slideshow or diaporama presentation. It is similar to a video podcast in that it combines dynamically-generated imagery with audio synchronization, but it is different in that it uses presentation software, such as PowerPoint, to create the imagery and the sequence of display separately from the time of the audio podcast's original recording.

Slidecasting may be useful for the display of relevant photographs or text, and are an alternative to camera video recordings.

An alternative definition of the slidecast is the online distribution and syndication of video recordings of live slideshow presentations and accompanying narrations.

Distribution

Like other podcast derivatives, slidecasts are syndicated through RSS. Because of the visual dependency, slidecasts are usually distributed in video formats, such as .flv or .mov, similarly to video podcasts, but HTML5 now makes it possible for slidecasts to be distributed in straight HTML,[1][2] making them compatible with iPhone and iPad devices. Slidecasts may also be embedded into webpages and textual blog articles in a similar fashion to web-based videos[3][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Demo of HTML 5 based Eduvid Audio Slidecasting
  2. ^ Demo of HTML 5 based Eduvid Video Slidecasting
  3. ^ Now you can sync narration with your slides on Slideshare
  4. ^ SlideCasting: The SlideCast
Broadcatching

Broadcatching is the downloading of digital content that has been made available over the Internet using RSS.

The general idea is to use an automated mechanism to aggregate various web feeds and download content for viewing or presentation purposes.

Data feed

Data feed is a mechanism for users to receive updated data from data sources. It is commonly used by real-time applications in point-to-point settings as well as on the World Wide Web. The latter is also called web feed. News feed is a popular form of web feed. RSS feed makes dissemination of blogs easy. Product feeds play increasingly important role in e-commerce and internet marketing, as well as news distribution, financial markets, and cybersecurity. Data feeds usually require structured data that include different labelled fields, such as "title" or "product".

Electronic journal

Electronic journals, also known as ejournals, e-journals, and electronic serials, are scholarly journals or intellectual magazines that can be accessed via electronic transmission.

Escribitionist

An escribitionist is a person who keeps a diary or journal via electronic means, and in particular, publishes their entries on the world wide web. The word was coined in June 1999 by Erin Venema, an online diarist, in the course of a discussion on a mailing list for web journalers. At issue was how to distinguish web journal authors from keepers of traditional paper-and-ink diaries.

The word comes from a combination of the English word "exhibitionist" and the Spanish word "escribir", meaning "to write". (The latter is cognate to the English "scribe"; both come from the Latin scribere.) It also evokes the marketing gimmick of using the letter "e" as a prefix to imply a link to technology and electronics, although that was not intended.

Coined before the widespread use of weblogs, the word escribitionist is often used to distinguish diary keepers on the web from weblog authors, whose writing often involve far more diverse styles, perspectives and subjects than those used in personal journals. While a weblog author may engage in journaling, or reporting, or political commentary, an escribitionist is focused on personal experiences and reflection.

Feed URI scheme

The feed URI scheme was a suggested uniform resource identifier (URI) scheme designed to facilitate subscription to web feeds; specifically, it was intended that a news aggregator be launched whenever a hyperlink to a feed URI was clicked in a web browser.

The scheme was intended to flag a document in a syndication format such as Atom or RSS. The document would be typically served over HTTP.by open wave and sms http based html Uri as feed.

Media RSS

Media RSS (MRSS) is an RSS extension that adds several enhancements to RSS enclosures, and is used for syndicating multimedia files (audio, video, image) in RSS feeds. It was originally designed by Yahoo! and the Media RSS community in 2004, but in 2009 its development has been moved to the RSS Advisory Board. One example of enhancements is specification of thumbnails for each media enclosure, and the possibility to enclose multiple versions of the same content (e.g. different file formats).

The format can be used for podcasting, which uses the RSS format as a means of delivering content to media-playing devices, as well as Smart TVs. Media RSS allows for a much more detailed description of the content to be delivered to the subscriber than the RSS standard. The standard is also used by content publishers to feed media files into Yahoo! Video Search, which is a feature of Yahoo! Search that allows users to search for video files.

Photoblog

A photoblog (or photolog) is a form of photo sharing and publishing in the format of a blog. It differs from a blog through the predominant use of and focus on photographs rather than text. Photoblogging (the action of posting photos to a photoblog) gained momentum in the early 2000s with the advent of the moblog and cameraphones.

Photofeed

A photofeed is a web feed that features image enclosures. They provide an easy, standard way to reference a list of images with title, date and description.

Photofeeds are RSS enclosures of image file formats, similar to podcasts (enclosures of audio file formats).

Police blog

Police blogs are a means for police officers from around the world to tell others about their work and way of life.

The authors often retain anonymity to avoid affecting their ongoing cases. Most police services also have rules on blogging activities that might bring the organisation into disrepute.

It is usual for police bloggers to adopt a pseudonym, such as PC David Copperfield. He is believed to have created the first UK blog of its type, extracts from which were published in the book Wasting Police Time. Subsequently, a further book, Diary of An On Call Girl has been published, based on the blog of PC Ellie Bloggs, and the book Perverting the Course of Justice based on the blog of Inspector Gadget.Emergency Shorts complements its selection of other Emergency service blogs by collecting feeds from popular police blogs, including Crime and Justice which is a news-based police blog publishing press releases from all UK Police forces.

Product feed

A product feed or product data feed is a file made up of a list of products and attributes of those products organized so that each product can be displayed, advertised or compared in a unique way. A product feed typically contains a product image, title, product identifier, marketing copy, and product attributes.Product feeds supply the content that is presented on many kinds of e-commerce websites such as search engines, price comparison websites, affiliate networks, and other similar aggregators of e-commerce information. Product data feeds are generated by manufacturers, online retailers and, in some cases, product information is extracted using web scraping or harvested web harvesting from the online shops website.

Project diary

A project diary, history, journal or log is a record of a project which is compiled while it is being done.

RSS editor

An RSS editor is a software application for writing and editing RSS feeds offline (i.e. on the local computer). These applications are also often called desktop RSS editors. Usually RSS feeds are automatically generated out of databases from Content Management Systems (CMS). Some other typical sources for RSS feeds are blogs and websites like Digg. However, there are also several, manually edited RSS feeds (mostly with editorial content), which are maintained offline. After the development and creation of such feeds in an RSS editor application, the feed file is usually transmitted via FTP to the web server. Most RSS editors offer a corresponding, integrated functionality for that.

RSS tracking

RSS tracking is a methodology for tracking RSS feeds.

Reverse blog

A reverse blog is a type of blog that is characterized by the lack of a single, specific blogger. In a traditional blog a blogger will write his or her comments about a given topic and other users may view and sometimes comment on the bloggers work. A reverse blog is written entirely by the users, who are given a topic. The blog posts are usually screened and chosen for publication by a core group or the publisher of the blog.

Rollback (data management)

In database technologies, a rollback is an operation which returns the database to some previous state. Rollbacks are important for database integrity, because they mean that the database can be restored to a clean copy even after erroneous operations are performed. They are crucial for recovering from database server crashes; by rolling back any transaction which was active at the time of the crash, the database is restored to a consistent state.

The rollback feature is usually implemented with a transaction log, but can also be implemented via multiversion concurrency control.

SlideShare

LinkedIn SlideShare is a hosting service for professional content including presentations, infographics, documents, and videos. Users can upload files privately or publicly in PowerPoint, Word, PDF, or OpenDocument format. Content can then be viewed on the site itself, on hand held devices or embedded on other sites. Launched on October 4, 2006, the website is considered to be similar to YouTube, but for slideshows. It was acquired by LinkedIn in 2012. The website was originally meant to be used for businesses to share slides among employees more easily, but it also has expanded to become a host of a large number of slides that are uploaded merely to entertain. Although the website is primarily a slide hosting service, it also supports documents, PDFs, videos and webinars. SlideShare also provides users the ability to rate, comment on, and share the uploaded content.

The website gets an estimated 80 million unique visitors a month, and has about 38 million registered users. SlideShare's biggest competitors include Zoho.com, Scribd.com, Issuu and edocr. Some of the notable users of SlideShare include The White House, NASA, World Economic Forum, State of Utah, O'Reilly Media, Hewlett Packard and IBM.

Video aggregator

A video aggregator is a website that collects and organizes online videos from other sources. Video aggregation is done for different purposes, and websites take different approaches to achieve their purpose.

Some sites try to collect videos of high quality or interest for visitors to view. The collection may be made by editors or may be based on community votes. Another method is to base the collection on those videos most viewed, either at the aggregator site or at various popular video hosting sites.Some sites exist to allow users to collect their own sets of videos, for personal use as well as browsing and viewing by others. These sites can develop online communities around video sharing. Other sites allow users to create a personalized video playlist, for personal use as well as for browsing and viewing by others.

Web series

A web series is a ofseriies of script bed or non-scripted videos, generally in episodic form, released on the Internet and part of the web television medium, which first emerged in the late 1990s and become more prominent in the early 2000s. A single instance of a web series program can be called an episode or "webisode", however the latter term is not often used. In general, web series can be watched on a range of platforms, including desktop, laptop, tablets and smartphones. They can also be watched on television.

In 2013, streaming video website Netflix earned the first Primetime Emmy Award nominations for original online-only web television at the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards. Three of its web series, House of Cards, Arrested Development, and Hemlock Grove, earned nominations that year.As of 2016, there are a number of awards that have been established to award excellence in web series production, including the Streamys, Webbys, IAWTV, and Indie Series Awards; there are also several web series festivals, most notably in Los Angeles and Vancouver. Most major award ceremonies have also created web series and digital media award categories, including the Emmy Awards and the Canadian Screen Awards.

XBEL

The XML Bookmark Exchange Language (XBEL), is an open XML standard for sharing Internet URIs, also known as bookmarks (or favorites in Internet Explorer).

An example of XBEL use is the XBELicious application, which stores Del.icio.us bookmarks in XBEL format. The Galeon, Konqueror, Arora and Midori web browsers use XBEL as the format for storing user bookmarks. The SiteBar bookmark server can import and export bookmarks in XBEL format.

XBEL was created by the Python XML Special Interest Group "to create an interesting, fun project which was both useful and would demonstrate the Python XML processing software which was being developed at the time".It is also used by Nautilus and gedit of the GNOME desktop environment.

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