Skip Stahley

Jacob Neil "Skip" Stahley (September 22, 1908 – June 27, 1992)[2][3][4] was an American college football coach and athletic director. He served as the head football coach at the University of Delaware in 1934, Brown University from 1941 to 1943, George Washington University from 1946 to 1947, the University of Toledo from 1948 to 1949, and the University of Idaho from 1954 to 1961, compiling a career record of 56–85–3.[5] Stahley was the athletic director at Idaho from 1960 to 1964 and Portland State University from 1964 to 1972.

Skip Stahley
Biographical details
BornSeptember 22, 1908
Lebanon, Pennsylvania
DiedJune 27, 1992 (aged 83)
Portland, Oregon
Alma materPennsylvania State College
Columbia University[1]
Playing career
1928–1930Penn State
Position(s)Back[1]
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1931–1933Western Maryland (assistant)
1934Delaware
1935–1940Harvard (backfield)
1941–1943Brown
1946–1947George Washington
1948–1949Toledo
1950–1952Washington (backfield)
1953Chicago Cardinals (backfield)
1954–1961Idaho
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1960–1964Idaho
1964–1972Portland State
Head coaching record
Overall56–85–3
Bowls1–1
Skip Stahley
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Navy
Years of service1944–1946
UnitTraining
Battles/warsWorld War II

Early years

Born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania,[6] Stahley was an outstanding athlete at Lebanon High School and graduated in 1926.[7] He attended Penn State in State College, where he majored in English and played football, earning honorable mention All-American honors. A three-sport letterman, Stahley also captained the basketball and lacrosse teams for the Nittany Lions. He graduated in 1931 and later earned a master's degree from Columbia University.[1][7]

Early coaching career

Stahley began his coaching career in 1931 as an assistant at Western Maryland College in Westminster under head coach Dick Harlow. In 1934, he became the head coach at the University of Delaware, and compiled a 4–3–1 record in Newark, then moved north to the Boston area and was an assistant coach at Harvard University, also under Harlow. From 1941 to 1943, Stahley was the head coach at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island,[8] with a 14–11 (.560) record.[5]

Stahley served in the U.S. Navy in San Diego during World War II, and then coached in Washington, D.C. at George Washington University, with a 5–10–1 record in 1946 and 1947. He briefly returned to the West Coast in March 1948 as the backfield coach at the University of Washington in Seattle under new head coach Howie Odell. After two months, Stahley left for the Midwest to become the head coach at Toledo,[9][10] and compiled an 11–10 record in two seasons.

Stahley returned to Seattle in 1950 as backfield coach at Washington for three seasons under Odell, where he mentored notable Huskies Hugh McElhenny[11] and Don Heinrich.[12] Odell was pressured to resign by the athletic director after a 7–3 season in 1952 and was replaced by John Cherberg, the coach of the freshman team.

NFL

Stahley left the Huskies to coach in the National Football League (NFL) as the backfield coach with the Chicago Cardinals under head coach Joe Stydahar. The Cardinals ended 1953 with a win in the final game to finish at 1–10–1 (.125), the worst record in the twelve-team league.[13]

Idaho

Stahley quickly returned to college football in February 1954 as the head coach at Idaho[1][12][14] at an annual salary of $9,000.[15] The Vandals had finished the 1953 season at 1–8 under third-year head coach Babe Curfman.[16][17][18][19]

Stahley compiled a 22–51–1 (.304) record in eight seasons in Moscow.[5] While on the Palouse, he coached future NFL notables Jerry Kramer, Wayne Walker,[11] Jim Prestel, and AFL all-star Jim Norton.[3] The Vandals were members of the Pacific Coast Conference for Stahley's first five seasons, then played as an independent when the conference disbanded. Idaho's only conference victory under Stahley came in his first season: the winless Vandals (0–5) surprised and shut out neighbor Washington State 10–0 in Pullman in the Battle of the Palouse in 1954.[20] It was Idaho's first victory in football over the Cougars in 29 years,[21] and the subsequent eight-mile (13 km) march by WSC students from Pullman to Moscow was featured in Life magazine:[22] The win started a four-game winning streak, Idaho's longest in 31 years, to finish at 4–5 for the 1954 season.[23][24] That win at Rogers Field in his first attempt turned out to be Stahley's only triumph over the Cougars; the Vandals waited a full decade before the next.[25]

When Idaho athletic director Bob Gibb left in 1960, Stahley took over those duties in July for four years.[26] He handled both jobs for a year and a half, then stepped down under pressure as football coach in January 1962.[27][28] The following month, he hired Dee Andros, an assistant coach at Illinois and a former guard under Bud Wilkinson at Oklahoma.[29][30][31] As AD, Stahley was a driving force in the creation of the Big Sky Conference, which was formed in February 1963.[32][33]

After a decade in Moscow, Stahley resigned as Idaho's athletic director in 1964 to become the first full-time director of athletics at Portland State College (now PSU),[34][35] where he served until late 1971.[3][36] Following the 1964 football season, Andros left after three years for Oregon State in Corvallis to succeed Tommy Prothro, who left the Rose Bowl team for UCLA.

Stahley's eight consecutive seasons as head coach of Idaho football remains the most in the university's history; as a result, he also continues to lead the Vandals in losses, with 51.

U.S. patent

Prior to his last season as head coach, Stahley was granted a US patent 2967709 for an early defensive reaction machine,[7] issued on January 10, 1961.[4] The "Athletic Training Apparatus" was conceived to improve the reactions of defensive linemen at the line of scrimmage.

Halls of fame

Stahley is a member of the Idaho Sports Hall of Fame, the Western Pennsylvania Hall of Fame, and the National Association of Collegiate athletic directors Hall of Fame.[2]

Personal

Stahley married Mrs. Shirley Sherman Kime (c.1910–1993) in Toledo on July 1, 1950. They had two daughters, and she had two sons from a previous marriage.[2][37] Following retirement from PSU in 1972, Stahley and his wife continued to reside in Portland for the next two decades; he died in 1992 at the age of 83,[3][6] and she died the following year.[38][39]

Crime fighter

While an assistant coach in 1938, The Harvard Crimson newspaper reported that Stahley knocked out a suspected burglar with a single punch.[40] In the early hours of a winter morning in Somerville, Massachusetts, the perpetrator was halfway through a second floor apartment window when he was discovered by its female occupant, and she let out an audible warning. Stahley also lived in the building, and he and a couple of companions were outside at the base of the fire escape to encounter him.[40]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens (Independent) (1934)
1934 Delaware 4–3–1
Delaware: 4–3–1
Brown Bears (Independent) (1941–1943)
1941 Brown 5–4
1942 Brown 4–4
1943 Brown 5–3
Brown: 14–11
George Washington Colonials (Southern Conference) (1946–1947)
1946 George Washington 4–3 1–1 9th
1947 George Washington 1–7–1 0–4 16th
George Washington: 5–10–1 1–5
Toledo Rockets (Independent) (1948–1949)
1948 Toledo 5–6 W Glass
1949 Toledo 6–4 L Glass
Toledo: 11–10
Idaho Vandals (Pacific Coast Conference) (1954–1958)
1954 Idaho 4–5 1–2 7th
1955 Idaho 2–7 0–4 9th
1956 Idaho 4–5 0–4 9th
1957 Idaho 4–4–1 0–3 9th
1958 Idaho 4–5 0–3 9th
Idaho Vandals (NCAA University Division independent) (1959–1961)
1959 Idaho 1–9
1960 Idaho 1–9
1961 Idaho 2–7
Idaho: 22–51–1 1–16
Total: 56–85–3

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Stahley chosen Idaho grid pilot". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). February 2, 1954. p. 10.
  2. ^ a b c The University of Idaho Magazine, Oct 1992, Vol.10, No.4, p.20.
  3. ^ a b c d "Former Idaho coach dies". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. (Idaho-Washington). July 2, 1992. p. 1C.
  4. ^ a b Stahley, Jacob N. (January 10, 1961). "Athletic Training Apparatus #2,967,709". United States Patent and Trademark Office. (filed: November 12, 1959). Retrieved November 21, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c CFB Data Warehouse - Skip Stahley - accessed 2009-10-03
  6. ^ a b "J. Neil (Skip) Stahley, 83, UI athletic director". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Retrieved September 7, 2015.
  7. ^ a b c Worden, Al (December 21, 1962). "J. Neil (Skip) Slahley has fine career in college sports events". Ogden Standard-Examiner. (Utah). p. 16.
  8. ^ "Skip Stahley named head coach at Brown; was at Harvard". Lewiston Daily Sun. (Maine). Associated Press. February 13, 1941. p. 9.
  9. ^ "Stahley to coach at Toledo". Meriden Record. (Connecticut). Associated Press. May 5, 1948. p. 12.
  10. ^ Rothman, Seymour (August 5, 1948). "TU's new kicking device". Toledo Blade. (Ohio). p. 31.
  11. ^ a b Missildine, Harry (May 24, 1964). "Stahley's departure conjures memories". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. 1-sports.
  12. ^ a b "Skip Stahley named Idaho grid mentor". Ellensburg Daily Record. (Washington). Associated Press. February 12, 1954. p. 6.
  13. ^ "1953 Chicago Cardinals". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved April 25, 2012.
  14. ^ "Stahley seeking three assistants; new Idaho coach to get free hand". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). February 12, 1954. p. 10.
  15. ^ "O.K. Stahley's $9,000 salary". Ellensburg Daily Record. (Washington). Associated Press. February 23, 1954. p. 8.
  16. ^ "Idaho regents meet in January; Babe Curfman position unsettled". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). November 23, 1953. p. 15.
  17. ^ "Curfman and three aides resign posts at Idaho". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). December 21, 1953. p. 21.
  18. ^ "'Circumstances' force Curfman's resignation". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). December 22, 1953. p. 12.
  19. ^ "Idaho plans thorough search for coach; Curfman out". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). December 22, 1953. p. 12.
  20. ^ Boni, Bill (October 24, 1954). "Idaho thumps WSC, 10-0". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. 1-sports.
  21. ^ ""Win made us ballclub," says Skip Stahley". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). October 25, 1954. p. 17.
  22. ^ "The March on Moscow". Life. November 15, 1954. p. 63.
  23. ^ "Vandals win fourth in a row". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. November 21, 1954. p. 1-sports.
  24. ^ "Stahley is satisfied with Vandals' season". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). November 22, 1954. p. 17.
  25. ^ Missildine, Harry (October 25, 1964). "Thunder Ray leads Idaho's charge". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. 1-sports.
  26. ^ "Stahley new Idaho "A.D." in addition to grid post". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). March 22, 1960. p. 13.
  27. ^ "Idaho regents drop Stahley from grid post". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). January 15, 1962. p. 10.
  28. ^ "Idaho fires grid coach Skip Stahley". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. UPI. January 15, 1962. p. 2B.
  29. ^ Carter, Jack (February 18, 1962). "Illinois aide Dee Andros named Idaho football coach". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). p. 8.
  30. ^ Missildine, Harry (February 18, 1962). "Former Sooner guard new Idaho coach". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. 1-sports.
  31. ^ "New Vandal coach". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). (photo). February 19, 1962. p. 11.
  32. ^ Missildine, Harry (February 26, 1963). "Six western schools create Big Sky athletic conference". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. 12.
  33. ^ "Big Sky is ready for league action". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). February 26, 1963. p. 13.
  34. ^ "Portland State names Stahley athletic director". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). UPI. May 20, 1964. p. 1D.
  35. ^ "Stahley quits Idaho post for job at Portland State". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). May 21, 1964. p. 10.
  36. ^ "Skip Stahley steps down as Vik AD". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). UPI. November 18, 1971. p. 3D.
  37. ^ "Stahley weds". Toledo Blade. (Ohio). July 4, 1950. p. 35.
  38. ^ "Shirley Stahley". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. Idaho-Washington. (obituary). September 21, 1993. p. 3A.
  39. ^ "Shirley Sherman Stahley". Toledo Blade. Ohio. (obituary). September 15, 1993. p. 14.
  40. ^ a b "Skip Stahley fells burglar with his powerhouse punch". Harvard Crimson. (Cambridge, Massachusetts). February 2, 1938. Retrieved November 21, 2016.

External links

1941 Brown Bears football team

The 1941 Brown Bears football team represented Brown University during the 1941 college football season.

1942 Brown Bears football team

The 1942 Brown Bears football team represented Brown University during the 1942 college football season.

1943 Brown Bears football team

The 1943 Brown Bears football team represented Brown University during the 1943 college football season.

1947 George Washington Colonials football team

The 1947 George Washington Colonials football team was an American football team that represented George Washington University as an independent during the 1936 college football season. In its second and final season under head coach Skip Stahley, the team compiled a 1–7–1 record (0–4 against conference records), finished 16th in the Southern Conference, and was outscored by a total of 177 to 92.

1948 Toledo Rockets football team

The 1948 Toledo Rockets football team was an American football team that represented the University of Toledo during the 1948 college football season. In their first season under head coach Skip Stahley, the Rockets compiled a 5–6 record, were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 225 to 206, and defeated Oklahoma City, 27–14, in the third postseason Glass Bowl game.On October 2, 1948, Chuck Hardy set a Toledo school record that still stands with a 100-yard kickoff return against John Carroll. On October 9, 1948, the Rockets renewed the Bowling Green–Toledo football rivalry after a 13-year hiatus. Toledo lost to Bowling Green, 21-6, in the 1948 game. During the 1948 season, a Toledo football game was televised for the first time on WSPD-TV13 (later WTVG). The 1948 team captains were Mardo Hamilton and Mike Carman.

1949 Toledo Rockets football team

The 1949 Toledo Rockets football team was an American football team that represented the University of Toledo during the 1949 college football season. In their second and final season under head coach Skip Stahley, the Rockets compiled a 6–4 record, outscored their opponents by a combined total of 318 to 210, and lost to Mid-American Conference champion Cincinnati, 33–13, in the fourth postseason Glass Bowl game.During the 1949 season, Toledo back Emerson Cole, who later played in the NFL, rushed 160 times for 1,172 yards, an average of 7.26 yards per carry. On November 12, 1949, Cole rushed for 230 yards against North Dakota. Cole's 1,172 rushing yards stood as a Toledo single-season record until 1984. The 1939 Toledo team averaged 253.8 rushing yards per game. Ed Burrus and George Miley were the team captains.

1953 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1953 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1953 college football season. The Vandals were led by third-year head coach Raymond "Babe" Curfman and were members of the Pacific Coast Conference. Home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with two games in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

Led on the field by quarterback George Eidam, Idaho compiled a 1–8 record and were winless in their three PCC games.

The Vandals suffered another loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, falling 13–30 at Neale Stadium on October 17. It ran the winless streak against the Cougars to 27 games, a record of 0–25–2 since taking three straight in 1923–25; the Vandals broke the streak the next year in Pullman under new head coach Skip Stahley.In the rivalry game with Montana at Missoula two weeks earlier, the Vandals ran their winning streak over the Grizzlies to three and retained the Little Brown Stein. Idaho scored twenty unanswered points to win 20–12, in their sole victory of the season.

Head coach Curfman made headlines in 1953 as his overmatched Vandals struggled in conference play in the PCC, and was under fire from alumni and boosters after a disappointing season. Following his resignation in December, he was hired as the business manager for the Spokane Indians minor league baseball team in January 1954.

1954 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1954 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1954 college football season. The Vandals were led by first-year head coach Skip Stahley and were members of the Pacific Coast Conference. Home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one home game in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

Idaho compiled a 4–5 overall record and were 1–2 in the PCC. After five losses to open, they won their last four games. Six of the nine games were shutouts, with three wins and three losses.

In the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, the 0–5 Vandals blanked the Cougars 10–0 in Pullman on October 23 for Stahley's first victory as head coach. It was Idaho's first win in the series in 29 years; the next came ten years later in 1964.The annual game with Montana was not played this year; outside of wartime years (without teams), it was the first break in the rivalry in forty years. Idaho was three games into an eight-game streak over the Grizzlies and retained the Little Brown Stein until 1960.

After the win in Pullman, Idaho defeated favored Utah in Salt Lake City, then shut out North Dakota in Moscow and BYU in Boise.

1955 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1955 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1955 college football season. The Vandals were led by second-year head coach Skip Stahley and were members of the Pacific Coast Conference. Home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one home game in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

Idaho compiled a 2–7 overall record and lost all four games in the PCC. After seven losses to open, including three straight shutouts, they won their last two games.

The Vandals lost the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, blanked 0–9 at home on October 15. Idaho won the previous year in Pullman, the first win over the Cougars since 1925; the next came in 1964. In the rivalry game with Montana, the Vandals ran their winning streak over the Grizzlies to four and retained the Little Brown Stein.

1956 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1956 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. The Vandals were led by third-year head coach Skip Stahley and were members of the Pacific Coast Conference. Home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one home game in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

Idaho compiled a 4–5 overall record but were 0–4 in the PCC. After four losses to open, the Vandals won three straight, then split the final two games.

After road losses to Washington and Oregon, the Vandals suffered a second straight loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, falling 19–33 at home on October 6. Following the game, skirmishes between student factions provoked the Moscow city police to use tear gas to control the situation. The following week, Idaho was depleted by injuries and came out on the short end of a 41-point homecoming shutout by Arizona State.The most recent winning season for Idaho football was 18 years earlier in 1938, and the Vandals were a win shy in 1956. The streak was broken seven years later in 1963.

1957 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1957 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1957 NCAA University Division football season. The Vandals were led by fourth-year head coach Skip Stahley and were members of the Pacific Coast Conference. Home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one home game in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

Led on the field by quarterbacks Howard Willis and Gary Kenworthy, Idaho compiled a 4–4–1 overall record and were 0–3 in the PCC.

The Vandals suffered a third straight loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, falling 21–13 at Rogers Field in Pullman on November 16. The loss prevented the first winning season for Idaho football since 1938. In the rivalry game with Montana, the Vandals ran their winning streak over the Grizzlies to six and retained the Little Brown Stein.

1958 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1958 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1958 NCAA University Division football season. The Vandals were led by fifth-year head coach Skip Stahley and were members of the Pacific Coast Conference, which disbanded the following spring. Home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one home game in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

The Vandals suffered a fourth straight loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, blanked 0–8 at home on October 11. In the rivalry game with Montana at Missoula, the Vandals ran their winning streak over the Grizzlies to seven and retained the Little Brown Stein.

1959 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1959 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1959 NCAA University Division football season. Led by sixth-year head coach Skip Stahley, the Vandals were an independent in the NCAA's University Division and had a 1–9 record. Two home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

The Pacific Coast Conference disbanded in the spring, and Idaho was an independent in football for the next six seasons. They played ten games for the first time; the first six were on the road, and two games were played at night (at Arizona and Pacific).

The Vandals suffered a fifth straight loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State; Idaho led at halftime, but fell 5–27 at Rogers Field in Pullman. In the rivalry game with Montana at Neale Stadium, the Vandals narrowly retained the Little Brown Stein in the finale to avoid going winless.

After this season, Stahley took on the dual role of athletic director in July 1960.

1960 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1960 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1960 NCAA University Division football season. Led by seventh-year head coach Skip Stahley, the Vandals were an independent in the NCAA's University Division and had a 1–9 record. Two home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one in Boise at Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

The Vandals suffered a sixth straight loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, falling 7–18 at Neale Stadium in mid-November. In the rivalry game with Montana in Missoula, the Vandals lost the Little Brown Stein for the first time in a decade.

Since the disbanding of the Pacific Coast Conference in the spring of 1959, Idaho had just one win per season as an independent. Stahley took on the dual role of athletic director in July.

Idaho played ten games, with five scheduled at night, and their only win came at Hawaii. The game was scheduled for Friday night, but due to travel delays, it was played on Sunday afternoon. The Vandals stayed on Oahu until Thursday, then flew to California for their next game, against Pacific in Stockton on Saturday night.

1961 Idaho Vandals football team

The 1961 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1961 NCAA University Division football season. Led by eighth-year head coach Skip Stahley, the Vandals were an independent in the NCAA's University Division and went 2–7. Two home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

The Vandals suffered a seventh straight loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, blanked 0–34 in Pullman in mid-October. In the rivalry game with Montana, the Vandals regained the Little Brown Stein with a 16–14 win in the season finale at Boise.In Idaho's seven losses, they were outscored 319 to 22, with three shutouts; the worst was a 69–0 rout by Utah State in a blizzard at Logan. Since the disbanding of the Pacific Coast Conference in the spring of 1959, Idaho's football teams had a 4–25 (.138) record in three seasons as an independent. Stahley had taken on the dual role of athletic director in July 1960; he stepped down as head football coach in January 1962, and his successor was Dee Andros, the line coach at Illinois, hired in February. Stahley continued as Idaho's AD until mid-1964, when he departed for a similar position at Portland State College.

Charles F. Erb

Charles Freeman Erb Jr. (December 8, 1902 – March 6, 1952) was an American football player and coach. He was the head coach at the University of Nevada, Reno (1924), the University of Idaho (1926–1928), and Humboldt State College (1935–1937), compiling a career college football record of 28–19–7.

Jim Goddard (basketball)

Jim Goddard (born circa 1930) is a former American college basketball coach in the western United States.

He was the head coach at Idaho for three seasons and previously at his alma mater Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon.From Salem, Oregon, Goddard had been on the basketball coaching staff at Lewis & Clark for the previous six seasons, the last four as head coach. In each of the last two years, the Pioneers won the season title in the Northwest Conference, then in NAIA; and both teams advanced to the 32-team national tournament in Kansas City, Missouri. Lewis & Clark won in the first round in 1962, and advanced to the quarterfinals in 1963; that team was inducted into the school's athletic hall of fame.

After Idaho's successful 20–6 season in 1963 with Gus Johnson at center, head coach Joe Cipriano departed for Nebraska, and athletic director Skip Stahley hired Goddard in April. He led the Vandals for the first three seasons of the six-team Big Sky Conference, then unexpectedly resigned in August 1966 for an administrative position at the Oregon department of education. Goddard was succeeded by alumnus Wayne Anderson, a longtime assistant and head baseball coach.

Milton Aronowitz

Lieutenant Milton Aronowitz was an American college football head coach who was Delaware football program's ninth head coach. He led them to a 1–2–2 overall record in 1918—his only season.

Wilfred C. Bleamaster

Wilfred Charles Bleamaster (June 8, 1881 – December 19, 1973) was an American football and basketball coach. He served as the head football coach at Carroll College—now Carroll University—in Waukesha, Wisconsin from 1909 to 1911, at Alma College from 1912 to 1915, and at the University of Idaho from 1916 to 1917, compiling a career college football record of 28–27–5. Bleamaster was also the head basketball coach at Alma from 1912 to 1916 and at Idaho for the 1918–19 season, tallying a career college basketball mark of 28–29.

Bleamaster was captain of the football team at Grinnell College in Iowa and graduated in 1908.

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