Singing quail

The singing quail (Dactylortyx thoracicus) is a species of bird in the family Odontophoridae. It is found in Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forest, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest.

Singing quail
Codorniz Silbadora, Singing Quail, Dactylortyx thoracicus (23387866083)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Odontophoridae
Genus: Dactylortyx
Ogilvie-Grant, 1893
Species:
D. thoracicus
Binomial name
Dactylortyx thoracicus
(Gambel, 1848)

References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Dactylortyx thoracicus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
List of Galliformes

The Galliformes are a clade of bird species of cosmopolitan distribution that, with the Anseriformes, belong to the branch Galloanserae. The group have more than 270 living species and includes the megapodes, chachalacas, guans, curassows, turkeys, grouse, New World quails, pheasants, partridges and guineafowl. They are, with Neoaves, the two main lineages of Neognathae. Extinct species assignment follows the Mikko's Phylogeny Archive and Paleofile.com websites.

List of Galliformes by population

This is a list of Galliformes species by global population. While numbers are estimates, they have been made by the experts in their fields. For more information on how these estimates were ascertained, see Wikipedia's articles on population biology and population ecology.

This list is not comprehensive, as not all Galliformes have had their numbers quantified.

List of bird genera

List of bird genera concerns the chordata class of aves or birds, characterised by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, and a high metabolic rate.

List of birds by common name

In this list of birds by common name, a total of 9,722 extant and recently extinct bird species are recognised, belonging to a total of 204 families.

List of birds of Belize

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Belize. Belize includes around 450 smaller cays and islands lying in the Caribbean Sea in addition to the mainland. The avifauna of Belize include a total of 603 species as of February 2018, according to Bird Checklists of the World. Of these, 77 are rare or accidental and four have been introduced. None are endemic to the country.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in Belize as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The tags and notes of population status are from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Belize

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Belize as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of El Salvador

This is a list of the bird species recorded in El Salvador. The avifauna of El Salvador included a total of 605 species as of February 2018, according to Bird Checklists of the World. One additional species has been added through eBird. Of the 606 species, 61 are rare or accidental and six have been introduced by humans.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in El Salvador as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The tags and notes of population status are from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in El Salvador

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to El Salvador as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Guatemala

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Guatemala. The avifauna of Guatemala included a total of 762 species as of August 2017, according to Bird Checklists of the World. Of them, 46 are rare or accidental and five have been introduced by humans. One species (now extinct) was endemic and two non-endemic species have been extirpated.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in Guatemala as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The tags and notes of population status are from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Guatemala

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Guatemala

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Guatemala as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Honduras

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Honduras. The avifauna of Honduras included a total of 766 species as of August 2015, according to La Asociación Hondureña de Ornitología (ASHO). Between that date and July 2018, an additional 10 species have been added through eBird.Of the 776 species listed here, one of them, the Honduran emerald, is endemic. Thirty-seven are rare or accidental and five have been introduced by humans. Five species are hypothetical (see below) and a few have insufficient information to classify. Some of the "hypothetical" species have more recent eBird records with photographs. Two species have possibly been extirpated. Eleven species are globally vulnerable or endangered.This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in Honduras as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags are used by ASHO to highlight several categories of occurrence.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Honduras

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Honduras

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Honduras as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(H) Hypothetical - a species recorded but with no tangible evidence such as a photograph, according to the ASHO

(?) Insufficient information - Appended to a tag or note because of uncertainty

List of birds of Mexico

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Mexico. The avifauna of Mexico included a total of 1118 species as of February 2018, according to Bird Checklists of the World. Of these species, 87 are rare or accidental, 10 have been introduced by humans, 108 are endemic, and five more breed only in Mexico though their non-breeding range is larger. Four species are known to be extinct, 65 are globally vulnerable or endangered, and three of the latter might also be extinct. The total figure includes a number of species which are known only from sight records; they are listed but not especially noted. An additional endemic species was named in July 2018, so it is not in the above counts.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in Mexico as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The tags and notes of population status are from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Mexico

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Mexico

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Mexico as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of North America (Galliformes)

The birds listed below all belong to the biological order Galliformes, and are native to North America.

List of endemic birds of Mexico and northern Central America

This article is one of a series providing information about endemism among birds in the world's various zoogeographic zones. For an overview of this subject see Endemism in birds.

List of least concern birds

As of May 2019, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 8405 least concern avian species. 76% of all evaluated avian species are listed as least concern.

No subpopulations of birds have been evaluated by the IUCN.

This is a complete list of least concern avian species evaluated by the IUCN. Where possible common names for taxa are given while links point to the scientific name used by the IUCN.

New World quail

The New World quails or Odontophoridae are small birds only distantly related to the Old World quail, but named for their similar appearance and habits. The American species are in their own family Odontophoridae, whereas Old World quail are in the pheasant family Phasianidae. The family ranges from Canada through to southern Brazil, and two species, the California quail and the bobwhite quail, have been successfully introduced to New Zealand. The stone partridge and Nahan's partridge, both found in Africa, seem to belong to the family. Species are found across a variety of habitats from tropical rainforest to deserts, although few species are capable of surviving at very low temperatures. Thirty-four species are placed in ten genera.

The legs of most New World quails are short but powerful, with some species having very thick legs for digging. They lack the spurs of many Old World galliformes. Although they are capable of short bursts of strong flight New World quails prefer to walk, and will run from danger (or hide), taking off explosively only as a last resort. Plumage varies from dull to spectacular, and many species have ornamental crests or plumes on the head. There is moderate sexual dichromism in plumage, with males having brighter plumage.

Quail

Quail is a collective name for several genera of mid-sized birds generally placed in the order Galliformes.

Old World quail are placed in the family Phasianidae, and New World quail are placed in the family Odontophoridae. The species of buttonquail are named for their superficial resemblance to quail, and form the family Turnicidae in the order Charadriiformes. The king quail, an Old World quail, often is sold in the pet trade, and within this trade is commonly, though mistakenly, referred to as a "button quail". Many of the common larger species are farm-raised for table food or egg consumption, and are hunted on game farms or in the wild, where they may be released to supplement the wild population, or extend into areas outside their natural range. In 2007, 40 million quail were produced in the U.S.The collective noun for a group of quail is a flock, covey, or bevy.

Sibley-Monroe checklist 1

The Sibley-Monroe checklist was a study of birds conducted by Charles Sibley and Burt Monroe. It drew on extensive DNA-DNA hybridisation studies to reassess the relationships between modern birds.

The Sibley-Monroe assignment of individual species to families, and of families to orders remains controversial however. Critics maintain that while it marks a great leap forward so far as the evidence from DNA-DNA hybridisation goes, it pays insufficient attention to other forms of evidence, both molecular and on a larger scale. There is no true consensus, but the broad middle-ground position is that the Sibley-Monroe classification, overall, is "about 80% correct". Research and debate concerning bird classification continue.

There are 9,994 species on the checklist, which is begun below and continues in several parts.

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