Sind–Sagar Railway

The Sind–Sagar Railway was originally constructed as a Metre Gauge railway line from Lala Musa to Malakwal. In 1886 the Sind–Sagar Railway was amalgamated with other railways to form the North Western State Railway and railway line from was converted to broad gauge.[1][1] The Chak Nizam Bridge, also known as Victoria Bridge, was completed in early 1887 over the Jhelum river in Shahpur District and connected Jhelum to Lahore. The NWR Sind-Sagar Branch Line was the new name for the line and continued to be extended with branch lines and designated as part of the 'Frontier Section - Military Line'.[1]

Sind–Sagar Railway
IndustryRailways
SuccessorNorth Western State Railway (NWR)
Founded1881
Defunct1885
Headquarters,
Area served
Punjab, Sindh
ServicesRail transport

Sections

Lala Musa–Malakwal Railway

Malakwal–Khushab Railway

Gharibwal Cement Works Railway

The Gharibwal Cement Works Railway opened in May 1886 as a 27 kilometres (17 mi) 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) railway from Haranpur Junction to Gharibwal. It was built to serve the Gharibwal quarry.[2]

Malakwal–Bhera Railway

Personnel

No staff records are available at the British Library IOR. The following personnel have been identified from various sources as being posted to this railway:

  • James Ramsay, Executive Engineer from the Public Works Department(PWD) was Engineer-in-Chief of the Sind–Sagar Railwayin early 1880's.[4] He was also Engineer-in-Chief of the Chak-Nizam Bridge that was completed in 1887.[5]
  • Frederick Robert Upcott, was Engineer-in-Charge of the Chak-Nizam Bridge as part of the Sind–Sagar Railway that was completed in 1887.[5] The account also adds Mr Boydell, Executive Engineer and Mr J Spence, Sub-Engineer
  • Francis Langford O'Callaghan, 1884–85, posted from State Railways as Chief Engineer, Survey of the Sind–Sagar Railway.[6]
  • Trevredyn Rashleigh Wynne, c.1884, Executive Engineer posted from PWD for 'short stint' to Sind–Sagar Railway.[7]

See also

References

  • The spelling of Scinde, Punjaub & Delhi Railway is variable. Scinde and Punjaub are the spellings adopted in the legislation - see "Government Statute Law Repeals 2012" pages 134-135, paragraphs 3.78-3.83.[8]
  1. ^ a b c " Administration Report on the Railways in India – corrected up to 31st March 1918"; Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta; page 107, pdf page 116; Retrieved 15 Jul 2016
  2. ^ http://odysseuslahori.blogspot.com/2013/08/Malakwal-Gharibwal.html
  3. ^ http://www.irfca.org/articles/ziegler-pakistan7.html
  4. ^ Google Books " India List and India Office List, 1905" page 595 (pdf page 558) Retrieved on 15 Jul 2016
  5. ^ a b Google Books "Kipling’s India: Uncollected Sketches 1884–88" by Rudyard Kipling, pages 215-218; Retrieved on 15 Jul 2016
  6. ^ Institution of Civil Engineers "Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers in Great Britain and Ireland - O'Callaghan, Francis Langford "; Retrieved on 14 Jul 2016
  7. ^ Grace's Guide "Trevredyn Rashleigh Wynne"; Retrieved on 14 Jul 2016
  8. ^ H.M. Government “Statute Law Repeals: Nineteenth Report : Draft Statute Law (Repeals) Bill; April 2012"; pages 134-135, paragraphs 3.78-3.83 Retrieved on 14 Jun 2016

External links

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