Silvia Neid

Silvia Neid (born 2 May 1964) is a retired professional German football player and manager. She is one of the most successful players in German women's football, having won seven national championships and six DFB-Pokal trophies. Between 2005 and 2016, Neid served as the head coach of the Germany women's national football team. She was the FIFA World Women's Coach of the Year in 2010, 2013 and 2016.

Silvia Neid
Silvia Neid desillusioniert nach WM-Aus für Deutschland (kompr)
Neid during a TV interview at the 2011 World Cup
Personal information
Date of birth 2 May 1964 (age 55)
Place of birth Walldürn, West Germany
Height 1.66 m (5 ft 5 12 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1975–1980 SV Schlierstadt
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1980–1983 Klinge Seckach
1983–1985 SSG Bergisch Gladbach
1985–1996 TSV Siegen
National team
1982–1996 Germany 111 (48)
Teams managed
2005–2016 Germany
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Playing career

Neid's career as a player began at SV Schlierstadt, later renamed to Klinge Seckach. She stayed with the club until 1983 when she signed up with SSG Bergisch Gladbach, then the dominant team in German football. She won the double with SSG in 1984, but moved to TSV Siegen after a title-less 1985 season. The club enjoyed its most successful years during Neid's tenure, winning six championships and five cups. When Gerd Neuser stopped coaching Siegen in 1994, Neid requested a transfer to SG Praunheim, but the club refused.[1] Neid retired after the 1996 season.

As a German international, Neid made her debut on 10 November 1982 against Switzerland. She scored two goals in the match, the first of which came just one minute after she had entered the pitch.[2] Neid won the UEFA Women's Championship three times in succession between 1989 and 1995, and reached the final of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. Her last game was at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta against Brazil.[2]

Managerial career

Immediately after retiring from active football, Neid took a coaching job with the German women's national team. She managed the under-19 team, which won the 2004 World Championship and finished runner-up at the Women's Championship under her guidance.

Neid served as assistant manager of the senior national team under Tina Theune-Meyer, before succeeding Theune-Meyer as head coach on 20 June 2005.[3] She coached the team to victory at the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, defeating Brazil 2–0 in the final, and the 2016 Summer Olympics.[4] Neid stepped down as head coach in August 2016.[5]

Managerial record

Team From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Germany (women) 20 June 2005[3] 19 August 2016 169 125 22 22 526 107 +419 073.96

Honours

Player honours

SV Bergisch Gladbach 09
TSV Siegen
Germany Women

Managerial honours

Germany Women
Individual

References

  1. ^ "Silvia Neid, die erfolgreichste deutsche Fußballerin" (in German). biografien-news.blog.de. 22 August 2006. Archived from the original on 14 September 2009. Retrieved 30 July 2009.
  2. ^ a b "Statistics". DFB. Retrieved 30 July 2009.
  3. ^ a b "Neid beerbt Theune-Meyer". kicker (in German). 4 February 2005. Retrieved 26 March 2013.
  4. ^ "Gold for Germany as Neid finishes in style". fifa.com. 19 August 2016.
  5. ^ a b "Silvia Neid's last match as German's coach is for the gold". Associated Press. 19 August 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
1995 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was a football match that took place at Råsunda Stadium in Stockholm, Sweden on 18 June 1995. It pitted Germany and Norway to determine the winner of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. Norway won 2–0 with goals from Hege Riise and Marianne Pettersen.

2007 FIFA Women's World Cup Group A

Group A of the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup was one of four groups of nations competing at the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group's first round of matches began on September 10 and its last matches were played on September 17. Most matches were played at the Hongkou Stadium in Shanghai. Defending champions Germany topped the group, joined in the second round by England, the only team Germany failed to beat.

All times are local (UTC+8)

2010 FIFA Ballon d'Or

The 2010 FIFA Ballon d'Or Gala was the inaugural year for FIFA's awards for the top football players and coaches of the year. The gala is a continuation of the FIFA World Player Gala and a result of merging the FIFA Men's World Player of the Year award with the Ballon d'Or, previously presented by the French media to the top men's player in Europe. The awards ceremony took place on 10 January 2011 in Zürich, Switzerland. The three finalists for each category were announced on 6 December 2010.La Masia, the FC Barcelona academy, achieved a record breaking honor in becoming the first youth academy ever to have all three finalists for the Ballon d'Or in one same year, with Lionel Messi, Andrés Iniesta and Xavi. Messi won the award, his second consecutive Ballon d'Or victory.

Marta won the FIFA Women's World Player of the Year award, her fifth in a row.José Mourinho, Portuguese manager of Real Madrid and previously of Internazionale, was the first winner of the men's FIFA World Coach of the Year award in 2010. The women's version of the award was won by Germany head coach Silvia Neid.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Group A

Group A of the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup consisted of the teams from Germany, Canada, Nigeria and France. The games were played on 26 June, 30 June and 5 July 2011. The top two teams advanced to the knockout stage.

2013 FIFA Ballon d'Or

The 2013 FIFA Ballon d'Or Gala was the fourth year for FIFA's awards for the top football players and coaches of the year. The awards were given out in Zürich on 13 January 2014. The deadline for voting was 15 November 2013 but was extended to 29 November 2013 for the first time in history.

Real Madrid and Portugal winger Cristiano Ronaldo won the Ballon d'Or award as the World Player of the Year. It was his second Ballon d'Or, after winning the award in 2008, as well as his first FIFA Ballon d'Or. With the win, he ended Lionel Messi's domination of the award. Nadine Angerer was announced as the Women's World Player of the Year recipient, while Jupp Heynckes claimed the World Coach of the Year for Men's Football, and Silvia Neid the World Coach of the Year for Women's Football. The ninety-minute ceremony was hosted by Fernanda Lima along with Ruud Gullit.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Group B

Group B of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup consisted of Germany, Ivory Coast, Norway and Thailand. Matches were played from 7 to 15 June 2015.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup knockout stage

The knockout stage of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup began on 20 June and ended with the final match on 5 July 2015. A total of 16 teams competed in this knockout stage.

Doris Fitschen

Doris Fitschen (born 25 October 1968 in Zeven) is a retired German football midfielder.

Together with Martina Voss and Silvia Neid, she is considered the most successful German women's soccer player, having won seven national titles and six DFB trophies. Fitschen competed for Germany at the 1996 and 2000 Summer Olympics.

FIFA World Coach of the Year

The FIFA World Coach of the Year was an association football award given annually to the football coach who is considered to have performed the best in the previous 12 months. It was awarded based on votes from coaches and captains of international teams, as well as journalists from around the world.

The award started in 2010 after France Football's Ballon d'Or and the FIFA World Player of the Year award were merged. José Mourinho was the first winner of the men's FIFA World Coach of the Year award in 2010. The women's version of the award was won by head coach Silvia Neid in 2010. Starting in 2016 this award was replaced with the Best FIFA Football Coach Award.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament – Group F

Group F of the women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was played from 3 to 9 August 2016, and included Australia, Canada, Germany and Zimbabwe. The top two teams advanced to the knockout stage, while the third-placed team Australia also advanced because they were among the two best third-placed teams among all three groups.All times are BRT (UTC−3).

Germany at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Germany women's national football team has represented Germany at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They have won the title twice and were runners-up once. They also reached the fourth place in 1991 and in 2015.

Germany women's national football team

The Germany women's national football team (German: Deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft der Frauen) is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

The German national team is one of the most successful in women's football. They are two-time world champions, having won the 2003 and 2007 tournaments. They are also the only nation to have won both the men's and women's tournament. The team has won eight of the twelve UEFA European Championships, claiming six consecutive titles between 1995 and 2013. Germany is one of the two nations to win both the men's and women's European tournament, along with the Netherlands. Germany has won Olympic gold in 2016, after three consecutive bronze medals at the Women's Olympic Football Tournament, finishing third in 2000, 2004 and 2008. Birgit Prinz holds the record for most appearances and is the team's all-time leading goalscorer. Prinz has also set international records; she has received the FIFA World Player of the Year award three times and is the joint second overall top goalscorer at the Women's World Cup.

Women's football was long met with skepticism in Germany, and official matches were banned by the DFB until 1970. However, the women's national team has grown in popularity since winning the World Cup in 2003, as it was chosen as Germany's Sports Team of the Year. As of July 2019, Germany is ranked 2nd in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

List of UEFA Women's Championship records

This is a list of records of the UEFA Women's Championship and its qualification matches.

SV Bergisch Gladbach 09

SV Bergisch Gladbach 09 is a German association football club from the city of Bergisch Gladbach in North Rhine-Westphalia.

The Best FIFA Football Awards

The Best FIFA Football Awards is an association football award presented annually by the sport's governing body, FIFA, since 2016.The first awarding ceremony was held on 9 January 2017 in Zurich, Switzerland. The award is aimed at reviving the FIFA World Player of the Year, which was merged with France Football 's Ballon d'Or in 2010 to become the FIFA Ballon d'Or in a six-year partnership.

The Best FIFA Football Awards 2016

The Best FIFA Football Awards 2016 were held on 9 January 2017 in Zurich, Switzerland. The Best FIFA Football Awards are the annual recognitions awarded by FIFA to several individuals across different categories, including: best eleven players of the year, known as FIFA FIFPro World XI (awards goalkeeper, best defenders l, midfielders, attackers), FIFA World Coach of the Year for men's and for women's football, best female player of the year, 2nd best male player of the year, and best goal of the year (known as FIFA Puskás Award). The FIFA Fair Play Award is the only award that usually goes to groups or entities instead of individuals.

The selection criteria for the (men's and women's) players of the year were: sporting performance, as well as general conduct on and off the pitch from 20 November 2015 to 22 November 2016. The selection criteria for the coaches of the year were: performance and general behaviour of their teams on and off the pitch from 20 November 2015 to 22 November 2016.

The votes were decided by media representatives, national team coaches, and national team captains. In October 2016, it was announced that the general public would also be allowed to vote. Each group contributed 25% of the overall vote.

The ceremony was hosted by Eva Longoria and Marco Schreyl.

The Best FIFA Football Coach

The Best FIFA Football Coach is an association football award given annually to the football coach who is considered to have performed the best in the previous 12 months.

UEFA Women's Euro 1991

The 1991 UEFA Women's Championship took place in Denmark. It was won by Germany in a final against Norway in a repeat of the previous edition's final. Eighteen teams entered qualifying, which was enough to make the competition the first fully official one, so the name was changed to the UEFA Women's Championship.The tournament served as the European qualifying round for the FIFA Women's World Cup 1991.

UEFA Women's Euro 2013 Group B

Group B of the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 consisted of Germany, the reigning champions, Iceland, Netherlands and Norway. Matches were staged in Kalmar and Växjö from 11–17 July 2013.

Norway won the group and advanced to the knockout stage along with group runners-up Germany. Iceland progressed as one of the best third-placed teams while the Netherlands failed to advance.

Awards
Germany squads

Languages

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