Sidney Wicks

Sidney Wicks (born September 19, 1949) is an American retired professional basketball player. A native of California, he played college basketball for the UCLA Bruins and played professionally in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1971 to 1981. In the NBA he played for the Portland Trail Blazers, Boston Celtics, and San Diego Clippers, earning NBA Rookie of the Year in 1972 as well as four all-star selections. He played for the Trail Blazers from (1971-1976), and had a total of 4 selections as an All-Star From 1972 to 1975.

Sidney Wicks
Sidney Wicks 1971
Wicks being double-teamed in a 1971 game
Personal information
BornSeptember 19, 1949 (age 69)
Los Angeles, California
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Listed weight225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
High schoolAlexander Hamilton
(Los Angeles, California)
College
NBA draft1971 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2nd overall
Selected by the Portland Trail Blazers
Playing career1971–1982
PositionPower forward
Number21, 12
Career history
19711976Portland Trail Blazers
19761978Boston Celtics
19781981San Diego Clippers
1981–1982Reyer Venezia Mestre
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points12,803 (16.8 ppg)
Rebounds6,620 (8.7 rpg)
Assists2,437 (3.2 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2010

Early life

Wicks was born in Los Angeles, on September 19, 1949.[1] He attended Alexander Hamilton High School in Los Angeles, but because of non-qualifying grades in high school, he had to attend Santa Monica College for a year until he could go to his preferred university, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Wicks later earned Academic All-America honors at UCLA in 1971.[2] He earned a degree in sociology from the school.[3]

A 6'8" power forward/center, Wicks was a phenom at UCLA, playing on three straight NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championships from 1969 to 1971, the Bruins' star player on the latter two, being named the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four in 1970, Helms National Co-Player of the Year (1970) USBWA and Sporting News Player of the Year (1971) and two-time consensus All-American in 1970 and 1971. On February 1, 1996, his jersey #35 was retired in a halftime ceremony at UCLA's home court, Pauley Pavilion. Wicks was a 1985 inductee into the UCLA Athletic Hall of Fame and in 2010, was selected to the College Basketball Hall of Fame.

Professional career

Sidney Wicks – Trail Blazers (1)
Wicks in 1972

The Portland Trail Blazers selected Wicks with the second pick of the 1971 NBA draft after paying the Cleveland Cavaliers $250,000 not to select him,[3] and the Dallas Chaparrals chose him in the 1971 ABA draft.[1] After averaging 24.5 points and 11.5 rebounds, Wicks was named NBA Rookie of the Year. He also played in the NBA All-Star Game that season.[1]

Wicks played for the Trail Blazers from 1971 to 1976, earning a total of four selections as an All-Star (1972–1975) and averaging over 20 points per game each of his first four seasons.[1] He holds the Blazers' franchise record for rebounds in a game with 27,[4] and averaged 22.3 points per game and 10.3 rebounds a game in his five years with the team.[3]

In October 1976 he was sold to the Boston Celtics, while Portland went on to win its only NBA championship the next season. Wicks played for the Celtics from 1976 to 1978.[3] Wicks then went to the San Diego Clippers and played there until 1981.[1] Overall, Wicks averaged 16.8 points per game and 8.7 rebounds per game over ten seasons and 760 games.[1] He had four seasons averaging over 20 points per game, and four seasons averaging over 10 rebounds per game, accomplishing both of those feats in the same season three times (1971–72, 1972–73, and 1974–75).[1] His scoring average dropped every year after his rookie season.[3] Following his NBA career he played one season in Italy.[3]

Awards and honors

Later years and family

Following his playing career, he lived for a year in Italy before returning to the United States.[3] He served as an assistant coach at UCLA during Walt Hazzard's four years as head coach.[5] Following coaching he entered the real estate field, living in Atlanta, Florida, and Los Angeles.[3]

At 9 a.m. on May 5, 1989, in Mira Mesa, San Diego, California, Wicks was seriously injured in a car accident. He had been driving a 1974 Cadillac and making a left turn through an intersection when a loaded cement truck, which was approaching the intersection at a perpendicular angle, failed to stop at a red light and struck the driver's side door.[6] Wicks had his ruptured spleen removed at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, California. He also had facial lacerations and minor head injuries. Jeffrey Neal Brown, a 34-year-old Poway resident, was a passenger in Wicks' car, and suffered a mild concussion and facial injuries. He was also treated at Scripps Memorial Hospital. The cement truck was being driven by 30-year-old Harry Arthur Auman, who was not injured in the crash.[7][8]

Wicks was married from 1973 to 1979 and has one daughter, Sibahn Epps.[3] As of 2006, he lived in North Carolina and Los Angeles.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g DatabaseBasketball.com Sidney Wicks page
  2. ^ http://www.uclabruins.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=30500&ATCLID=208268801
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Eggers, Kerry (February 17, 2006). "Wicks keeps NBA life in past". The Portland Tribune. Retrieved July 10, 2009.
  4. ^ Eggers, Kerry (March 25, 2008). "Star on home court". The Portland Tribune. Retrieved July 10, 2009.
  5. ^ JERRY CROWE, "In time of great change, Sidney Wicks helped UCLA stay the same", Los Angeles Times, March 2, 2009
  6. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/1989-05-06/sports/sp-2009_1_cement-truck-sidney-wicks-red-light
  7. ^ LePage, Andrew (May 6, 1989). "Wicks Is Seriously Injured When Truck Hits His Car". Los Angeles Times. p. SD_B1.
  8. ^ Smith, Sam (May 6, 1989). "NBA Notes". Chicago Tribune. p. A7.

External links

1969–70 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team

The 1969–70 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won UCLA's sixth NCAA National Basketball Championship in seven years under head coach John Wooden, despite the departure of Lew Alcindor to the NBA, with a win over Jacksonville.The team was honored 40 years later at half-time of the UCLA-Oregon game on February 27, 2010.

1970 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1970 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1970 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

The 1970 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 7, 1970, and ended with the championship game on March 21 in College Park, Maryland. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. This tournament was notable for the number of small schools that reached the Sweet 16, Elite 8, Final 4, and Championship Game.

UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with an 80–69 victory in the final game over Jacksonville, coached by Joe Williams. Sidney Wicks of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team

The 1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won the National Collegiate Championship again on March 13, 1971, in the Astrodome in Houston, Texas. It became the seventh championship in eight years under head coach John Wooden. UCLA defeated Villanova, 68-62. Villanova's second place finish was vacated later by the NCAA.Smith Barrier, Executive Sports Editor, The Greensboro Daily News and Record wrote: "Mister John Wooden has a watch factory out in Los Angeles. It's a bit different from most Swiss works. They don't make watches, they win 'em."The Bruins' only loss was at Notre Dame, 89-82 on January 23, 1971. The victory against UC Santa Barbara on January 30 was the beginning of UCLA's record 88-game winning streak that stretched into the 1973–74 season.

UCLA averaged 83.5 points per game, while allowed 71.1 points per game to the opponents. Seniors Sidney Wicks and Curtis Rowe were selected to the consensus All-America team.The Bruins won in the NCAA West Regional in Salt Lake City, UT, over BYU (91–73) and Long Beach State (57–55) to advance to the Final Four, where they defeated Kansas (68–60) in the semi-final game.

1971 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1971 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1971–72 Portland Trail Blazers season

The 1971/72 season was the Trail Blazers sophomore season. Geoff Petrie missed 22 games due to injury. Petrie who averaged 24.8 points per game in his rookie season would drop nearly 6 points per game as the Blazers finished with an NBA worst record of 18–64. One of the highlights of the season was Sidney Wicks. He would win the Rookie of the Year with a team best 24.5 points per game.

1973 NBA All-Star Game

GAME 23: in Chicago, January 23, 1973

MVP: Dave Cowens

Coaches: East: Tom Heinsohn, West: Bill Sharman.

1974 NBA All-Star Game

GAME 24: at the Seattle Center Coliseum, January 15, 1974.

MVP: Bob Lanier

Coaches: East: Tom Heinsohn, West: Larry Costello.

1975–76 Portland Trail Blazers season

The 1975–76 season was the sixth season of the Portland Trail Blazers in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Blazers finished at 37–45, one game shy of their franchise high from the previous year. Despite finishing with a better record than the Detroit Pistons of the Midwest Division, the Pistons made the playoffs and the Blazers did not.

1976–77 Boston Celtics season

The 1976–77 Boston Celtics season was the 31st season of the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Even though the Celtics were the defending NBA champions, they were an aging team in transition. 35-year-old Don Nelson retired as a player, but the key contributors left were aging, namely John Havlicek (age 36), Jo Jo White (31), and Paul Silas (33). The Celtics took steps to get younger in the frontcourt by sending Silas to the Denver Nuggets in a three-way that ended up bringing Detroit Pistons forward Curtis Rowe. The Celtics also traded a first-round draft pick to the Portland Trail Blazers for Sidney Wicks. Wicks and Rowe would provide athleticism, the Celtics felt, and, more importantly, allow John Havlicek to return to a sixth-man role and not log as many minutes as in the past.

1977–78 Boston Celtics season

The 1977–78 Boston Celtics season was the 32nd season of the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and was linked to the Buffalo Braves season. While the Braves were struggling on the court, their owner John Y. Brown brokered a deal to take over the legendary Celtics franchise. Celtics owner Irv Levin wanted to move the franchise to California, however, the NBA would not allow him to take the cornerstone franchise out of Boston.NBA lawyer and future commissioner David Stern offered a compromise in which Levin and Brown would swap franchises, so that Levin could take over the Braves and move them to San Diego. Eventually, the owners of the 22 franchises voted 21–1 to approve the deal, and the Braves moved from Buffalo to San Diego. The deal also included a 7-player trade in which the Celtics acquired Nate Archibald, Billy Knight and Marvin Barnes in exchange for Freeman Williams, Kevin Kunnert, Kermit Washington and Sidney Wicks. The Braves would not request a draft pick in the deal, allowing the Celtics to retain the draft rights to future Hall of Famer Larry Bird.The Braves played their last game of the season in Boston. It was one of only three seasons from 1951 to 1993 that the Celtics finished with a losing record. This was the 16th and final season for the legendary John Havlicek. Nobody has played more seasons for the Celtics than Havlicek.

1977–78 Buffalo Braves season

The 1977–78 NBA season was the Braves' eighth and final season in the NBA. Entering the season, the Braves were allowed an escape clause in their lease, because season ticket sales did not reach the set goal of 4,500. The Braves suffered another disappointment as Tiny Archibald (whom they acquired from the New Jersey Nets for George Johnson) was lost for the year due to an Achilles tendon injury in the preseason.The Braves played competitively in November with a respectable .500 record at 10–10. Despite the promising start, the Braves won just nine games over the next three months. While the Braves were struggling on the court, owner John Y. Brown was brokering a deal to take over the legendary Boston Celtics franchise. Celtics owner Irv Levin wanted to move the historic franchise to California. However, the NBA would not allow him to take the cornerstone franchise out of Boston.NBA Lawyer David Stern offered a comprise in which Levin and Brown would swap franchises. The concept was that Levin would take over the Braves and move them to San Diego. The Braves finished in fourth place in the Atlantic Division with a 27–55 (.329) record, and played their last game on April 9, ironically, in Boston. Owners voted 21–1 to approve the deal, and the Braves moved from Buffalo to San Diego; the team was renamed the San Diego Clippers for the 1978–79 season.The deal also included a seven-player trade in which the Celtics acquired Archibald, Billy Knight, and Marvin Barnes. The San Diego-bound Braves received Freeman Williams, back-up center Kevin Kunnert, and power forwards Kermit Washington and Sidney Wicks. The team would not request a draft pick in the deal, allowing the Celtics to retain the draft rights to Larry Bird in 1979.

Australian Rostrum

Rostrum Australia (formerly Australian Rostrum) is an association of Australian public speaking clubs, founded on 21 July 1930. It is the main continuation of the original Rostrum club ("The Rostrum") founded in Manchester, United Kingdom on 21 July 1923. This club's other surviving descendants are "Rochdale Rostrum", a Rostrum club in the Greater Manchester area founded in 1978; and the presently dormant "Wellington Rostrum Club" in New Zealand.

Its early establishment makes Rostrum the longest running public speaking organisation in the world.

Rostrum clubs aim to help their members improve their speaking and meeting skills. They do this primarily through regular club meetings and less frequent competitions.

Australian Rostrum's main national competition for members is the "Sidney Wicks Speaking Competition". This is held roughly every six to eight years. In other years, state and territory competitions are dominant.

Its other main national competition is the annual Rostrum Voice of Youth (VOY). This is open to all high school students. It involves a prepared speech and an impromptu speech.

Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year

The Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year was an annual basketball award given to the most outstanding intercollegiate men's basketball player in the United States. The award was first given following the 1904–05 season and ceased being awarded after the 1978–79 season. It was the first major most valuable player (MVP) award for men's basketball in the United States, and the Helms Athletic Foundation was considered within the basketball community to be the authority on men's college basketball for that era. Thus, the award was viewed as the premier player of the year award one could receive up until the 1960s, at which point the Naismith College Player of the Year and John R. Wooden Award took over as the national season MVP awards.

List of U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards

This article lists U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards. Several different organizations sponsor an award for the nation's top player.

Portland Trail Blazers accomplishments and records

The Portland Trail Blazers are an American professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. The Trail Blazers play in the Northwest Division of the Western Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The franchise entered the NBA in 1970, and is one of two major league franchise in Oregon. The Trail Blazers sold out 814 consecutive home games from 1977 through 1995, the second longest such streak for American professional sports teams which was broken July 9, 2011 by the Dayton Dragons. The team has played their home games at the Moda Center (formerly known as the Rose Garden), since the 1995–96 NBA season. The Trail Blazers are owned by Paul Allen. Since the team joined the NBA in 1970, it has won one NBA championship, three conference championships, six division championships, and has appeared in the NBA playoffs 34 times.The team has advanced to the NBA Finals three times, winning the NBA Championship once, in 1977. The other NBA Finals appearances were in 1990 and 1992. The team has qualified for the playoffs in the majority of its seasons, including a streak of 21 straight appearances from 1983 to 2003. Six Hall of Fame players have played for the Trail Blazers (Lenny Wilkens, Bill Walton, Clyde Drexler, Dražen Petrović, Scottie Pippen, and Arvydas Sabonis), four of whom (Wilkens, Walton, Drexler, and Pippen) were recognized as one of the league's 50 greatest. Bill Walton is the franchise's most decorated player; he was the NBA Finals Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1977, and the regular season MVP the following year. Four Blazer rookies (Geoff Petrie, Sidney Wicks, Brandon Roy. and Damian Lillard) have won the NBA Rookie of the Year award. Two Hall of Fame coaches, Lenny Wilkens and Jack Ramsay, have coached the Blazers, and two others, Mike Schuler and Mike Dunleavy, have won the NBA Coach of the Year award with the team.The Blazers have set several team and individual league records. They are the only team to have held a team scoreless during overtime on two separate occasions. In a game that went to four overtime periods, the Blazers and the Chicago Bulls combined to commit 87 personal fouls. In another four-overtime game, the Blazers and the Utah Jazz collected a combined 106 defensive rebounds. The Blazers set two records against the Golden State Warriors: the record for combined three-point field-goal attempts by both teams and the record for the most three-point field-goal attempts by one player. This page details the all-time statistics, records, and other achievements pertaining to the Portland Trail Blazers.

Portland Trail Blazers all-time roster

The Portland Trail Blazers, commonly known as the Blazers, are an American professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. They play in the Northwest Division of the Western Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Trail Blazers originally played their home games in the Memorial Coliseum, before moving to the Rose Garden (renamed the Moda Center in 2013) in 1995. The franchise entered the league in 1970, and Portland has been its only home city. The franchise has enjoyed a strong following; from 1977 through 1995, the team sold out 814 consecutive home games, the longest such streak in American major professional sports. The Trail Blazers are one of two teams in the major professional North American sports leagues located in the state of Oregon, with the other being the Portland Timbers. The Trail Blazers are also currently the only NBA team based in the binational Pacific Northwest, after the Vancouver Grizzlies relocated to Memphis and became the Memphis Grizzlies in 2001, and the Seattle SuperSonics relocated to Oklahoma City and became the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2008.

The team has advanced to the NBA Finals three times, winning the NBA Championship once, in 1977. The other NBA Finals appearances were in 1990 and 1992. The team has qualified for the playoffs in 34 seasons of their 48-season existence, including a streak of 21 straight appearances from 1983 through 2003, tied for the second longest streak in NBA history. Six Hall of Fame players have played for the Trail Blazers (Lenny Wilkens, Bill Walton, Clyde Drexler, Dražen Petrović, Arvydas Sabonis, and Scottie Pippen). Bill Walton is the franchise's most decorated player; he was the NBA Finals Most Valuable Player in 1977, and the regular season MVP the following year. Four Blazer rookies (Geoff Petrie, Sidney Wicks, Brandon Roy, Damian Lillard) have won the NBA Rookie of the Year award. Two Hall of Fame coaches, Lenny Wilkens and Jack Ramsay, have patrolled the sidelines for the Blazers, and two others, Mike Schuler and Mike Dunleavy, have won the NBA Coach of the Year award with the team.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared in at least one game for the Portland Trail Blazers NBA franchise.

UCLA Bruins men's basketball retired numbers

The men's college basketball program of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) was founded in 1920 and is known competitively as the UCLA Bruins. The Bruins have won 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Men's Division I Basketball Championships, the most of any school. UCLA players have been assigned jersey numbers ranging from 0 to 78 in the team's history. The school no longer issues 10 retired numbers in honor of former players. To qualify, a player must have been a three-time consensus All-American, a consensus national player of the year, or been inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. The retired numbers are displayed in the rafters of the Bruins' home arena, Pauley Pavilion. UCLA's legendary coach John Wooden generally opposed having numbers retired.

Wicks (surname)

Wicks is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Ben Wicks, cartoonist, illustrator, journalist and author

Brian Wicks, a former Australian rules football player

Camilla Wicks, violinist

Chad Wicks, professional wrestler

Charles E. Wicks (1925–2010), professor of chemical engineering

Charles W. Wicks (1862–?), American businessman and politician from New York

Corrinne Wicks, English actress

Eric Wicks, American football player

Erfurt Wicks, East German Army Colonel (Oberst)

Frederick Wicks (1840-1910), author & inventor

John Wicks (singer), music producer and songwriter

Josh Wicks, football goalkeeper

Les Wicks, poet

Malcolm Wicks, a member of Parliament.

Matt Wicks, footballer

Sidney Wicks, basketball player

Steve Wicks, footballer, father of Matt Wicks

Sue Wicks, basketball player

Teal Wicks, American singer and stage actress, best known for her performance as Elphaba in the musical Wicked

Victoria Wicks, actress

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