Sid Gillman

Sidney Gillman (October 26, 1911 – January 3, 2003) was an American football player, coach and executive. Gillman's insistence on stretching the football field by throwing deep downfield passes, instead of short passes to running backs or wide receivers at the sides of the line of scrimmage, was instrumental in making football into the modern game that it is today.

Gillman played football as an end at Ohio State University from 1931 to 1933. He played professionally for one season in 1936 with the Cleveland Rams of the second American Football League. After serving as an assistant coach at Ohio State from 1938 to 1940, Gillman was the head football coach at Miami University from 1944 to 1947 and at the University of Cincinnati from 1949 to 1954, compiling a career college football record of 81–19–2. He then moved to the ranks of professional football, where he headed the NFL's Los Angeles Rams (1955–1959), the American Football League's Los Angeles and San Diego Chargers (1960–1969), and the NFL's Chargers (1971), and Houston Oilers (1973–1974), amassing a career record of 123–104–7 in the National Football League and the American Football League. Gillman's 1963 San Diego Chargers won the AFL Championship. Gillman was inducted as a coach into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1983 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1989. He is the sole coach in the history of American football to have earned both honors.

Sid Gillman
Sid Gillman
Position:End
Personal information
Born:October 26, 1911
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Died:January 3, 2003 (aged 91)
Carlsbad, California
Career information
High school:Minneapolis (MN) North
College:Ohio State
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Head coaching record
Regular season:AFL/NFL: 122–99–7 (.550)
Postseason:AFL/NFL: 1–5 (.167)
Career:AFL/NFL: 123–104–7 (.541)
NCAA: 81–19–2 (.804)
Coaching stats at PFR

Biography

Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Gillman played college football at Ohio State University under coach Sam Willaman, forming the basis of his offense.[1] He was a team captain and All-Big Ten Conference end in 1933.

Always deeply interested in the game, while working as a movie theater usher, he removed football segments from newsreels that the theater would show, so that he could take them home and study them on a projector he had bought. This dedication to filmed football plays made Gillman the first coach to study game footage, something that all coaches do today.[2]

Gillman played one year in the American Football League (1936) for the Cleveland Rams, then became an assistant coach at Denison University, Ohio State University, and was an assistant coach to Earl Blaik of Army, then head coach at Miami University and the University of Cincinnati. His record over 10 years as a college head coach were 81–19–2.

He returned to professional football as a head coach with the Los Angeles Rams, leading the team to the NFL's championship game, and then moved to the American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969), where he coached the Los Angeles and San Diego Chargers to five Western Division titles and one league championship in the first six years of the AFL's existence.

His greatest coaching success came after he was persuaded by Barron Hilton, then the Chargers' majority owner, to become the head coach of the AFL franchise he planned to operate in Los Angeles. When the team's general manager, Frank Leahy, became ill during the Chargers' founding season, Gillman took on additional responsibilities as general manager.

As the first coach of the Chargers, Gillman gave the team a mercurial personality that matched his own.

He had much to do with the AFL being able to establish itself. Gillman was a thorough professional, and in order to compete with him, his peers had to learn pro ways. They learned, and the AFL became the genesis of modern professional football.

"Sid Gillman brought class to the AFL", Oakland Raiders managing general partner Al Davis once said of the man he served under on that first Chargers team. "Being part of Sid's organization was like going to a laboratory for the highly developed science of professional football."

Through Gillman's tenure as head coach, the Chargers went 87–57–6 and won five AFL Western Division titles. In 1963 they captured the only league championship the club ever won by outscoring the Boston Patriots, 51–10, in the American Football League championship game in Balboa Stadium. That game was a measure of Gillman's genius.

He crafted a game plan he entitled "Feast or Famine" that used motion, then seldom seen, to negate the Patriots' blitzes. His plan freed running back Keith Lincoln to rush for 206 yards. In addition to Lincoln, on Gillman's teams through the '60s were these notable players: wide receiver Lance Alworth; offensive tackle Ron Mix; running back Paul Lowe; quarterback John Hadl; and defensive linemen Ernie Ladd and Earl Faison (Alworth and Mix are Hall of Famers). Gillman was one of only two head coaches to hold that position for the entire 10-year existence of the American Football League (the other being fellow Hall of Fame coach Hank Stram, who coached the Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs from 1960 through 1974).

Gillman approached then-NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle in 1963 with the idea of having the champions of the AFL and the NFL play a single final game, but his idea was not implemented until the Super Bowl (originally titled the AFL-NFL World Championship Game) was played in 1967.

Following his tenure with San Diego, he coached the Houston Oilers for two years from 1973 to 1974, helping bring the club out of the funk it had been in for many seasons prior, and closer to playoff contention. He later served as the offensive coordinator for the Chicago Bears in 1977 and as a consultant for Dick Vermeil's Philadelphia Eagles in 1980.[3]

In July 1983, at age 71, Gillman came out of retirement after an offer from Bill Tatham, Sr. and Bill Tatham, Jr., owners of the United States Football League (USFL) expansion team the Oklahoma Outlaws.[4] Gillman agreed to serve as Director of Operations and signed quarterback Doug Williams, who later led the Washington Redskins to victory in Super Bowl XXII. Although Gillman signed a roster of players to play for the Tulsa, Oklahoma-based franchise, he was fired by Tatham six months later in a dispute over finances. He then served as a consultant for the USFL's Los Angeles Express in 1984.

Influence

Gillman's influence on the modern game can be seen by listing the current and former coaches and executives who either played with him or coached for him:

Coaching tree

Numbers indicate Super Bowls won by Gillman's "descendants", a total of twenty-six, including Super Bowl 50 winning coach Gary Kubiak.

Sid Gillman Coaching Tree
Sid Gillman Coaching Tree

Don Coryell, the coach at San Diego State University when Gillman was coaching the San Diego Chargers, would bring his team to Chargers' practices to watch how Gillman ran his practices. Coryell went on to coach in the NFL, and some of his assistants, influenced by the Gillman style, included coaches Joe Gibbs, Ernie Zampese, Tom Bass, and Russ A. Molzahn. A larger and more extended version of Sid Gillman's coaching tree, which in some ways could be called a forest, can be found here.[5]

Honors and death

Gillman was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1983 and into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1989. He is the only head coach in the history of football in America to receive both these honors, each the pinnacle in its level. Upon his death in 2003, Gillman was interred in the Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, California.

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Miami Redskins (Independent) (1944–1947)
1944 Miami 8–1
1945 Miami 7–2
1946 Miami 7–3
1947 Miami 9–0–1 W Sun
Miami: 31–6–1
Cincinnati Bearcats (Mid-American Conference) (1949–1952)
1949 Cincinnati 7–4 4–0 1st
1950 Cincinnati 8–4 3–1 2nd L Sun
1951 Cincinnati 10–1 3–0 1st
1952 Cincinnati 8–1–1 3–0 1st
Cincinnati Bearcats (NCAA University Division independent) (1953–1954)
1953 Cincinnati 9–1
1954 Cincinnati 8–2
Cincinnati: 50–13–1 13–1
Total: 81–19–2
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

AFL/NFL

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
LA 1955 8 3 1 72.7 1st in NFL Western Conference 0 1 0.00 Lost to Cleveland Browns in NFL Championship game
LA 1956 4 8 0 33.3 5th-T in NFL Western Conference - - -
LA 1957 6 6 0 50.0 4th in NFL Western Conference - - -
LA 1958 8 4 0 66.7 2nd-T in NFL Western Conference - - -
LA 1959 2 10 0 20.0 6th in NFL Western Conference - - -
LA Rams Total 28 31 1 47.5 0 1 00.0 1 NFL conference championship
LA Chargers 1960 10 4 0 71.4 1st in AFL West Division 0 1 00.0 Lost to Houston Oilers in AFL championship game
SD 1961 12 2 0 85.7 1st in AFL West Division 0 1 00.0 Lost to Houston Oilers in AFL championship game
SD 1962 4 10 0 28.6 4th in AFL West Division - - -
SD 1963 11 3 0 78.6 1st in AFL West Division 1 0 100.0 Beat Boston Patriots in AFL championship game
SD 1964 8 5 1 61.5 1st in AFL West Division 0 1 0.00 Lost to Buffalo Bills in AFL championship game
SD 1965 9 2 3 81.8 1st in AFL West Division 0 1 0.00 Lost to Buffalo Bills in AFL championship game
SD 1966 7 6 1 53.8 3rd in AFL West Division - - -
SD 1967 8 5 1 61.5 3rd in AFL West Division - - -
SD 1968 9 5 0 64.3 3rd in AFL West Division - - -
SD 1969 8 6 0 57.1 3rd in AFL West Division - - -
LA-SD Chargers AFL Total 86 48 6 63.6 1 4 20.0 1 AFL title, 5 AFL division championships
Hou 1973 1 8 0 11.1 4th in NFL AFC Central - - -
Hou 1974 7 7 0 50.0 2nd in NFL AFC Central - - -
Houston Oilers 8 15 0 34.8 - - -
Professional Total 123 103 7 54.3 1 5 16.7 1 AFL title, 5 AFL division championships, 1 NFL conference championship

See also

References

  1. ^ Peterson, Bill (August 16, 2006). "Cincinnati's Connection to Football's "West Coast Offense"". City Beat. Archived from the original on January 28, 2007. Retrieved September 7, 2006.
  2. ^ Bach, John (January 2001). "Sid Gillman used film to change football while at the University of Cincinnati". University of Cincinnati Magazine. Retrieved September 7, 2006.
  3. ^ Pierson, Don (January 4, 2003). "Sid Gillman 1911-2003". Chicago Tribune.
  4. ^ Oklahoma Outlaws to Join USFL;Chicago Herald;July 8, 1983; Page 22.
  5. ^ "Sid Gillman Coaching Tree". Retrieved December 18, 2014.

External links

1944 Miami Redskins football team

The 1944 Miami Redskins football team was an American football team that represented Miami University as an independent during the 1944 college football season. In its first season under head coach Sid Gillman, Miami compiled an 8–1 record and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 185 to 74. The team won its first eight games before losing to DePauw (7–13). Ned Shiflett was the team captain.

1945 Miami Redskins football team

The 1945 Miami Redskins football team was an American football team that represented Miami University as an independent during the 1945 college football season. In its second season under head coach Sid Gillman, Miami compiled a 7–2 record and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 220 to 72. Paul Dietzel, who later served as the head football coach at LSU, Army, and South Carolina, was the team captain.

1946 Miami Redskins football team

The 1946 Miami Redskins football team was an American football team that represented Miami University as an independent during the 1946 college football season. In its third season under head coach Sid Gillman, Miami compiled a 7–3 record and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 220 to 72. Paul Dietzel was the team captain.

1947 Miami Redskins football team

The 1947 Miami Redskins football team was an American football team that represented Miami University during the 1947 college football season. In their fourth and final season under head coach Sid Gillman, the Redskins compiled a 9–0–1 record, outscored all opponents by a combined total of 240 to 97, and defeated Texas Tech, 13–12, in the 1948 Sun Bowl.Miami University and Western Michigan College were admitted to the MAC in July 1947. Wayne University then resigned from the conference in protest over the admission of schools not located in urban centers. Because Miami and Western Michigan did not schedule a full slate of games against MAC opponents in 1947, they were not eligible to compete for the conference championship.

1954 Cincinnati Bearcats football team

The 1954 Cincinnati Bearcats football team represented the University of Cincinnati as an independent during the 1954 college football season. In their sixth and final season under head coach Sid Gillman, the Bearcats compiled an 8–2 record and outscored opponents by a total of 249 to 107.The 1953 team ended its season on a winning streak, and the 1954 team extended the streak to 16 games. The team reached No. 12 in the AP Poll before losing to Wichita on November 14, 1954.Joe Miller led the team with 717 rushing yards (an average of 7.54 yards per carry) and 66 points scored on 11 rushing touchdowns. The team's other statistical leaders included Mike Murphy with 764 passing yards and Ferd Maccioli with 179 receiving yards.In January 1955, the team's head coach, Sid Gillman, resigned to become the head coach of the Los Angeles Rams in the National Football League. In six years at Cincinnati, Gillman compiled a 50–13–1 record.

1956 Pro Bowl

The 1956 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's sixth annual all-star game which featured top performers from the 1955 season. The game was played on January 15, 1956, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California in front of 37,867 fans. The East squad defeated the West by a score of 31–30.The West team was led by the Los Angeles Rams Sid Gillman while Joe Kuharich of the Washington Redskins' coached the East squad. Chicago Cardinals back Ollie Matson was selected as the game's outstanding player.

1960 Los Angeles Chargers season

The 1960 Los Angeles Chargers season was the team's inaugural season, also the first season of the American Football League (AFL). Head coach Sid Gillman led the Chargers to the AFL Western Division title with a 10–4 record, in the team's only season in Los Angeles until its 2017 return, with its home field at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.The season concluded with the AFL championship game against the Houston Oilers (10–4) of the Eastern Division, held at Jeppesen Stadium in Houston on New Year's Day. The teams had split their two games in the regular season, with the home teams winning, and the host Oilers were 6 1/2-point favorites to win the title. Down by a point after three quarters, the Chargers gave up an 88-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter and lost, 24–16.The Chargers had the right to host for the first ever AFL national championship game at the Los Angeles Coliseum. However as its attendance for home games was falling below 10,000 league and television officials fearing that showing empty seats in the 100,000+ seat Coliseum persuaded the Chargers to give up the advantage and move the game to Houston.Initially denied in December, but announced in late January, owner Barron Hilton relocated the Chargers down the coast to a soon-to-be expanded Balboa Stadium in San Diego for the 1961 season.The Chargers would later return to Los Angeles to rejoin the Rams in 2017, 57 years later.

1965 San Diego Chargers season

The 1965 San Diego Chargers season began with the team trying to improve on their 8–5–1 record in 1964. Head Coach Sid Gillman led the Chargers to their fifth AFL West title, with a 9–2–3 record, before losing the AFL Championship Game to the Buffalo Bills for the second consecutive season. After that season, the Chargers would never make another post-season appearance until nearly a decade after the AFL–NFL merger took place (1979).

Charlie Waller (American football)

Charlie F. Waller (November 26, 1921 – September 5, 2009) was an American Professional Football head coach for the San Diego Chargers from 1969, the last season of the American Football League, to 1970, the first season of the merged National Football League. His total coaching record at the end of his career was 9 wins, 7 losses and 3 ties. Waller was offensive backfield coach and took over for Chargers head coach Sid Gillman on November 14, 1969 after Gillman's resignation due to poor health, Gilman remained as General Manager.

After Gillman's health improved he was named Charger head coach on December 30, 1970 and Waller offensive coach. He is a 1942 graduate of Oglethorpe University and a 1980 inductee in its Athletic Hall of Fame. He was head football coach at Decatur, Georgia High School in the 1940s. In 1951, he joined Ralph Jordan's staff as offensive backfield coach at Auburn University.Waller was later an assistant coach for George Allen and the Washington Redskins.

George Blackburn (American football)

George Edward "Blackie" Blackburn (October 14, 1913 – May 15, 2006) was an American football player, coach, and scout. He served as the head coach at Miami University (1948), the University of Cincinnati (1955–1960), and the University of Virginia (1965–1970), compiling a career college football record of 60–61–7. Blackburn was also an assistant coach under coaching legends Sid Gillman at Miami and Cincinnati and under Earl Blaik at the United States Military Academy.

Harland Svare

Harland James Svare (born November 25, 1930) is an American former professional football player and coach. Svare was a linebacker who played eight seasons with the Los Angeles Rams and New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL) from 1953 to 1960. He was the Rams head coach from midway the 1962 season through 1965, and the San Diego Chargers head coach from 1971 through 1973.

In a November 1972 game, Chargers owner Eugene V. Klein awarded Svare a five-year coaching contract, an unpopular decision; however, Svare left voluntarily during the following season.

History of Los Angeles Chargers head coaches

Sid Gillman coached the Los Angeles and San Diego Chargers to five Western Division titles and one league championship in the first six years of the league's existence.

His greatest coaching success came after he was persuaded by Barron Hilton, then the Chargers' majority owner, to become the head coach of the American Football League franchise he planned to operate in Los Angeles. When the team's general manager, Frank Leahy, became ill during the Chargers' founding season, Gillman took on additional responsibilities as general manager.

As the first coach of the Chargers, Gillman gave the team a personality that matched his own. Gillman's concepts formed the foundation of the so-called "West Coast offense" that pro football teams are still using.

He coached the Los Angeles and San Diego Chargers to five Western Division titles and one league championship in the first six years of the league's existence.

He played college football at Ohio State University under legendary coach Francis "Shut the Gates of Mercy" Schmidt, forming the basis of his "West Coast offense." The term "West Coast Offense," as it is now commonly used, derives from a 1993 Bernie Kosar quote, publicized by Sports Illustrated writer Paul Zimmerman (or "Dr. Z"). Originally the term referred to the "Air Coryell" system used by two west coast teams beginning in the 1970s, the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders. However, a reporter mistakenly applied Kosar's quote about the Air Coryell system to the 1980s-era attack of Walsh's San Francisco 49ers. Initially, Walsh resisted having the term misapplied to his own distinct system, but the moniker stuck. Now the term is also commonly used to refer to pass-offenses that may not be closely related to either the Air Coryell system or Walsh's pass-strategy.

Don Coryell coached the San Diego Chargers from 1978 to 1986. He is well known for his innovations to football's passing offense. Coryell's offense today is commonly known as "Air Coryell". However, the Charger offense lacked the ability to control the clock, resulting in their defense spending too much time on the field. As a result, they fell short of getting to the Super Bowl. He was inducted into the San Diego Chargers Hall of Fame in 1986. Coryell is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. He did not use a playbook.

Al Saunders was the coach for the Chargers from 1986 to 1988 and became a citizen of the United States in 1960, one of the four foreign-born coaches in the NFL. In college played Defensive Back and Wide Receiver for the Spartans of San Jose State University (SJSU) from 1966 to 1968 where he was a three-year starter, team captain, and an Academic All-American.

In the 1970s, Al Saunders joined the coaching staff at USC and San Diego State University (SDSU), whose SDSU Aztecs were then under the control of Head Coach Don Coryell. Saunders would go with Coryell to NFL when Coryell became the head coach of the San Diego Chargers.

Statistics correct as of December 30, 2007, after the end of the 2007 NFL season.

Bobby Ross coached the Chargers from 1992 to 1996, and is the only coach to win awards while coaching the Chargers. In 1992, Ross won the Pro Football Weekly NFL Coach of the Year, the Maxwell Football Club NFL Coach of the Year and the UPI NFL Coach of the Year. The Pro Football Weekly NFL Coach of the Year is presented annually by various news and sports organizations to the National Football League (NFL) head coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. The Maxwell Football Club NFL Coach of the Year was created in 1989 and is originally titled the Earle "Greasy" Neale Award for Professional Coach of the Year. The United Press International (UPI) NFL Coach of the Year award was first presented in 1955. Before the AFL-NFL merger, an award was also given to the most outstanding coach from the AFL. When the leagues merged in 1970, separate awards were given to the best coaches from the AFC and NFC conferences. The UPI discontinued the awards after 1996.

The San Diego Chargers hired Schottenheimer as their 13th head coach on January 29, 2002. Schottenheimer posted a 47–33 record (.588) with the Chargers. His success did not come immediately, as the team posted a 4–12 record in 2003, thereby "earning" the first overall pick in the draft (this was the last time that a team with the worst record in the NFL kept its head coach the following season, even considering the three other 4–12 teams that season replaced their head coaches, Oakland, Arizona, and the New York Giants hiring Norv Turner, Dennis Green, and Tom Coughlin, respectively). He was named NFL Coach Of The Year for the 2004 NFL season. Schottenheimer led the team to two playoff appearances, his 17th and 18th as a head coach. However, both appearances resulted in disappointing losses to the underdog New York Jets in overtime in 2005 and the New England Patriots in 2007, bringing his playoff record to 5–13. Schottenheimer was abruptly fired by San Diego on February 12, 2007. Schottenheimer was fired because of a strained relationship with general manager A.J. Smith, which reached a breaking point when four assistants (Cam Cameron, Wade Phillips, Rob Chudzinski and Greg Manusky) left for positions with other teams.There have only been four coaches to lead the team into the playoffs. Bobby Ross holds the best record percentage wise in the playoffs. Norv Turner holds the best regular season coaching record, with 0.640, followed by Hall of Famer Sid Gillman with 0.608. Ron Waller holds the worst regular season record, winning just one out of the six games he coached.

Jacque MacKinnon

Jacque Harold MacKinnon (November 10, 1938 – March 6, 1975) was an American football player. A tight end, he played college football for Colgate University, and professionally for the American Football League's San Diego Chargers from 1961 through 1969. He also played one year for the National Football League's Oakland Raiders. He was on the Chargers' 1963 AFL Championship team in their victory over the Boston Patriots. He was an AFL All-Star in 1966 and 1968. As the last player selected in the 1961 NFL Draft, he was designated Mr. Irrelevant, however, he is the only such player ever to be eventually selected as an All-Star. Chargers head coach, Sid Gillman, employed MacKinnon with Dave Kocourek in the first "twin tight-end" formations seen in professional football.

Born and raised in Dover, New Jersey, MacKinnon attended Dover High School.MacKinnon was out of football when he died in 1975. After fleeing the scene of a car accident and apparently drunk, MacKinnon jumped over a tall fence, not knowing about the construction site on the other side. MacKinnon fell some 30 feet and died of injuries caused by the fall.

Jesse Murdock

Jesse Murdock, Jr. (September 17, 1938 – September 25, 1965) was an American collegiate and Professional Football player. After graduating from California Western University he served in the United States Marine Corps (1958 to 1961), then tried out for the American Football League's San Diego Chargers in 1963. After being released by the Chargers' Sid Gillman during training camp, he played for the AFL's Oakland Raiders and Buffalo Bills in the 1963 AFL season.

Murdock was killed in an automobile accident on September 25, 1965, and was buried with full military honors at the Golden Gate National Cemetery, San Bruno, California.

List of Cincinnati Bearcats head football coaches

The Cincinnati Bearcats football team represents the University of Cincinnati in the East Division of the American Athletic Conference (AAC), competing as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS). The program has had 39 head coaches and three interim coaches during its existence, as well as one stint with no coach and two periods with the program on hiatus. The Bearcats have been participating in college football since the 1885 season and were one of the first schools currently in the FBS to sponsor a football program. Luke Fickell is the current head coach; he replaced Tommy Tuberville following the latter's resignation at the end of the 2016 season.The program's current nickname, "Bearcats", was first used in 1914 and was formally adopted in 1919. Prior to then, common terms like "Varsity" or "Red and Black" (the team's colors) had been used to refer to the football team. The Bearcats have played in more than 1200 games during the program's 129 seasons (through the 2017 regular season). In that time, nine coaches have led the Bearcats in a post-season bowl game, eight have won a conference championship, and four have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.Rick Minter currently holds several records among Cincinnati coaches, including most games coached (117), seasons coached (10), games won (53), games lost (63), conference wins (23), and conference losses (30). Minter also holds, along with Tuberville and Brian Kelly, the record for most bowl games coached (3). Sid Gillman guided the Bearcats to three Mid-American Conference (MAC) championships, the most of any Cincinnati coach in any conference. Gillman also has the best conference win percentage of any coach (.929); Tom Fennell's .864 is the best regular season percentage, while Kelly's .850 leads among multi-season coaches. Only one interim coach, Steve Stripling, has won a game in that position.

List of Los Angeles Chargers head coaches

The Los Angeles Chargers are a professional American football team based in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Chargers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. There have been 15 coaches in Los Angeles Chargers franchise history, including Sid Gillman, who coached the Los Angeles Chargers' first and only season in 1960 before the team's move to San Diego, California in 1961.

List of Miami RedHawks head football coaches

The Miami RedHawks football program is a college football team that represents Miami University in the Mid-American Conference (MAC) in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team has had 35 head coaches and 2 interim coaches since it started playing organized football in 1888 and was originally known by the nickname Redskins before changing to RedHawks in 1997. Miami competed indepent of conferences at various point in its history, but also held memberships in the Ohio Athletic Conference (1911 − 1927), and Buckeye Conference (1928 − 1938) before joining the MAC in 1947. The RedHawks have played in 1,183 games during their 129 seasons. Nine coaches have led the RedHawks to postseason bowl games: Sid Gillman, Woody Hayes, John Pont, Bill Mallory, Dick Crum, Tim Rose, Terry Hoeppner, Michael Haywood, and Chuck Martin. Fourteen coaches have won conference championships with the RedHawks: three for the OAC, one for the Buckeye, and ten for the MAC . No Miami coach has led the RedHawks to a national championship. As of the end of the 2017 season, Randy Walker is the all-time leader in games coached (99) and wins (59), while Frank Wilton is the all-time leader years coached (10). C. K. Fauver leads the RedHawks in winning percentage with a perfect 1.000 in his one season at Miami. Among coaches with more than two seasons of tenure, George Little has the highest winning percentage, .875, and Don Treadwell has the lowest winning percentage, with a record of 8-21 (.276) in roughly two and half seasons.

Of the 35 RedHawks coaches, five have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Little, Gillman, Hayes, Ara Parseghian, and Bo Schembechler. These men and the number of high-caliber player coaches the school has produced gave rise to its nickname as a "Cradle of Coaches". No coach has received National Coach of the Year honors. On December 3, 2013, Miami hired Martin, who remains the current head coach as of December 2018.

List of Tennessee Titans head coaches

The Tennessee Titans, previously known as the Houston Oilers, are a professional American football team based in Nashville, Tennessee. They are a member of the South division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The Tennessee Titans have had 18 head coaches in its franchise history. As the Houston Oilers based in Houston, Texas, the team began playing in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL). The Oilers won two AFL championships before joining the NFL as part of the AFL-NFL merger. The team relocated to Tennessee in 1997 and played in Memphis for one season before moving to Nashville. For two seasons, the team was known as the Tennessee Oilers before changing its name to the Titans in 1999.The Titans are currently searching for the next head coach after parting ways with Mike Mularkey, who was originally hired as tight ends coach in 2014, promoted to assistant head coach in 2015, and replaced Ken Whisenhunt on an interim basis after a 1-6 start in 2015. He was named full-time to the position in January 2016. In addition to Mularkey and Whisenhunt, The Titans have also been coached by Mike Munchak and Jeff Fisher, who led the Titans to their only Super Bowl appearance in Super Bowl XXXIV following the 1999 season.

Tom Bass (American football)

Tom Bass is a retired American football coach who spent 30 years as an assistant with the Cincinnati Bengals, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and San Diego Chargers. He played at San Jose State University as a lineman until a bout of polio left him unable to play football. He then served as an undergraduate coach, and upon graduation, as the only full time assistant under Don Coryell. He later worked on the Chargers staff with Sid Gillman, coaching QB’s with John Hadal, he was the first Coach hired by Coach Paul Brown on the inaugural Bengals staff, and the Buccaneers staff under John McKay. He joined the Buccaneers in their inaugural season as their director of pro scouting, and unofficially took over the offensive coordinator role when John Rauch resigned. By the next season, he had become the team's defensive coordinator. He is credited with designing the Tampa Bay defense that ranked at or near the top of the league from 1978 to 1981. He left Tampa Bay before the 1982 NFL season to join the Chargers, tasked with improving their league-last pass defense. He was also noted for teaching clinics to help female fans understand the game of football, and for having written two volumes of poetry. He has published several books of football drills and instructional techniques.

Sid Gillman—championships, awards, and honors

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