Si Johnson

Silas Kenneth Johnson (October 5, 1906 – May 12, 1994) was an American professional baseball player, a right-handed pitcher who appeared in 492 Major League games pitched over 17 seasons for the Cincinnati Reds (1928–36), St. Louis Cardinals (1936–38), Philadelphia Phillies (1940–43 and 1946) and Boston Braves (1946–47). He was born in Danway, near Ottawa, Illinois, and was listed as 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and 185 pounds (84 kg).

Johnson led the National League in losses in 1931 (19) and 1934 (22). He also led the National League in earned runs allowed (125) in 1934.

Missing the 1944–45 baseball seasons, Johnson served with the US Navy during World War II.[1][2]

In 17 seasons Johnson had a 101–165 win–loss record, 492 games, 272 games started, 108 complete games, 13 shutouts, 115 games finished, 15 saves, 2,281​13 innings pitched, 2,510 hits allowed, 1,226 runs allowed, 1,036 earned runs allowed, 120 home runs allowed, 687 walks allowed, 840 strikeouts, 36 hit batsmen, 26 wild pitches, 9,903 batters faced, 3 balks and a 4.09 ERA.

Johnson remained in baseball for two seasons after his active career ended, serving as batting practice pitcher and then pitching coach of the Braves (1948–49); he was a member of Boston's 1948 National League champions. He died in Sheridan, Illinois at the age of 87.[3]

Si Johnson
Pitcher
Born: October 5, 1906
Danway, Illinois
Died: May 12, 1994 (aged 87)
Sheridan, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 11, 1928, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
September 25, 1947, for the Boston Braves
MLB statistics
Win–loss record101–165
Earned run average4.09
Strikeouts840
Teams

References

  1. ^ "Baseball in Wartime – Those Who Served A to Z". BaseballinWartime.com. Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  2. ^ Si Johnson at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by Matthew Clifford, Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  3. ^ "Si Johnson". NorwegianAmerican.com. Archived from the original on July 24, 2010. Retrieved September 19, 2017.

External links

1929 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1929 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 66–88, 33 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1931 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1931 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 58–96, 43 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1931 Major League Baseball season

The 1931 Major League Baseball season.

1932 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1932 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 60–94, 30 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1934 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1934 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 52–99, 42 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals. Their .344 winning percentage remains the lowest in franchise history since 1900, and the 99 losses were the worst in the franchise history until the 1982 Reds lost 101 games. Because the schedule did not have 162 games at this time, and the Reds only won 52 games this season compared to 1982, when they lost 101 games, when at the same time winning 61 games, nine more than this team, the 1934 Reds are actually a weaker team than the 1982 team, thus making this team the worst in franchise history overall.

1935 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1935 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 68–85, 31½ games behind the Chicago Cubs. The highlight of the season was the first night game in Major League baseball history when the Reds behind the arm of Paul Derringer prevailed over the Philadelphia Phillies 2-1 under the lights at Crosley Field in Cincinnati.

1936 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1936 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 74–80, 18 games behind the New York Giants.

1936 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1936 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 55th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 45th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 87–67 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League.

1938 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1938 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 57th season in St. Louis, Missouri, United States, and the 47th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 71–80 during the season and finished 6th in the National League.

1940 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1940 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 58th season in the history of the franchise. The team, managed by Doc Prothro, began their third season at Shibe Park and were picked by 73 of 76 writers in the pre-season Associated Press poll of baseball writers to finish last. The Phillies lost 103 games and finished last, 50 games behind the pennant-winning Cincinnati Reds.

1941 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1941 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 43 wins and 111 losses.

On July 1, the Phillies played the Dodgers in Brooklyn; the game was televised by WNBT in New York (now WNBC), making the ballgame the first program aired by a commercial TV station in the United States. Although the Phillies finished dead last and the Dodgers later won the pennant, Philadelphia won the game 6–4, in 10 innings.

1942 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1942 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 60th season in the history of the franchise. The team, managed by Hans Lobert, began their fifth season at Shibe Park. Prior to the season, the team shortened the team nickname to 'Phils'. Of the change, a baseball writer opined prior to the season, "the gag is they wanted to get the 'lie' out of their name."

1943 Philadelphia Phillies season

Lumber baron William B. Cox purchased the team in 1943. On March 9, Cox announced that the team would officially be called the "Phillies" again after former-President Gerald Nugent had named them "Phils" prior to the 1942 season.In 1943, the team rose out of the standings cellar for the first time in five years. The fans responded with an increase in attendance. Eventually, it was revealed by Cox that he had been betting on the Phillies, and he was banned from baseball. The new owner, Bob Carpenter, Jr., tried to polish the team's image by unofficially changing the name to the "Blue Jays"; however, the new moniker did not take, and it was quietly dropped by 1949.

1946 Boston Braves season

The 1946 Boston Braves season was the 76th season of the franchise.

1947 Boston Braves season

The 1947 Boston Braves season was the 77th season of the franchise.

1949 Boston Braves season

The 1949 Boston Braves season was the 79th season of the franchise.

List of Cincinnati Reds Opening Day starting pitchers

The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Cincinnati who play in the National League's Central Division. In their history, the franchise also played under the names Cincinnati Red Stockings and Cincinnati Redlegs. They played in the American Association from 1882 through 1889, and have played in the National League since 1890. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor that is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Reds have used 76 Opening Day starting pitchers since they began play as a Major League team in 1882.

The Reds have played in several different home ball parks. They played two seasons in their first home ball park, Bank Street Grounds, and had one win and one loss in Opening Day games there. The team had a record of six wins and ten losses in Opening Day games at League Park, and a record of three wins and seven losses in Opening Day games at the Palace of the Fans. The Reds played in Crosley Field from 1912 through the middle of the 1970 season, and had a record of 27 wins and 31 losses in Opening Day games there. They had an Opening Day record of 19 wins, 11 losses and 1 tie from 1971 through 2002 at Riverfront Stadium, and they have a record of three wins and six losses in Opening Day games at their current home ball park, the Great American Ball Park. That gives the Reds an overall Opening Day record of 59 wins, 66 losses and one tie at home. They have a record of three wins and one loss in Opening Day games on the road.Mario Soto holds the Reds' record for most Opening Day starts, with six. Tony Mullane, Pete Donohue and Aaron Harang have each made five Opening Day starts for the Reds. José Rijo and Johnny Cueto have each made four Opening Day starts for Cincinnati, while Ewell Blackwell, Tom Browning, Paul Derringer, Art Fromme, Si Johnson, Gary Nolan, Jim O'Toole, Tom Seaver, Bucky Walters and Will White each made three such starts for the Reds. Harang was the Reds' Opening Day starting pitcher every season from 2006–2010. Among the Reds' Opening Day starting pitchers, Seaver and Eppa Rixey have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.The Reds have won the World Series championship five times, in 1919, 1940, 1975, 1976 and 1990. Dutch Ruether was the Reds' Opening Day starting pitcher in 1919, Derringer in 1940, Don Gullett in 1975, Nolan in 1976 and Browning in 1990. The Reds won all five Opening Day games in seasons in which they won the World Series. In addition, prior to the existence of the modern World Series, the Reds won the American Association championship in 1882. White was their Opening Day starting pitcher that season, the franchise's first. Jack Billingham started one of the most famous Opening Day games in Reds history on April 4, 1974 against the Atlanta Braves. In that game, Billingham surrendered Hank Aaron's 714th career home run, which tied Babe Ruth's all time home run record.

Rock Island Islanders

The Rock Island Islanders were a minor league baseball team based in Rock Island, Illinois, one of the Quad Cities. The Islanders played on and off from 1883 to 1937 for 37 seasons. The Islanders played their home games at Douglas Park.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.