Show business

Show business, sometimes shortened to show biz or showbiz (since c. 1945),[4] is a vernacular term for all aspects of the entertainment industry.[4] From the business side (including managers, agents, producers, and distributors), the term applies to the creative element (including artists, performers, writers, musicians, and technicians) and was in common usage throughout the 20th century, although the first known use in print dates from 1850.[5][6][7] At that time and for several decades, it typically included an initial the.[4] By the latter part of the century, it had acquired a slightly arcane quality associated with the era of variety, but the term is still in active use. In modern entertainment industry, it is also associated with the great fashion industry (creating trend and fashion) and acquiring intellectual property rights from the invested research in the entertainment business.[8]

Times Square 1-2
Times Square in New York City, the hub of the Broadway theater district[1] and one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections[2][3]

Industry

The global media and entertainment (M&E) market, including motion pictures, television programs and commercials, streaming content, music and audio recordings, broadcast, radio, book publishing, video games, and ancillary services and products) was worth $1.72 trillion in 2015, $1.9 trillion in 2016, with extrapolations ranging to $2.14 trillion by 2020. About one third of the total ($735 billion in 2017) is made up by the U.S. entertainment industry, the largest M&E in the world. [9][10][11]

Sectors and companies

The entertainment sector can be split up into the following subsectors:

ISIC

The industry segment is covered by class "R" of the International Standard Industrial Classification: "Arts, entertainment and recreation"

See also

References

  1. ^ Ken Bloom (2004). Broadway: Its History, People, and Places : an Encyclopedia. Taylor & Francis. pp. 322–. ISBN 978-0-415-93704-7.
  2. ^ Pramis, Joshua (October 2011). "World's Most-Visited Tourist Attractions No. 1: Times Square, New York City". American Express Publishing Corporation. Archived from the original on 1 February 2015. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  3. ^ "The Most Jivin' Streetscapes in the World". Luigi Di Serio. 2010. Archived from the original on 21 September 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  4. ^ a b c Oxford English Dictionary 2nd Ed. (1989)
  5. ^ The term is used to describe any and every aspect of the entertainment industry, with the "show" being the forms of entertainment and "business" being the goings on behind the scenes of those entertainment events
  6. ^ "Slanguage Dictionary". Variety. Archived from the original on 18 December 2015. Retrieved 20 December 2015.
  7. ^ T. Ford (1850) Peep behind Curtain vii. 26 (cited by the OED)
  8. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 September 2013. Retrieved 14 July 2017.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "U.S. entertainment and media industry 2011-2020 - Statistic". Statista.
  10. ^ https://www.selectusa.gov/media-entertainment-industry-united-states
  11. ^ https://www.trade.gov/topmarkets/pdf/Top%20Markets%20Media%20and%20Entertinment%202017.pdf
Aaron Neville

Aaron Joseph Neville (born January 24, 1941) is an American R&B and soul vocalist and musician. He has had four platinum albums and four Top 10 hits in the United States, including three that went to #1 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart. His debut single, from 1966, was #1 on the Soul chart for five weeks.

He has also recorded with his brothers Art, Charles and Cyril as The Neville Brothers and is the father of singer/keyboards player Ivan Neville. Neville is of mixed African-American, Caucasian, and Native American (Choctaw) heritage.

Annie Get Your Gun (musical)

Annie Get Your Gun is a musical with lyrics and music by Irving Berlin and a book by Dorothy Fields and her brother Herbert Fields. The story is a fictionalized version of the life of Annie Oakley (1860–1926), a sharpshooter who starred in Buffalo Bill's Wild West, and her romance with sharpshooter Frank E. Butler (1847–1926).The 1946 Broadway production was a hit, and the musical had long runs in both New York (1,147 performances) and London, spawning revivals, a 1950 film version and television versions. Songs that became hits include "There's No Business Like Show Business", "Doin' What Comes Natur'lly", "You Can't Get a Man with a Gun", "They Say It's Wonderful", and "Anything You Can Do."

Cindy Williams

Cynthia Jane "Cindy" Williams (born August 22, 1947) is an American actress best known for her role as Shirley Feeney on the television sitcom Laverne & Shirley (1976–1982).

Diva

A diva (; Italian: [ˈdiːva]) is a celebrated female singer; a woman of outstanding talent in the world of opera, and by extension in theatre, cinema and popular music. The meaning of diva is closely related to that of prima donna. Diva can also refer to a woman, especially one in show business, with a reputation for being temperamental, demanding, or difficult to work with.

High Voltage (1975 album)

High Voltage is the debut studio album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, released only in Australia, on 17 February 1975.

Hirsutism

Hirsutism is excessive body hair in men and women on parts of the body where hair is normally absent or minimal. It may refer to a male pattern of hair growth that may be a sign of a more serious medical condition, especially if it develops well after puberty. Hirsutism can cause much psychological distress and social difficulty. Facial hirsutism often leads to the avoidance of social situations and to symptoms of anxiety and depression.Hirsutism is usually the result of an underlying endocrine imbalance, which may be adrenal, ovarian, or central. It can be caused by increased levels of androgen hormones. The amount and location of the hair is measured by a Ferriman-Gallwey score. It is different from hypertrichosis, which is excessive hair growth anywhere on the body.Treatments may include birth control pills that contain estrogen and progestin, antiandrogens, or insulin sensitizers.Hirsutism affects between 5–15% of all women across all ethnic backgrounds. Depending on the definition and the underlying data, estimates indicate that approximately 40% of women have some degree of unwanted facial hair.

Jackie Jackson

Sigmund Esco "Jackie" Jackson (born May 4, 1951) is an American singer and songwriter best known as a founding member of the Jackson 5. Jackie is the second child of the Jackson family and the oldest Jackson brother.

Jackson family

The Jackson family is an American family of musicians from Gary, Indiana. Performing as members of The Jackson 5 and as solo artists, the children of Joseph Walter and Katherine Esther Jackson have been successful in the field of popular music from the late 1960s onwards.

As a group, the eldest sons Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon, Michael, and later with the inclusion of Randy, The Jackson 5 became known as the "First Family of Soul" (a title first held by the Five Stairsteps). Regarded as the most popular members of the Jackson family are Michael, who is dubbed as the "King of Pop", and Janet. They both had highly successful solo careers and are often regarded as one of the most influential pop and R&B artists of all time. The continued success of Michael and Janet's careers as solo artists led the Jackson's to become known as the "Royal Family of Pop". All nine of the Jackson siblings have gold records to their credits with La Toya holding the distinction of being the first Jackson sister to attain one (awarded by France's SNEP for "Reggae Night", a song she co-wrote for Jimmy Cliff). Janet is the first black woman to receive the Billboard Icon Award.

The Jacksons have continued to be one of the most influential families in the United States and in recent years some family members have been honored for their work; in 1997 The Jackson 5 was inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Michael was inducted as a solo artist in 2001, making him one of the few people who have been inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice. The Jacksons, Michael and Janet all received stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1980, 1984 and 1990 respectively. Joseph was recognized as "the best musical businessman of all time" by the city of Cleveland in 2002. In 2009 a new series from A&E entitled The Jacksons: A Family Dynasty premiered documenting the Jackson brothers dealing with the sudden loss of Michael and preparing for a Jackson 5 Reunion tour.

James Brown

James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006) was an American singer, songwriter, dancer, musician, record producer and bandleader. A progenitor of funk music and a major figure of 20th-century music and dance, he is often referred to as the "Godfather of Soul". In a career that lasted 50 years, he influenced the development of several music genres.Brown began his career as a gospel singer in Toccoa, Georgia. He joined an R&B vocal group, the Gospel Starlighters (which later evolved into the Famous Flames) founded by Bobby Byrd, in which he was the lead singer. First coming to national public attention in the late 1950s as a member of the singing group The Famous Flames with the hit ballads "Please, Please, Please" and "Try Me", Brown built a reputation as a tireless live performer with the Famous Flames and his backing band, sometimes known as the James Brown Band or the James Brown Orchestra. His success peaked in the 1960s with the live album Live at the Apollo and hit singles such as "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag", "I Got You (I Feel Good)" and "It's a Man's Man's Man's World".

During the late 1960s, Brown moved from a continuum of blues and gospel-based forms and styles to a profoundly "Africanized" approach to music-making that influenced the development of funk music. By the early 1970s, Brown had fully established the funk sound after the formation of the J.B.s with records such as "Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine" and "The Payback". He also became noted for songs of social commentary, including the 1968 hit "Say It Loud – I'm Black and I'm Proud". Brown continued to perform and record until his death from pneumonia in 2006. Brown was inducted into 1st class of the National Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame in 2013 as an artist and then in 2017 as a songwriter.

Brown recorded 17 singles that reached No. 1 on the Billboard R&B charts. He also holds the record for the most singles listed on the Billboard Hot 100 chart which did not reach No. 1. Brown has received honors from many institutions, including inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Songwriters Hall of Fame. In Joel Whitburn's analysis of the Billboard R&B charts from 1942 to 2010, Brown is ranked No. 1 in The Top 500 Artists. He is ranked No. 7 on Rolling Stone's list of its 100 greatest artists of all time. Rolling Stone has also cited Brown as the most sampled artist of all time.

Joe Jackson (manager)

Joseph Walter Jackson (July 26, 1928 – June 27, 2018) was an American talent manager and patriarch of the Jackson family of entertainers that includes his children Michael and Janet. He was inducted into the Rhythm and Blues Music Hall of Fame as a member of the class of 2014.

Kate Hudson

Kate Garry Hudson (born April 19, 1979) is an American actress, singer, author and fashion designer. She rose to prominence for her performance in the film Almost Famous (2000), for which she won a Golden Globe and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Her other films include How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days (2003), Raising Helen (2004), The Skeleton Key (2005), You, Me and Dupree (2006), Fool's Gold (2008), Bride Wars (2009), Nine (2009), and Deepwater Horizon (2016).

Hudson co-founded the fitness brand and membership program, Fabletics, operated by JustFab. In 2016, Hudson released her first book, Pretty Happy: Healthy Ways to Love Your Body, and in 2017, she released her second book, Pretty Fun: Creating and Celebrating a Lifetime of Tradition.

Louie Spence's Showbusiness

Louie Spence's Showbusiness was a docusoap follow-up series to the hit show Pineapple Dance Studios. After initially indicating that a second series of Pineapple Dance Studios would be produced, Sky1 reverted this decision due to failing to come to terms with studio owner Debbie Moore. Louie Spence's Showbusiness had the same format as its predecessor Pineapple Dance Studios and continued, among other things, to follow Pineapple Studios and its characters such as Louie Spence, Andrew Stone and Tricia Walsh-Smith, although Walsh-Smith did not return until episode eight, despite being featured in the opening titles. The show ran for twelve episodes, and ended after one series.

Marie Osmond

Olive Marie Osmond (born October 13, 1959) is an American singer, actress, author, philanthropist, talk show host and a member of the show business family the Osmonds. Although she was never part of her family's singing group, she gained success as a solo country music artist in the 1970s and 1980s. Her best known song is a remake of the country pop ballad "Paper Roses". From 1976 to 1979, she and her singer brother Donny Osmond hosted the television variety show Donny & Marie. Osmond is set to premiere as new co-host on The Talk in 2019.

Marlon Jackson

Marlon David Jackson (born March 12, 1957) is an American entertainer, singer, and dancer. Jackson was a member of the Jackson 5; and he is the sixth child of the Jackson family.

Moe Howard and the Three Stooges

Moe Howard and the Three Stooges is the autobiography of Moe Howard of The Three Stooges. He spent his final days writing his autobiography, which he tentatively titled I Stooged to Conquer. However, Howard fell ill with lung cancer in May 1975 and died before it could be completed.

Howard's daughter Joan Howard Maurer completed her father's book and it was eventually published in 1977. While some of the dates and incidents are portrayed differently in other books about the Stooges and their history, this offers insight on the world from Moe Howard's point of view.

The autobiography was re-released in July 2013 by Chicago Review Press as I Stooged to Conquer. The name change reflected the intended, original title of the book, which was changed by the publisher shortly before it went to press in 1977.

Standing ovation

A standing ovation is a form of applause where members of a seated audience stand up while applauding after extraordinary performances of particularly high acclaim. In Ancient Rome returning military commanders (such as Marcus Licinius Crassus after his defeat of Spartacus) whose victories did not quite meet the requirements of a triumph but which were still praiseworthy were celebrated with an ovation instead, from the Latin ovo, "I rejoice". The word's use in English to refer to sustained applause dates from at least 1831.Standing ovations are considered to be a special honor. Often it is used at the entrance or departure of a speaker or performer, where the audience members will continue the ovation until the ovated person leaves or begins their speech.

Some audience members worldwide have observed that the standing ovation has come to be devalued, such as in the field of politics, in which on some occasions standing ovations may be given to political leaders as a matter of course, rather than as a special honour in unusual circumstances. Examples include party conferences in many countries, where the speech of the party leader is rewarded with a "stage managed" standing ovation as a matter of course, and the State of the Union Address of the President of the United States (see ovations at 6:15 and 7:00 here on YouTube). It is routine, rather than exceptional, for this address to be introduced, interrupted and followed by standing ovations, both from the President's own party and his political opponents. However, by tradition all ovations that occur before the speech begins, as opposed to those that interrupt it, are given in praise of the office itself, rather than the individual office-holder, and the President is never introduced by name.

Standing ovations are also often given in a sporting context to reflect an outstanding individual performance.

There's No Business Like Show Business

"There's No Business Like Show Business" is an Irving Berlin song, written for the 1946 musical Annie Get Your Gun and orchestrated by Ted Royal. The song, a slightly tongue-in-cheek salute to the glamour and excitement of a life in show business, is sung in the musical by members of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show in an attempt to persuade Annie Oakley to join the production. It is reprised three times in the musical.

The song is also featured in the 1954 movie of the same name, where it is notably sung by Ethel Merman as the main musical number. The movie, directed by Walter Lang, is essentially a catalog of various Berlin's pieces, in the same way that Singin' in the Rain—which starred Donald O'Connor as well—was a collection of Arthur Freed songs. There was also a disco version of the song made during the 1970s, with Merman reprising her singing role in The Ethel Merman Disco Album. The song became one of Ethel Merman's standards and was often performed by her at concerts and on television.

Other singers to have recorded the song include Judy Garland, The Andrews Sisters (with Bing Crosby and Dick Haymes), Frank Sinatra, Harry Connick Jr. (from Come by Me, 1999), Susannah McCorkle, Mary Hopkin, and Bernadette Peters. The Andrews Sisters version with Bing Crosby and Dick Haymes was recorded on March 19, 1947 and was the only version to reach the Billboard charts, albeit briefly at No. 25.In his liner notes for Susannah McCorkle's version of the song on her Ballad Essentials album Scott Yanow writes "usually performed as a corny razzle-dazzle romp, that piece was drastically slowed down by Susannah who performed all of its known lyrics, including stanzas that show Irving Berlin's lyrics were actually quite touching and meaningful".

Tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins did a rendition of the tune on his 1956 Prestige album, Work Time.

There's No Business Like Show Business (film)

Irving Berlin's There's No Business Like Show Business is a 1954 20th Century-Fox DeLuxe Color musical-comedy-drama in CinemaScope, directed by Walter Lang. It stars an ensemble cast, consisting of Ethel Merman, Dan Dailey, Donald O'Connor, Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Johnnie Ray, and Richard Eastham.

The title is borrowed from the famous song in the stage musical (and MGM film) Annie Get Your Gun. The screenplay was written by Phoebe Ephron and Henry Ephron, based on a story by Lamar Trotti; and the movie was Fox's first musical in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color.Donald O'Connor later called the film the best picture he ever made.

Tito Jackson

Toriono Adaryll "Tito" Jackson (born October 15, 1953) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. Jackson was an original member of The Jackson 5 and The Jacksons, who rose to fame in the late 1960s and 1970s with the Motown label, and later recorded as a solo artist on the Epic label in the late 1970s and 1980s. Tito is the third child in the Jackson family.

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