Sherry Magee

Sherwood Robert "Sherry" Magee (August 6, 1884 – March 13, 1929) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. From 1904 through 1919, Magee played with the Philadelphia Phillies (1904–14), Boston Braves (1915–1917) and Cincinnati Reds (1917–1919). He batted and threw right-handed and in a 16-season career posted a .291 batting average with 83 home runs and 1,176 runs batted in through 2,087 games played.

Sherry Magee
Sherry Magee circa 1911
Left fielder
Born: August 6, 1884
Clarendon, Pennsylvania
Died: March 13, 1929 (aged 44)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 29, 1904, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 1919, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.291
Hits2,169
Home runs83
Runs batted in1,176
Stolen bases441
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

A native of Clarendon, Pennsylvania, Magee was one of the premier hitters of the dead-ball era. From 1905 through 1914, Magee finished in the National League Top 10 in home runs and RBIs seven times, including leading the NL in RBIs four times. He led the league for a fourth time in the 1918 campaign, which was shortened by World War I and the Spanish flu pandemic. Magee also hit over .300 five times, including a batting title to his credit as well, while also being known as one of the finest defensive outfielders of his day. He collected 2,169 hits and 441 stolen bases, including 23 steals of home.

Sherry magee
Magee's 1911 baseball card.

Magee was obtained by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1904 and remained with them for eleven years. His 85 RBIs in 1905 were an NL high. His most productive season came in 1910, when he led the league in batting (.310), RBIs (123), runs (110), total bases (263), on-base percentage (.445), slugging average (.507) and OPS (.952), and finished second in doubles (39) and triples (17).

On July 10, 1911, Magee struck umpire Bill Finneran as a result of disputing a called third strike, knocking him unconscious, at which he was suspended for the remainder of the season, although on appeal the suspension was shortened to just over a month, 36 games.[1]

In 1914 Magee led the league in hits (171), doubles (39), RBIs (103), extra base hits (65), total bases (277) and slugging (.509). A year later, he was traded to the Boston Braves. He remained at Boston until the 1917 midseason, when he was sent to the Cincinnati Reds. In 1918, he led the league in RBIs (76) for the fourth time. In 1919, Magee was seriously ill for two months and he concluded his major league career by pinch-hitting twice during the 1919 World Series.

Later life

Magee later played in the minors and also umpired in the New York–Penn League (1927) and the National League (1928). A victim of pneumonia, Magee died in Philadelphia, at age 44.

He is buried at Arlington Cemetery in Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania.

In 2008, he was one of ten pre-1943 players to be considered by the Cooperstown Veterans Committee for induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

See also

References

  1. ^ Amsterdam Evening Recorder, August 17, 1911 Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links

1904 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1904 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1905 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1905 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses.

1906 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1906 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 71 wins and 82 losses.

1907 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1907 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1908 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1908 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

1909 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1909 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1910 Major League Baseball season

The 1910 Major League Baseball season.

1910 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1910 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1912 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1912 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 73–79, 30½ games behind the first-place New York Giants.

1914 Major League Baseball season

The 1914 Major League Baseball season.

1914 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1914 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1915 Boston Braves season

The 1915 Boston Braves season was the 45th season of the franchise. The Braves finished second in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses, seven games behind the National League champion Philadelphia Phillies. The 1915 season was notable for the opening of Braves Field on August 13, the last of the National League's "jewel box" stadiums to be built. (Weeghman Park in Chicago, while opened in 1914, would not be occupied by the Cubs until the next season.) Prior to the opening of Braves Field, the Braves had played in Fenway Park for the first half of the 1915 season and the last 27 games of the 1914 season, having left their only previous home, South End Grounds, on August 11, 1914.

In the final game of the season, a 15–8 loss to the New York Giants, Joe Shannon made his final Major League appearance, and Red Shannon made his first Major League appearance. The two were twins, marking the first of three times that twins played on the same team (along with Eddie and Johnny O'Brien and Jose and Ozzie Canseco).

1916 Boston Braves season

The 1916 Boston Braves season was the 46th season of the franchise. was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 89–63, four games behind the Brooklyn Robins.

Before the 1916 season, the Braves were sold to a syndicate headed by former Harvard University football coach Percy Haughton.

1917 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1917 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 78–76, 20 games behind the New York Giants.

1918 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1918 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 68–60, 15½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1918 Major League Baseball season

The 1918 Major League Baseball season featured a reduced schedule due to American participation in World War I.

Bill Finneran

William Finneran (January 12, 1878 – July 3, 1961) was an American umpire in Major League Baseball in 1911 and 1912. He also umpired in the Federal League, a "third major league", in 1915 and spent several seasons in various levels of professional umpiring. He is best known for an on-field incident in which he was knocked unconscious by a punch from player Sherry Magee.

List of National League annual slugging percentage leaders

List of National League Slugging Percentage Leaders

The National League slugging percentage Leader is the Major League Baseball player in the National League who has the highest slugging percentage in a particular season.

In baseball statistics, slugging percentage' (abbreviated SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. It is calculated as total bases divided by at bats:

where AB is the number of at-bats for a given player, and 1B, 2B, 3B, and HR are the number of singles, doubles, triples, and home runs, respectively. Walks are specifically excluded from this calculation.

Currently, a player needs to accrue an average of at least 3.1 plate appearances for each game his team plays in order to qualify for the title. An exception to this qualification rule is that if a player falls short of 3.1 plate appearances per game, but would still have the highest batting average if enough hitless at-bats were added to reach the 3.1 average mark, the player still wins the slugging percentage championship.

The latest example of this exception being employed was in 2007, when Ryan Braun had a .634 slugging percentage, but only 492 plate appearances – 10 short of the 502 necessary. The addition of 10 hitless at-bats would have lowered his slugging percentage to a value that was still better than anyone else in the league, so Braun was the National League slugging percentage champion. A similar situation occurred when Tony Gwynn won the NL batting title in 1996.

Year-by-Year National League Slugging Percentage Leaders

+ Hall of Famer

A ** by the stat's value indicates the player had fewer than the required number of plate appearances for the SLG title that year. In order to rank the player, the necessary number of hitless at bats were added to the player's season total. The value here is their actual value, and not the value used to rank them.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

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