Sherman Lewis

Sherman Lewis (born June 29, 1942) is an American football coach and former player, most recently an offensive consultant and offensive play-caller for the Washington Redskins of the NFL.[1] He spent thirty-four years as a coach, but had been out of football since the end of the 2004 season before joining the Redskins mid-way into the 2009 season, where he replaced head coach Jim Zorn as the team's offensive play-caller after the sixth game of the season. He attended Michigan State University as an undergrad and later received his graduate degree from Michigan State in education administration.

Lewis began his football career at Michigan State as a halfback. He was named to the College Football All-America Team and finished third behind winner Roger Staubach and runner-up Billy Lothridge for the Heisman Trophy in 1963. His professional playing career included parts of the 1964 and 1965 seasons with the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League. He also played the 1966 and 1967 seasons with the New York Jets of the American Football League (when the AFL was absorbed by, but not yet merged with, the National Football League).

After a brief career as a professional football player, he was hired as an assistant coach for the football team at his alma mater, Michigan State, from 1969 through 1982. He went on to become the running backs coach for Bill Walsh, under whom the San Francisco 49ers won three Super Bowls. Subsequently, in 1992, he became the offensive coordinator for Green Bay Packers head coach Mike Holmgren.

On October 6, 2009, Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder announced that Lewis had come out of retirement to serve as an offensive consultant for the team under head coach Jim Zorn. On October 19, ESPN reported that Redskins General Manager, Vinny Cerrato, had taken away play calling duties from Zorn and given them to Lewis.[2][3] Zorn & Cerrato were both fired following the 2009 season. Lewis was not retained by the replacement coaching staff.

Sherman Lewis
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:June 29, 1942 (age 76)
Louisville, Kentucky
Career information
High school:duPont Manual (KY)
College:Michigan State
AFL draft:1964 / Round: 9 / Pick: 67
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ "Redskins SIgn Former Coach Sherman Lewis". Retrieved 2009-10-07.
  2. ^ Zorn won't call Redskins' plays
  3. ^ Glazer, Jay (October 19, 2009) "Zorn to give up Redskins playcalling duties" Archived 2009-10-22 at the Wayback Machine, FOX Sports. Retrieved on October 19, 2009.
1961 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1961 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1961 Big Ten Conference football season.

1961 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1961 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State University in the 1961 Big Ten Conference football season. In their eighth season under head coach Duffy Daugherty, the Spartans compiled a 7–2 overall record (5–2 against Big Ten opponents), finished in third place in the Big Ten Conference, and were ranked #8 in the final AP Poll.Two Spartans were selected as first-team players on the 1961 All-Big Ten Conference football team. Halfback George Saimes received first-team honors from the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI), and tackle Dave Behrman received first-team honors from the AP. Halfback Sherman Lewis received second-team all-conference honors from the AP. Dave Behrman also received first-team recognition from the AP and Football Writers Association of America on the 1961 College Football All-America Team.The 1961 Spartans won all three of their annual rivalry games. In the annual Indiana–Michigan State football rivalry game, the Spartans defeated the Hoosiers by a 35 to 0 score. In the Notre Dame rivalry game, the Spartans defeated the Fighting Irish by a 17 to 7 score. And, in the annual Michigan–Michigan State football rivalry game, the Spartans defeated the Wolverines by a 28 to 0 score. In non-conference play, the Spartans also defeated Stanford, 31-3.

1962 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1962 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1962 Big Ten Conference football season.

1962 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1962 Big Ten Conference football season was the 67th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1962 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1962 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Milt Bruhn, compiled an 8–2 record, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (32.2 points per game), and was ranked No. 2 in the final AP Poll. After losing only one game in the regular season, the Badgers lost to USC in the 1963 Rose Bowl. Quarterback Ron Vander Kelen led the Big Ten with 1,582 passing yards and 1,839 total yards and won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the conference's most valuable player. End Pat Richter led the conference with 694 receiving yards and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Murray Warmath, compiled a 6–2–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points allowed per game), finished in second place in the Big Ten, and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Tackle Bobby Bell was a consensus first-team All-American, won the Outland Trophy as college football's best interior lineman, and finished third in the voting for the 1962 Heisman Trophy.

The 1962 Northwestern Wildcats football team, under head coach Ara Parseghian, compiled a 7–2 record and finished in third place in the conference. The Wildcats were ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll before losing consecutive games late in the season. They remained ranked No. 16 in the final Coaches' Poll. Quarterback Tom Myers totaled 1,537 passing yards, and center Jack Cvercko was a consensus first-team All-American.

The conference's other statistical leaders included Michigan State fullback George Saimes with 642 rushing yards and Wisconsin's Lou Holland with 72 points scored.

1963 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1963 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1963 Big Ten Conference football season. The selectors for the 1963 season were the Associated Press (AP), based on a vote by media members, and the United Press International (UPI), based on a vote of the conference coaches. Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

Michigan State halfback Sherman Lewis was the only player to be unanimously selected by all ten of the conference coaches as a first-team honoree. Minnesota tackle Carl Eller and Illinois center Dick Butkus were selected as first-team players by nine of the ten conference coaches.

1963 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1963 Big Ten Conference football season was the 68th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1963 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Pete Elliott, won the Big Ten football championship with a record of 8–1–1, defeated Washington in the 1964 Rose Bowl, and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. Illinois center Dick Butkus received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football award as the most valuable player in the conference and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1963 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 6–2–1 record, finished in second place in the conference, led the conference in scoring defense (7.0 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Sherman Lewis was a consensus first-team All-American and finished third in the voting of the 1963 Heisman Trophy.

The Big Ten's statistical leaders included Tom Myers of Northwestern with 1,398 passing yards, Tom Nowatzke of Indiana with 756 rushing yards, and Paul Krause of Iowa with 442 receiving yards. Carl Eller of Minnesota was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1964 NFL Draft with the sixth overall pick.

1963 College Football All-America Team

The 1963 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1963. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1963 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Central Press Association (CP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (6) the Sporting News, and (7) the United Press International (UPI).

1963 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1963 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State University in the 1963 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 10th season under head coach Duffy Daugherty, the Spartans compiled a 6–2–1 overall record 4–1–1 against Big Ten opponents), finished in second place in the Big Ten Conference, and were ranked #9 in the final AP Poll.Two Spartans were selected as first-team players on the 1963 All-Big Ten Conference football team. Halfback Sherman Lewis received first-team honors from the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI), and end Dan Underwood received first-team honors from the AP. Lewis was also a consensus first-team All-American.

1986 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1986 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League. The team returned to the top of the NFC West after a one-year absence, and lost the Divisional Playoffs to the Giants.

Joe Montana suffered a back injury in Week 1 and was lost for two months after surgery. Because the injury was so severe, doctors forced him to retire. However, Montana did return for Week 10 against the then-St. Louis Cardinals. Montana shared Comeback Player of the Year honors with Minnesota's Tommy Kramer at the end of the season.

1999 Chicago Bears season

The 1999 Chicago Bears season was their 80th regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). On January 24, Dick Jauron was named head coach. The club posted a 6–10 record under Jauron, who replaced Dave Wannstedt.

Quarterbacks Shane Matthews (1,645), Cade McNown (1,465) and Jim Miller (1,242) combined for 4,352 passing yards during the season, the most in franchise history.

2017–18 Regional Four Day Competition

The 2017–18 Regional Four Day Competition was the 52nd edition of the Regional Four Day Competition, the domestic first-class cricket competition for the countries of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB). The competition ran from 26 October 2017 to 21 January 2018, with six matches being played as day/night fixtures.Six teams contested the tournament – Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, the Leeward Islands, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Windward Islands. Guyana were the defending champions and retained their title, finishing ahead of Barbados.In December 2017, the round 6 fixture between Guyana and the Windward Islands finished as a tie. This was the 63rd tied game in more than 300 years of first-class cricket, and the first occurrence of a tied match in first-class cricket in the West Indies.

Forty Thieves (film)

Forty Thieves is a 1944 American western starring William Boyd in the lead role of Hopalong Cassidy. It was directed by Lesley Selander, produced by Harry Sherman and released by United Artists.

India A cricket team and West Indies A cricket team in England in 2018

The India A cricket team and the West Indies A cricket team played a List-A Tri-series and first-class matches in England between June and July 2018. Prior to Tri Series India A and West Indies A played warm up matches against County Clubs. India A won the tri series.

Pro-style offense

A pro-style offense in American football is any offensive scheme that resembles those predominantly used at the professional level of play in the National Football League (NFL), in contrast to those typically used at the collegiate or high school level. Pro-style offenses are fairly common at top-quality colleges but much less used at the high school level. The term should not be confused with a pro set, which is a specific formation that is used by some offenses at the professional level.

Generally, pro-style offenses are more complex than typical college or high school offenses. They are balanced, requiring offensive lines that are adept at both pass and run blocking, quarterbacks (QBs) with good decision-making abilities, and running backs (RBs) who are capable of running between the tackles. Offenses that fall under the pro-style category include the West Coast offense, the Air Coryell offense, and the Erhardt-Perkins offensive system.

Often, pro style offenses use certain formations much more commonly than the air raid, run and shoot, flexbone, spread, pistol, or option offenses. Pro-style offenses typically use the fullback (FB) and TEs much more commonly than offenses used at the collegiate or high school levels.

Part of the complexity of the offense is that teams at the professional level often employ multiple formations and are willing to use them at any point during an actual game. One example might be that a team uses a Strong I formation run (FB lined up where the TE is located on the line of scrimmage) on 1st Down followed up by a running play out of the Ace formation on second down before attempting a pass on 3rd down out of a two-WR shotgun formation.

Another aspect of the complexity is that the running game is primarily built on zone blocking or involves a power run scheme. Both of these require an offensive of line that is very athletic, one play they could be trying to zone block a Linebacker, and the following one could be power blocking a defensive line. Most of the blocking schemes involve a series of rules, or a system in which they operate their blocks. The passing game as a result often employs play-action, often with the QB dropping back from under center, as a means of passing the ball while building on the running game.

Coaches who make the transition from the NFL to the NCAA as head coaches often bring with them their pro-style offenses. Such examples include Charlie Weis (former HC at Kansas), Dave Wannstedt (former HC at Pittsburgh), Bill O'Brien (former HC at Penn State). One positive aspect of employing a pro-style offense is that it can help players make transitions from the college level to the professional level quicker as a result of their familiarity with the system's complexity.

Sherman L. Lowe

Sherman L. Lowe (born Salt Lake City, Utah (or Russia), 18 October 1894; died 24 Jan 1968, age 73, Los Angeles) was a writer of the Frank Buck serial Jungle Menace.

Sherman Lewis (cricketer)

Sherman Lewis (born 21 October 1995) is a West Indian cricketer. He made his first-class debut for the Windward Islands in the 2016–17 Regional Four Day Competition on 10 March 2017. In November 2017, he took his maiden five-wicket haul in first-class cricket, bowling for the Windward Islands against Trinidad and Tobago in the 2017–18 Regional Four Day Competition. He made his List A debut for the West Indies A against the England Lions in a tri-series on 28 June 2018.In September 2018, he was added to the West Indies' Test squad for the series against India. He made his Test debut against India on 4 October 2018.

West Coast offense

In American football, the West Coast offense is an offense that places a greater emphasis on passing than on running.

There are two similar but distinct offensive strategic systems that are commonly referred to as "West Coast offenses". Originally, the term referred to the Air Coryell system popularized by Don Coryell. Following a journalistic error, however, it now more commonly refers to the offensive system devised by Bill Walsh while he was the offensive coordinator of the Cincinnati Bengals, characterized by short, horizontal passing routes in lieu of running plays to "stretch out" defenses, opening up the potential for long runs or long passes. It was popularized when Walsh was the head coach of the San Francisco 49ers.

West Indian cricket team in India in 2018–19

The West Indies cricket team toured India from September to November 2018 to play two Tests, five One Day Internationals (ODIs) and three Twenty20 International (T20I) matches. Ahead of the Test series, there was a two-day practice match in Vadodara.Jason Holder was ruled out of the first Test due to an injury, with Kraigg Brathwaite captaining the West Indies in his place. India won the match, their 100th win in Tests at home. India went on to win the second Test by 10 wickets, winning the series 2–0. It was India's tenth consecutive series win at home in Tests.The second ODI was the 950th ODI to be played by India, becoming first team to achieve the milestone. During the match, India's captain Virat Kohli became the fastest batsman to score 10,000 runs in ODIs, taking 205 innings, beating the previous record of 259 innings set by Sachin Tendulkar. India went on to win the five-match ODI series 3–1, after the second ODI ended in a tie.India's regular wicket-keeper for limited overs matches, MS Dhoni, was not named in the side's squad for the T20I fixtures for this series and the ones against Australia. Instead, India's Test wicket-keeper, Rishabh Pant, was selected in Dhoni's place. Rohit Sharma was also named as India's captain for the T20I matches against the West Indies, with Virat Kohli being rested. India won the T20I series 3–0.

Whoopee cap

A whoopee cap is a style of headwear popular among youths in the mid 20th century in the United States. It was made from the crown (the topmost part of a hat) of a felt hat with the brim removed, the crown trimmed with a zigzag cut and the crown folded half-way up. It is worn with Pin-back buttons. and referred to as a Jughead hat, palookaville cap, clubhouse hat, or Kingpin.

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