Shelburne County, Nova Scotia

Shelburne County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.

Shelburne County
Location of Shelburne County, Nova Scotia
Location of Shelburne County, Nova Scotia
Coordinates: 43°48′N 65°18′W / 43.8°N 65.3°WCoordinates: 43°48′N 65°18′W / 43.8°N 65.3°W
Country Canada
Province Nova Scotia
District
municipalities
Barrington / Shelburne
TownsShelburne / Lockeport / Clark's Harbour
Established1784
Electoral Districts
Federal

South Shore—St. Margarets
ProvincialQueens-Shelburne
Area
 • Total2,467.39 km2 (952.66 sq mi)
Population
(2016)[1]
 • Total13,966
 • Density5.7/km2 (15/sq mi)
 • Change 2011-16
Decrease3.7%
Time zoneUTC-4 (AST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-3 (ADT)
Area code(s)902
Dwellings7765
Median Income*$40,514 CDN
  • Median household income, 2005 (all households)

History

Shelburne County was founded in 1784 shortly following the influx of Loyalist settlers evacuated from the newly independent United States of America. It was originally named Port Roseway, until it became a very busy town and was considered to be the capital of Nova Scotia, in which the name was changed to Shelburne in an attempt to please Lord Shelburne, the British Prime Minister from 1782 to 1783. The boundaries of Shelburne County were established by Governor and Council on December 16, 1785.

The first Loyalists arrived in May 1783. They were faced with a somewhat bleak environment in which to make their homes. The land is very rocky with acidic soil. There is also a lot of forest.

The area had previously been settled by French-speaking Catholic Acadians, many of whom had been deported to British Colonies. The new arrivals included Black Loyalists who were given substandard land, particularly around Birchtown. In 1796 about 600 Jamaican Maroons were deported to this area of Nova Scotia as well.

In 1824, at a time when the lines of a number of counties were being cut out and marked, the boundary between Queens and Shelburne Counties was surveyed.

In 1836 Shelburne County was divided into two separate and distinct counties with Yarmouth County being formed out of what had been part of Shelburne County.

In 1854, Shelburne County was divided into two districts for court sessional purposes - Shelburne and Barrington. In 1879, these districts were incorporated as district municipalities.

Demographics

As a census division in the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Shelburne County recorded a population of 13,966 living in 6,378 of its 7,765 total private dwellings, a change of −3.7% from its 2011 population of 14,496. With a land area of 2,467.39 km2 (952.66 sq mi), it had a population density of 5.7/km2 (14.7/sq mi) in 2016.[2]

Population trend[3][4]

Census Population Change (%)
2016 13,966 Decrease3.7%
2011 14,496 Decrease6.7%
2006 15,544 Decrease4.2%
2001 16,231 Decrease4.5%
1996 17,002 Decrease2.0%
1991 17,343 Decrease1.0%
1986 17,516 Increase1.1%
1981 17,328 N/A
1941 13,251
1931 12,485
1921 13,491
1911 14,105
1901 14,202
1891 14,956
1881 14,913
1871 12,417 N/A

Mother tongue language (2011)[5]

Language Population Pct (%)
English only 14,050 97.91%
French only 155 1.08%
Non-official languages 110 0.77%
Multiple responses 30 0.21%

Ethnic Groups (2006)[6]

Ethnic Origin Population Pct (%)
Canadian 9,335 60.6%
English 5,145 33.4%
Scottish 3,115 20.2%
Irish 1,915 12.4%
German 1,805 11.7%
French 1,235 8.0%
Métis 970 6.3%
Dutch (Netherlands) 680 4.4%
North American Indian 630 4.1%

Communities

Towns
District municipalities

Access routes

Highways and numbered routes that run through the county, including external routes that start or finish at the county boundary:[7]

  • External Routes:
    • None

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b 2006 Statistics Canada Community Profile: Shelburne County, Nova Scotia
  2. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census divisions, 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Nova Scotia)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 12, 2017.
  3. ^ Censuses 1871-1941
  4. ^ Statistics Canada: 1996, 2001, 2006 census
  5. ^ Statistics Canada: 2011 census
  6. ^ 2006 Statistics Canada Census Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada: Shelburne County, Nova Scotia
  7. ^ Atlantic Canada Back Road Atlas ISBN 978-1-55368-618-7 Page 89

External links

Centreville, Shelburne, Nova Scotia

Centreville is a community on Cape Sable Island in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in the Barrington municipal district of Shelburne County.

Clyde River, Nova Scotia

Clyde River is a community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in the Shelburne municipal district of Shelburne County. It shares its name with the Clyde River which flows through the community.

Fort St. Louis (Shelburne County, Nova Scotia)

Not to be confused with Fort St. Louis (Guysborough County, Nova Scotia)

Fort Saint Louis was a fort built by the French Empire in 1623 in its colony of Acadia. During the Scottish occupation of Port Royal from 1629 to 1632, this fort was France's only foothold in Acadia. The British were unsuccessful in their attempts to capture the fort, and France regained Acadia in 1632. The archaeological remains of the former fort are located in what is today Nova Scotia, Canada.

The site of Fort St Louis was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1931. The Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada placed a cairn and plaque commemorating the fort at a site in Port La Tour, Nova Scotia, although some argue that the fort was actually located in nearby Villagedale, Nova Scotia.

Ingomar, Nova Scotia

Ingomar is a community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in the Shelburne municipal district of Shelburne County.

Lighthouse Route

The Lighthouse Route is a scenic roadway in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. It follows the province's South Shore for 339 km (211 mi) from Halifax to Yarmouth.

List of communities in Shelburne County, Nova Scotia

List of communities in Shelburne County, Nova Scotia

Communities are ordered by the highway upon which they are located. All routes start with the terminus located near the largest community.

List of historic places in Shelburne County, Nova Scotia

This is a list of historic places in Shelburne County, Nova Scotia.

Lockeport

Lockeport is a town and port in Shelburne County, Nova Scotia, Canada. It is a traditional Nova Scotian fishing town, situated on a peninsula in Allendale Bay. It is connected to the mainland by the Crescent Beach causeway. The area that surrounds the bay is known as the "Ragged Islands."

Municipality of the District of Barrington

Barrington, officially named the Municipality of the District of Barrington, is a district municipality in western Shelburne County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Statistics Canada classifies the district municipality as a municipal district.

Municipality of the District of Shelburne

Shelburne, officially named the Municipality of the District of Shelburne, is a district municipality comprising the eastern section of Shelburne County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Statistics Canada classifies the district municipality as a municipal district.

Nova Scotia Route 203

Route 203 is a collector road in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.

It is located in Shelburne and Yarmouth Counties and runs through a sparsely populated area including Argyle Municipality from Shelburne at Trunk 3 along the border of the Tobeatic Wilderness Area through Kemptville and connects to Nova Scotia Route 340 at Carleton. The village of East Kemptville is the only part of a municipality in Nova Scotia disconnected from the rest of the district by roads, and accessible only from other districts via Highway 203.

Route 203 is considered the loneliest road in the province because it has the longest uninhabited stretch of any paved highway in Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia Route 309

Route 309 is a collector road in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.

It is located in Shelburne County and connects Barrington at Trunk 3/Highway 103 with Clyde River at Trunk 3/Highway 103.

Nova Scotia Route 330

Route 330 is a collector road in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.

It is located in Shelburne County and connects Barrington Passage at Trunk 3 with Clark's Harbour.

It crosses the Barrington Passage to Cape Sable Island on a causeway that opened in 1949, replacing a ferry service.

Nova Scotia Trunk 3

Nova Scotia Trunk 3 is an east-west trunk highway in Nova Scotia. The route runs from Halifax to Yarmouth, along the South Shore. Trunk 3's status as an important regional highway link has been superseded by the parallel Highway 103.

Roseway, Nova Scotia

Roseway is a community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in the Shelburne municipal district of Shelburne County.

Sable River, Nova Scotia

Sable River is a rural community of the Municipality of the District of Shelburne in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.

Tobeatic Game Reserve

The Tobeatic Wilderness Area is the largest protected area in the Canadian Maritimes. Nova Scotia, Canada. It is in the south western central part of the province, near Kejimkujik National Park. It has been formerly known as the Tobeatic Wildlife Management Area, and the Tobeatic Game Reserve.

Tobeatic means Place of the Alder in the Mi'kmaq language.It contains large areas of Acadian forest. The geography is varied, consisting of wetlands, woodlands, scrublands and barrens. The landscape was shaped by the last glaciation, which left glacial barrens, erratics, drumlins, eskers, moraines, hummocks, outwash plains and kettle lakes.

The Tobeatic differs from nearby Kejimkujik National Park in that some hunting and public leasing of land is allowed, and that campsites, canoe routes, and portages are not as developed or maintained. However, the Nova Scotia Department of Environment and Labour, Protected Areas Division, is in the process of opening some trails systems and retiring hunting camps. All Terrain Vehicle use within the Reserve has also been disallowed. Along with Kejimkujik, the Tobeatic is part of the UNESCO designated Southwest Nova Biosphere Reserve.The Tobeatic Wilderness Area is made up of several geological units including: the Goldenville Formation, the Halifax Formation, and Middle to Late Devonian biotite monzogranite and leucomonzogranite.

Wildlife in the Tobeatic Game Reserve includes eastern moose and white-tailed deer.The area is the setting for the book The Tent Dwellers.

The region has many lakes and rivers including: the Shelburne, Clyde, and Tusket rivers.

Archaeological research shows that the Mi’kmaq people were present in the Tobeatic at least 4500 years ago.

Upper Port La Tour, Nova Scotia

Upper Port La Tour is a community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in the Barrington Municipal District of Shelburne County.

Woods Harbour, Nova Scotia

Woods Harbour is a community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in the Barrington municipal district of Shelburne County. People from the Woods Harbour area are locally known as "Cockawitters" (or with local slang applying; "Cockawittas"). Cockerwit Passage is a body of water that leads to the mouth of Woods Harbour from the west.

Places adjacent to Shelburne County, Nova Scotia
Historical counties
Economic regions
Regional municipalities
County municipalities
District municipalities
Towns
Villages
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