Sheffield City Council

Sheffield City Council is the city council for the metropolitan borough of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. It consists of 84 councillors, elected to represent 28 wards, each with three councillors. It is currently under Labour control and led by Julie Dore.

Sheffield City Council
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
Leadership
Cllr Tony Downing, Labour
since 15 May 2019
Leader of the Council
Chief executive
John Mothersole
since 3 July 2008
Structure
Seats84 councillors
SheffieldCityCouncil2019
Political groups
Government
     Labour (49)
Opposition
     Liberal Democrats (26)
     Green (8)
     UKIP (1)
Joint committees
Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield Combined Authority
Elections
First past the post
Last election
2 May 2019
Next election
7 May 2020
Meeting place
Sheffield Town Hall
Sheffield Town Hall
Website
www.sheffield.gov.uk

History

The council was founded as the Corporation of Sheffield in 1843, when Sheffield was incorporated (see History of Sheffield). In 1889, it attained county borough status and in 1893 city status. In 1974, the Local Government Act 1972, reconstituted the City Council as a metropolitan district council of South Yorkshire, governed also by South Yorkshire County Council. It established a system of 90 councillors, three to each of 30 wards. This was reduced in 1980 with the merger of the Attercliffe and Darnall wards to 87 councillors in 29 wards.

In 1986, the abolition of metropolitan county councils saw Sheffield City Council effectively regain its county borough status.

In 2004, the local wards were completely reorganised, producing 28 new wards and 84 councillors.

In April 2014, the Sheffield City Council voted to recognize the right to self-determination of Somaliland, an autonomous region in northwestern Somalia, the first city council to do so. The gesture is purely ceremonial and carries no legal weight.[1] The UK government and the international community officially recognise Somaliland as a part of Somalia.

Political control

For twenty years from 1846, Isaac Ironside's Central Democratic Association was a force on the council. It then returned to typical ConservativeLiberal rivalry.

The Labour Party made little impact in its early years; by 1918, there were only three Labour councillors (and two Liberal-Labour, plus one Lib-Lab alderman). That all changed in 1919, when Labour won almost all the seats up for election that year, giving them 12 councillors and their coalition partners the Co-operative Party two. In response to their losses, the Conservative and Liberal groups merged to form the Citizens Association, retaining control with 32 councillors and 15 aldermen. The Lib-Labs remained unchanged in numbers and politically between the two groups.[2]

In the following years, Labour continued to advance at the expense of the Citizens Association. By 1922, there were 18 Labour councillors and one alderman; by 1925, 22 councillors and one alderman. At the 1926 elections, Labour rose to 29 councillors. A majority on the council and a large number of retiring aldermen finally enabled them to take 8 positions on the aldermanic bench.[2]

The seats were redistributed into 24 wards in 1930, and the Citizens Association renamed itself the Progressive Party. A further seat was added for Norton in 1934, taking the total number of positions to 75 councillors and 25 aldermen. That year, Labour briefly lost control, but regained it in 1934, with an increased majority of 12. This rose to 14 the following year. In 1945, Labour had 59 total seats to the Progressive's 39, one independent and one Communist. Labour continued to build its majority, to 34 in 1952 and 42 by 1958.[2] However, it lost control to the Conservative Party, again standing on its own, in 1968-9.

The Council was reorganised under the Local Government Act 1972 and in 1974, Aldermen were abolished, with elections to Sheffield City Council moving to 'thirds', and elections three years of every four, with terms lasting four years.

Despite these changes the council remained under Labour control until 1999, when the Liberal Democrats took control of the council. The Labour Party regained control of the Council in 2002 with power shifting back to the Liberal Democrats in 2008. However, Labour took control once again in 2011.

During this period there were three years of No Overall Control; from 2002-03 (Labour Minority), 2007-08 (Labour Minority) and 2010-11 (Liberal Democrat Minority).

Leaders

A list of leaders of Sheffield City Council from 1901.[3]

  • 1901: William Clegg (Liberal)
  • 1903: Herbert Hughes (Conservative)
  • 1905: William Clegg (Liberal)
  • 1907: Herbert Hughes (Conservative)
  • 1911: William Clegg (Liberal, Citizens from 1920)
  • 1926: Ernest Rowlinson (Labour)
  • 1932: Arthur Blanchard (Municipal Progressive)
  • 1933: Ernest Rowlinson (Labour)
  • 1941: William Asbury (Labour)
  • 1942: Frank Thraves (Labour)
  • 1946: J. H. Bingham (Labour)
  • 19??: Grace Tebbutt (Labour)
  • 1966: Ron Ironmonger (Labour)
  • 1968: Harold Hebblethwaite (Conservative)
  • 1969: Ron Ironmonger (Labour)

Leaders and control since 1974

Name Years Control
George Wilson 1974 – 1980 Labour
David Blunkett 1980 – 1987
Clive Betts 1987 – 1992
Mike Bower 1992 – 1998
Jan Wilson 1998 – 1999
Peter Moore 1999 – 2002 Liberal Democrats
Jan Wilson 2002 – 2003 No Overall Control
2003 – 2007 Labour
2007 – 2008 No Overall Control
Paul Scriven 2008 – 2010 Liberal Democrats
2010 – 2011 No Overall Control
Julie Dore 2011 – present Labour

Council as service provider and employer

Sheffield City Council provides approximately 550 services to its citizens. It is also a major employer in the city, with more than 18,000 employees, including all state school staff in its role as Local Education Authority (LEA).

Services and employees are organised into four portfolios:[4]

  • Resources Portfolio - responsible for corporate resources and organisational development.
  • Children, Young People and Families's Portfolio - equivalent to an LEA and responsible for early years, primary, secondary and special schools, children and families' social care, looked-after children and youth offending.
  • Place Portfolio - responsible for planning, housing, environmental regulation, parks and countryside, street maintenance and cleanliness, and cultural activities.
  • Communities Portfolio - responsible for libraries, local governance, community safety and adult social services, including physical disability, learning disability and older people.

Other functions are performed by partners and contractors of the council:[5]

  • Amey manage the city's 'Streets Ahead' project including management of highways.
  • Kier Sheffield maintains and repairs the social housing stock.
  • Veolia manages household waste disposal.
  • Capita provides HR, payroll and IT services for council employees.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Somaliland Hails British Step Forward in Independence Bid". VOA. 5 April 2014. Retrieved 23 April 2014.
  2. ^ a b c J. Mendelson, W. Owen, S. Pollard and V. M. Thornes, The Sheffield Trades and Labour Council 1858 - 1958
  3. ^ Clyde Binfield et al., The History of the City of Sheffield 1843-1993. Volume I: Politics
  4. ^ "Management Team". Sheffield City Council. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013.
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 November 2013. Retrieved 29 November 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

1978 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on 4 May 1978. One third of the council was up for election.

1982 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on 6 May 1982. One third of the council was up for election.

1986 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on 8 May 1986. One third of the council was up for election. Since the 1984 election, the Conservatives had successfully defended two seats in Broomhill and Labour had held one of their Park seats in by-elections the following year.

1998 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on 7 May 1998. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party kept overall control of the council.

1999 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on 6 May 1999. One third of the council was up for election. Previous to this election, there had been a by-election in Park, resulting in a Liberal Democrat gain from Labour, effectively cancelling out the concurrent defection of sitting Stocksbridge councillor Alan Pears from the Lib Dems to Labour. The election seen the Liberal Democrats gain control of the council - the first time since its formation not to be controlled by Labour. The results themselves were more favourable to Labour than recent elections. However, they suffered double-digit losses with the Liberal Democrats sustaining their recent election surges.

2000 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on 4 May 2000. One third of the council was up for election. Previous to this election, two Liberal Democrats – Robert Watson and Trefor Morgan – became Independents. Similarly there were two Labour defections, long-time Labour councillor Dorothy Walton went to the Liberal Democrats and Michael Smith became an Independent.

The election saw the Liberal Democrats extend their majority through a couple of gains from Labour, with both parties recouping seats where aforementioned defections had taken place. Vote wise, the Liberal Democrat vote notably fell back from their previous elections' consistent increases, whereas the Conservatives managed their best vote share since 1992. Overall turnout was 25.8%.

2002 Sheffield City Council election

Sheffield City Council elections took place on 2 May 2002. One third of seats were up for election. Since the previous election, the Liberal Democrats and Labour had each suffered one defection - Ronald Shepherd left the Labour grouping to sit as an Independent and Lib Dem Matthew Dixon defected, firstly as an Independent and then to the Conservatives. In this time an earlier Lib Dem defector, Trefor Morgan, also changed from an Independent to Liberal.

Following this election, the council returned to no overall control, as the sizable swing from Lib Dem to Labour allowed Labour to gain five seats directly from the Lib Dems, and two from earlier defections, making Labour narrowly the largest party with 43 seats to the Lib Dem's 42. Overall turnout was 30.0%.

2003 Sheffield City Council election

The 2003 Sheffield Council election took place on 1 May 2003 to elect members of Sheffield City Council. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour took control of the council from no overall control with six gains from the Liberal Democrats.The election saw a trial of electronic voting in half of the council's wards. Voters in these wards were able to vote by either text message, touch tone phone, internet, post, or use electronic kiosks as well as the normal polling stations. Overall turnout was 29.5%, a half a percent fall on the previous year, a drop negated somewhat by the higher turnout in the wards trialing electronic voting.

2004 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on 10 June 2004. The whole council was up for election with boundary changes having taken place since the last election in 2003, reducing the number of seats by 3. This election was the first all-postal vote election held, dramatically improving overall turnout by 14.4% on the previous election to 43.9%. The Labour Party kept its overall majority and continued to run the council, albeit on a much slimmer majority. Previous to the boundary changes, sitting Hillsborough councillor Peter MacLoughlin defected from the Liberal Democrats to an Independent, choosing not to contest this election.

2006 Sheffield City Council election

Sheffield City Council elections took place on Thursday 4 May 2006 with polling stations open between 7am and 10pm. One third of council seats were up for election; one in each ward, plus one additional seat in Ecclesall due to a resignation. The overall turnout this year was 34.5%, down considerably from the previous year's general election turnout at 43.9 per cent turnout in Sheffield.

2007 Sheffield City Council election

Sheffield City Council elections took place on Thursday 3 May 2007 with one third of council seats up for election; one in each ward. Since the previous election, Liberal Democrat Martin Davis (representing Stocksbridge & Upper Don) defected, sitting as an independent. This set of elections saw the Conservatives lose the only seat they had on the council since 1996, and the party have not had any councillors elected to Sheffield City Council in any elections since.

The election seen several gains for the Liberal Democrats, returning the council to no overall control. Overall turnout was 36.0%, up slightly from last year's 34.5%.

2008 Sheffield City Council election

Sheffield City Council elections took place on Thursday 1 May 2008. There were 30 seats up for election - one of the three councillors from each ward, plus two seats from Labour councillors who had stepped down. Liberal Democrats made several gains, regaining control of the council for the first time since losing it in 2002. The overall turnout for this election was 36.8%.

2010 Sheffield City Council election

Sheffield City Council elections took place on Thursday 6 May 2010. There were 28 seats up for election in 2010, one of the three councillors from each ward. Since the previous election, Liberal Democrat councillor Frank Taylor had defected to an Independent leaving the Liberal Democrats with 44 councillors. Turnout was up dramatically with it being held alongside the general election, to 62.6%. The higher turnout helped mainly Labour against their electoral rivals, who managed to return the council to no overall control with three gains. This was bolstered by the newly elected Liberal Democrat in Walkley defecting to Labour immediately after being elected.

2011 Sheffield City Council election

Sheffield City Council elections took place on 5 May 2011. There were 28 seats up for election, one third of the council. The last election left the council with no overall control. Since the previous election, Liberal Democrat councillor Ben Curran, and Lib Dem-turned-independent Frank Taylor had defected to Labour leaving both parties equal at 41 councillors each. This election saw Labour regain control of the council that they lost in 2006, with nine gains from the Lib Dems. Overall turnout was 41.8%.Councillors elected in 2007 Sheffield Council election defended their seats this year.

2015 Sheffield City Council election

Sheffield City Council elections took place on Thursday 7 May 2015, the same day as the UK general election and local Parish Council elections. There were 28 seats up for election, one of the three councillors from each ward.

2018 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council took place on Thursday 3 May; one of a number of local council elections taking place across England on the same day. These were the first elections since 2016; the normal practice of electing one-third of councillors every year resumed this year, after the previous staging had seen all seats up for election as a result of boundary changes. A number of by-elections had also occurred between the 2016 and 2018 elections.

2019 Sheffield City Council election

Elections to Sheffield City Council were held on Thursday 2 May 2019; one of a number of local council elections taking place across England on the same day. One of each ward's three seats was up for election, having last been contested in the 2016 elections.

Local authorities in South Yorkshire
Joint arrangements
Metropolitan district councils
Districts
Councils
Local elections
South Yorkshire Council elections in South Yorkshire
Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council
Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council
Sheffield City Council
South Yorkshire County Council
West Riding County Council
Sheffield City Region

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.