Shawn Respert

Shawn Christopher Respert (born February 6, 1972) is an American retired professional basketball player who used to be an assistant coach with the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association (NBA). A 6'3" shooting guard born in Detroit, Michigan, he attended Bishop Borgess High School, and he came to prominence while playing college basketball at Michigan State University where his jersey is now retired. He played professionally in the NBA for four seasons from 1995 to 1999.

Shawn Respert
Chicago Bulls
PositionPlayer Development
LeagueNBA
Personal information
BornFebruary 6, 1972 (age 47)
Detroit, Michigan
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)[a]
Listed weight195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High schoolBishop Borgess (Detroit, Michigan)
CollegeMichigan State (1990–1995)
NBA draft1995 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8th overall
Selected by the Portland Trail Blazers
Playing career1995–2003
PositionPoint guard
Number3, 31, 21, 2
Coaching career2011–present
Career history
As player:
19951997Milwaukee Bucks
19971998Toronto Raptors
1998Dallas Mavericks
1999Phoenix Suns
1999–2000Adecco Milano
2000–2001Near East
2001–2002Fillattice Imola
2002–2003Spójnia Stargard Szczeciński
As coach:
2011–2012Minnesota Timberwolves (assistant)
20142016Memphis Grizzlies (assistant)
2018–presentChicago Bulls (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points851 (4.9 ppg)
Rebounds226 (1.3 rpg)
Assists177 (1.0 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

College career

Respert was a standout at Michigan State. He and point guard Eric Snow combined to form one of the nation's most prolific backcourt tandems for head coach Jud Heathcote's Spartans. Respert was the team's leading scorer all four seasons at Michigan State and finished his career second all-time in scoring among Big Ten players with 2,531 points (trailing only Calbert Chaney) and first in Big Ten games with 1,545 points scored. He capped a brilliant career by being named a unanimous first team All-American and Big Ten Player of the Year with a 25.6 scoring average during his 1994–95 senior season. He left East Lansing as the Spartans all-time leading scorer and began the tradition of out-going seniors kissing the logo at center court during their final home game.

NBA

Respert was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1st round, with the 8th overall pick, of the 1995 NBA Draft. The Blazers traded his NBA rights to the Milwaukee Bucks for the rights to Gary Trent and a first-round pick. Respert was traded to Toronto in his second year, where he scored 5.6 points a game. He next played briefly in Dallas the next season and then had a second stint with the Raptors. Respert finished his career in Phoenix during the 1998–99 season. He was under contract with Los Angeles Lakers for a brief period in October 2000 but was waived before playing in any NBA games for them. In his NBA career, Respert played in 172 games and scored a total of 851 points on averages of 4.9 points in 13.7 minutes per game.

He played professionally in Italy for Adecco Milano (1999–2000) and Fillattice Imola (2001–2002). He also played in Poland for Spójnia Stargard Szczeciński (2002–2003).

Respert had stomach cancer but did not admit it until 2005. He started being bothered with stomach cramps towards the end of his rookie season. He noticed a lump below his belly button even after changing his diet. Respert was diagnosed with cancer after undergoing a series of tests at Milwaukee's St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in May 1996. After confirmation through a second opinion, he underwent daily radiation therapy for three consecutive months, losing twenty pounds in the process. The only people who knew about this treatment were the Bucks' trainers, doctors, his coach Mike Dunleavy, Sr. and Michigan State backcourt partner Eric Snow. He only told a select few; not even his family and girlfriend knew, because "people don't want to hear excuses in pro sports, even if the excuse is cancer."[1]

Coaching

Respert became a volunteer coach at Prairie View A&M in Texas in 2004. Then in early 2005, he was hired to be Director of Basketball Operations at Rice University for 2​12 years. Next, Respert spent two years as the Director of Player Development of the NBA's minor league, the NBA Development League. In September 2008, he was hired by the Houston Rockets as the Director of Player Programs. On December 6, 2011 he was hired by the Minnesota Timberwolves as a player development coach.[2] He was named an assistant coach by the Memphis Grizzlies in September 2013.[3]

Notes

  • a Respert's listed height has ranged from 6'1" to 6'3".

References

  1. ^ "Shawn Respert's NBA career was stunted by cancer". ESPN. Associated Press. January 8, 2005. Retrieved June 5, 2013.
  2. ^ "Wolves Announce Basketball and Coaching Staffs". Minnesota Timberwolves. 6 December 2011.
  3. ^ Grizzlies announce coaching staff

External links

1991–92 Michigan State Spartans men's basketball team

The 1991–92 Michigan State Spartans men's basketball team represented Michigan State University in the 1991–92 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team played their home games at Breslin Center in East Lansing, Michigan and were members of the Big Ten Conference. They were coached by Jud Heathcote in his 16th year at Michigan State. The Spartans finished the season with a record of 22–8, 11–7 to finish in third place in Big Ten play. They received an at-large bid as a No. 5 seed to the NCAA Tournament, the school's third consecutive trip to the Tournament. There they beat Southwest Missouri State before losing to Cincinnati in the Second Round in a rematch of an earlier Spartan win.

1993–94 Michigan State Spartans men's basketball team

The 1993–94 Michigan State Spartans men's basketball team represented Michigan State University in the 1993–94 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team played their home games at Breslin Center in East Lansing, Michigan and were members of the Big Ten Conference. They were coached by Jud Heathcote in his 18th year at Michigan State. The Spartans finished the season with a record of 20–12, 10–8 to finish in fourth place in Big Ten play. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as a No. 7 seed where they beat Seton Hall in the First Round before losing to second-seeded Duke in the Second Round.

1994 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The Consensus 1994 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1994–95 Michigan State Spartans men's basketball team

The 1994–95 Michigan State Spartans men's basketball team represented Michigan State University in the 1994–95 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team played their home games at Breslin Center in East Lansing, Michigan and were members of the Big Ten Conference. They were coached by Jud Heathcote in his 19th and final season at Michigan State. The Spartans finished the season with a record of 22–6, 14–4 to finish in second place in Big Ten play, one game behind Purdue. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as a No. 3 seed where they surprised by 14th-seeded Weber State in the First Round 79–72. The game marked the final game of All-American Shawn Respert's career at MSU as well as the final game of head coach Jud Heathcote after 19 years with the Spartans. Long time assistant coach Tom Izzo would take over the following year.

1994–95 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

The 1994–95 NCAA Division I men's basketball season concluded in the 64-team 1995 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament whose finals were held at the Kingdome in Seattle, Washington. The UCLA Bruins earned their eleventh national championship by defeating the Arkansas Razorbacks 89–78 on April 3, 1995. They were coached by Jim Harrick and the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player was UCLA's Ed O'Bannon.

In the 32-team 1995 National Invitation Tournament, the Virginia Tech Hokies defeated the Marquette Warriors at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Following the season, the 1995 NCAA Men's Basketball All-American Consensus First team included Ed O'Bannon, Shawn Respert, Joe Smith, Jerry Stackhouse, and Damon Stoudamire.

1995 NBA draft

The 1995 NBA draft took place on June 28, 1995, at SkyDome in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It marked the first NBA draft to be held outside the United States and was the first draft for the two Canadian expansion teams, Toronto Raptors and Vancouver Grizzlies. Kevin Garnett, who was taken fifth in this draft, is notable for being the first player in two decades to be selected straight out of high school. Garnett would go on to gather fifteen All Star selections, eight All-NBA selections (four of those being First-Teams), one NBA MVP award, and multiple other accolades. Rasheed Wallace and Jerry Stackhouse also had

successful careers, being four-time and two-time All-Stars respectively. Wallace won an NBA championship in 2004 with the Detroit Pistons, while Stackhouse scored the most total points in the league in 2000, also with the Pistons.

The other remaining top selections had relatively productive careers, but were considered to have never reached their full potential. Joe Smith put up solid, but unspectacular numbers throughout his career and is generally considered a disappointment for a first overall selection. He was also involved in a salary cap scandal with the Minnesota Timberwolves. Antonio McDyess was a one-time All-Star, but serious and continuing knee injuries decreased much of his effectiveness in the prime of his career. Damon Stoudamire was the 1995–96 NBA Rookie of the Year and had a solid career although he was arrested, suspended and fined several times for marijuana possession. Bryant Reeves impressed early in his career but a season after being granted a six-year, $61.8 million contract extension, his numbers went down due to weight and back problems and he retired after only playing six NBA seasons, all with the Vancouver Grizzlies.This draft was also notable for two of the biggest busts in NBA history, Ed O'Bannon and Shawn Respert. O'Bannon had received national accolades for leading the UCLA Bruins to the NCAA Championship, but only played two years in the NBA. Respert played only four seasons in the NBA, while secretly hiding that he was suffering from stomach cancer.

1995 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The Consensus 1995 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1995–96 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Bucks' 28th season in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Bucks re-signed free agent and former All-Star Terry Cummings. Early into the season, they traded Todd Day and Alton Lister to the Boston Celtics for Sherman Douglas, and dealt Eric Murdock to the expansion Vancouver Grizzlies for Benoit Benjamin. The Bucks, led by developing superstars Vin Baker and Glenn Robinson were considered a team with playoff potential. However, their struggles continued as they posted a 15-game losing streak in March. The Bucks missed the playoffs for the fifth straight season, finishing seventh in the Central Division with a disappointing 25–57 record. Baker was selected for the 1996 NBA All-Star Game.

Following the season, head coach Mike Dunleavy was fired, Lee Mayberry signed as a free agent with the Vancouver Grizzlies, Marty Conlon signed with the Boston Celtics, and Cummings and Benjamin were both released.

For the season, the Bucks added green alternate road uniforms which lasted until 1999.

1998–99 Phoenix Suns season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the 31st season for the Phoenix Suns in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Suns signed free agent Tom Gugliotta while acquiring Luc Longley from the Chicago Bulls. Head coach Danny Ainge returned for his third season as the team finished tied for third in the Pacific Division with a record of 27–23 in the shortened lockout season. The 7th-seeded Suns made the playoffs for the 11th consecutive season before being swept in the first round to the 2nd-seeded and Pacific winner-Portland Trail Blazers, three games to zero. All home games were played in America West Arena.

Starting point guard Jason Kidd finished the regular season leading the league in assists per game at 10.8. Three Suns would average 16 points or more per game, with Gugliotta notching 17, Kidd 16.9 and Clifford Robinson at 16.4 per game. Kidd led the league in total minutes played and was third in total steals, before being selected to both the All-NBA and All-Defensive First Teams. Following the season, Danny Manning was traded to the Orlando Magic, who then traded him to the Milwaukee Bucks two weeks later, and George McCloud signed as a free agent with the Denver Nuggets.

2019–20 Chicago Bulls season

The 2019–20 Chicago Bulls season will be the 54th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Chicago Tribune Silver Basketball

The Chicago Tribune Silver Basketball was an award that was presented annually by the Chicago Tribune to the Most Valuable Player of the Big Ten Conference for both men's and women's basketball in the United States through 2007. The Chicago Tribune awarded the Silver Basketball for men's basketball beginning in 1946. The Silver Basketball for women's basketball was first presented in 1988. The awards were voted on by the head coaches of the Big Ten basketball teams and the Chicago Tribune staff.

Gary Trent

Gary Dajaun Trent Sr. (born September 22, 1974) is an American retired professional basketball player.

List of National Basketball Association players (R)

This is a list of National Basketball Association players whose last names begin with R.

The list also includes players from the American National Basketball League (NBL), the Basketball Association of America (BAA), and the original American Basketball Association (ABA). All of these leagues contributed to the formation of the present-day NBA.

Individuals who played in the NBL prior to its 1949 merger with the BAA are listed in italics, as they are not traditionally listed in the NBA's official player registers.

List of U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards

This article lists U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards. Several different organizations sponsor an award for the nation's top player.

Michigan State Spartans men's basketball

The Michigan State Spartans men's basketball team represents Michigan State University (MSU) and compete in the Big Ten Conference of NCAA Division I College basketball. Their home games are played at the Breslin Student Events Center. Tom Izzo has been the head coach since 1995. The Spartans have won two NCAA championships and 15 Big Ten Conference Championships. Their two National Championships came in the 1979 NCAA Tournament and the 2000 NCAA Tournament. The 1979 National Championship Game was the most watched college basketball game in history, with 35.11 million television viewers. The 1979 National Championship team was coached by Jud Heathcote and included tournament MVP Magic Johnson, Greg Kelser and Jay Vincent. The Spartans defeated the previously unbeaten Indiana State Sycamores, led by future Hall of Famer Larry Bird. The 2000 National Championship team defeated the Florida Gators men's basketball team in the final. The team was coached by Tom Izzo and led by players Morris Peterson, Charlie Bell, Jason Richardson and tournament MVP Mateen Cleaves.

The Spartans have participated in 33 NCAA tournaments and in 22 consecutive NCAA tournaments (1998–2019), the fourth-longest streak ever and third-longest active streak in college basketball, behind Kansas (29) and Duke (23). Michigan State has the sixth most all-time Final Four appearances with ten (1957, 1979, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2015, and 2019). The program is also ninth all-time in NCAA tournament winning percentage (.677, through 2018).

Milwaukee Bucks all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Milwaukee Bucks NBA franchise.

Near East B.C.

A.O. Near East B.C. is one of the oldest professional basketball clubs in Greece. The basketball club was founded in 1927. The team is located in Kaisariani, Greece, which is a suburb of the city of Athens, Greece. Near East's home arena, Near East Indoor Arena, is located only about 2 miles from the downtown center of Athens. It takes its name from the Near East Foundation.

Sporting News Men's College Basketball Player of the Year

The Sporting News Men's College Basketball Player of the Year is an annual basketball award given to the best men's basketball player in NCAA Division I competition. The award was first given following the 1942–43 season and is presented by Sporting News (formerly The Sporting News), an American–based sports magazine that was established in 1886.

No award winners were selected from 1947–49 and from 1952–57. Repeat winners of the Sporting News Player of the Year award are rare; as of 2016, it has occurred only six times in the award's 63 presentations. Of those six repeat winners, only Oscar Robertson of Cincinnati and Bill Walton of UCLA have been named the player of the year three times.

UCLA and Duke have the most all-time with seven. North Carolina has the second most with five winners.

Spójnia Stargard

Spójnia Stargard, also known as shortly Spójnia, is a professional Polish basketball team based in Stargard, Poland, currently playing in the Polish Basketball League (PLK), the highest tier in Polish basketball. In 2018, they gained promotion from the I Liga.Spójnia hosts its games at the Hala Miejska.

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