Shano Collins

John Francis "Shano" Collins (December 4, 1885 – September 10, 1955) was an American right fielder and first baseman in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox.

In 1910, Collins played first base for the White Sox, but he was quickly moved to right field, where he would enjoy a reputation for having one of the strongest throwing arms in baseball. He won a World Series with the Sox in 1917, delivering the game-winning hit in the pennant-clinching game. He batted .286 (6 for 21) in the 1917 World Series, going 3-for-4 in Game 1. In 1918, he set a record with three bases-loaded triples in one season, which would stand alone for 31 years until Elmer Valo tied the mark in 1949.[1] Collins still holds the MLB career record of eight triples with the bases loaded.[2]

During the notorious 1919 World Series, tainted by the Black Sox Scandal, Collins went 4-for-16 at the plate for the White Sox. He was not among those implicated in the scandal.

In 1921, he was traded to the Red Sox, with whom he finished his career. In 1930, he was named manager of the Red Sox, but he only won a total of 73 games in parts of two seasons. He was fired after 55 games in 1931.

In the indictments of the key figures in the Black Sox scandal, Collins is named as the wronged party. The indictment claims that by throwing the World Series the alleged conspirators defrauded him of $1,784 dollars.[3]

Collins died in Newton, Massachusetts, at age 69.

Shano Collins
Shano Collins
Rightfielder / First baseman / Manager
Born: December 4, 1885
Charlestown, Massachusetts
Died: September 10, 1955 (aged 69)
Newton, Massachusetts
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 21, 1910, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
May 15, 1925, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.264
Home runs22
Runs batted in708
Managerial record73–134
Winning %.353
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Facts

  • "Shano" was a nickname given to him while on the White Sox, which is a play on the Gaelic equivalent of his name, Sean.
  • His grandson, Bob Gallagher, played first base for the Red Sox, Astros and Mets from 1972 to 1975.

Career Statistics

In 16 seasons, Collins compiled a .264 batting average (1687-7030), with 747 runs, 22 home runs, 708 RBI, .306 on-base percentage and .364 slugging percentage. In 10 World Series games, he hit .270 (10-37) with four runs scored. His career fielding percentage was .973.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Charlton's Baseball Chronology". www.baseballlibrary.com. Archived from the original on 28 July 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2013.
  2. ^ "Career Triples Records" Check |url= value (help). baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved 4 April 2012.
  3. ^ http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/blacksox/indictpartic.html

External links

1915 Chicago White Sox season

The 1915 Chicago White Sox season involved the White Sox finishing third in the American League.

With the acquisitions of Eddie Collins (over the winter) and Joe Jackson (in August), Chicago now had the two hitters they needed to win the 1917 and 1919 AL pennants.

1916 Chicago White Sox season

The 1916 Chicago White Sox finished second in the American League, just two games behind the first-place Boston Red Sox. By this time, the nucleus of the 1917–19 dynasty was in place. Chicago would win the World Series the following season.

1917 Chicago White Sox season

The 1917 Chicago White Sox dominated the American League with a record of 100–54. The 100 wins is a club record that still stands. Their offense was first in runs scored while their pitching staff led the league with a 2.16 ERA.

Facing the New York Giants in the 1917 World Series, the team clinched the series in six games, thanks in large part to the workhorse efforts of Eddie Cicotte and Red Faber. It would be the team's last world championship until 2005.

1918 Chicago White Sox season

Depleted of most of their stars due to World War I, the Chicago White Sox had a relatively bad year in 1918, going 57–67 and finishing in the second division. They had won the American League pennant in 1917 and would win another in 1919.

1919 Chicago White Sox season

The 1919 Chicago White Sox season was their 19th season in the American League. They won 88 games to advance to the World Series but lost to the Cincinnati Reds. More significantly, some of the players were found to have taken money from gamblers in return for throwing the series. The "Black Sox Scandal" had permanent ramifications for baseball, including the establishment of the office of Commissioner of Baseball.

1920 Chicago White Sox season

The 1920 Chicago White Sox season was a season in American baseball. The team was in contention to defend their American League pennant going into the final week of the season. However, for all intents and purposes, the season ended on September 26, when news of the Black Sox Scandal became public. Owner Charles Comiskey suspended the five players who were still active (the sixth, ringleader Chick Gandil, opted to retire after the 1919 season). At that time, the White Sox were only a half-game behind the Cleveland Indians, but went 2–2 over their last four games to finish two games out. They would not finish in the first division again until 1936.

1921 Boston Red Sox season

The 1921 Boston Red Sox season was the 21st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses.

1922 Boston Red Sox season

The 1922 Boston Red Sox season was the 22nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 61 wins and 93 losses.

1923 Boston Red Sox season

The 1923 Boston Red Sox season was the 23rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 61 wins and 91 losses.

1931 Boston Red Sox season

The 1931 Boston Red Sox season was the 31st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 62 wins and 90 losses.

1931 Major League Baseball season

The 1931 Major League Baseball season.

1932 Boston Red Sox season

The 1932 Boston Red Sox season was the 32nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 43 wins and 111 losses. The team set franchise records for fewest wins, most losses, and lowest winning percentage (.279) in a season—these records still stand through the end of the 2018 season.

1932 Major League Baseball season

The 1932 Major League Baseball season.

Bob Gallagher (baseball)

Robert Collins Gallagher (born July 7, 1948 in Newton, Massachusetts) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1972 through 1975 for the Boston Red Sox (1972), Houston Astros (1973–74) and New York Mets (1975).Listed at 6' 3", 185 lb., he batted and threw left-handed. His grandfather, Shano Collins, was a Major League outfielder/manager and a player in the 1917 and 1919 World Series.

In a four-season career, Gallagher was a .220 hitter (56-for-255) with two home runs and 13 RBI in 213 games played, including 34 runs, one triple, and one stolen base.

He had been teaching high school social studies for the last 25 years at Santa Cruz High School in Santa Cruz, California. In 2010, he retired from teaching and currently works as a substitute teacher for Santa Cruz High School.

Ollie Marquardt

Albert Ludwig "Ollie" Marquardt (September 22, 1902 – February 7, 1968) was a second baseman in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the Boston Red Sox during the 1931 season. Listed at 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m), 156 lb., Marquardt batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Toledo, Ohio.

Marquardt appeared in 17 games for the hapless 1931 Red Sox as a 28-year-old rookie. He was just one of nine second basemen tried by manager Shano Collins, in a team that finished 6th in American League with a 59–93 record. In 15 fielding appearances, Marquardt played at second base (13), shortstop (1) and third, compiling a collective .947 fielding percentage. He was a .179 hitter (7-for-39) with one double, two RBI and four runs without home runs. He later became a successful minor league manager, posting a 293–189 record for the Class-B Cedar Rapids Raiders of the Three-I League from 1939 through 1942 –including three consecutive championship titles (1940–42)–, and leading the 1944 Toledo Mud Hens to a 95–58 finish in the American Association.

Marquardt died in Port Clinton, Ohio at age 65.

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