Shannon Sharpe

Shannon Sharpe (born June 26, 1968) is a former American football tight end who played for the Denver Broncos and Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL), as well as a former analyst for CBS Sports on its NFL telecasts. He is a TV presenter who co-hosts Skip and Shannon: Undisputed with Skip Bayless.

Sharpe was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on August 6, 2011. He played 12 seasons for the Broncos (1990–99, 2002–03) and two with the Ravens (2000–01), winning three Super Bowls and finishing his career as the NFL’s all-time leader in receptions (815), receiving yards (10,060) and receiving touchdowns (62) by a tight end,[1] until Tony Gonzalez and Jason Witten surpassed all three of those records. He was the first tight end to amass over 10,000 receiving yards.[2] He was named to the First Team of the NFL's All-Decade Team of the 1990s.[1]

Shannon Sharpe
Shannon Sharpe at Super Bowl XLI pre-game show in Miami
No. 81, 84, 82
Position:Tight end
Personal information
Born:June 26, 1968 (age 50)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:228 lb (103 kg)
Career information
High school:Glennville (GA)
College:Savannah State
NFL Draft:1990 / Round: 7 / Pick: 192
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:815
Receiving yards:10,060
Touchdowns:62
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Shannon, the younger brother of former NFL star wide receiver Sterling Sharpe, grew up poor in Glennville, Georgia. He once joked, "We were so poor, a robber once broke into our house and we ended up robbing the robber."[3] He commented, "I was a terrible student. I didn't graduate magna cum laude, I graduated 'Thank you, Lawdy!'"[4] At Savannah State, he played football and basketball, and also competed in track and field. In track, he competed in jumping and throwing events. He had personal-bests of 6.73 meters in the long jump and 14.73 meters in the triple jump. He also got a top throw of 42.06 meters in the discus throw.[5]

Sharpe was a three-time All-Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference selection from 1987 to 1989 and the SIAC Player of the Year in 1987. He was also selected as a Kodak Division II All-American in 1989. He led the Tigers' football team to their best records in the program's history: 7-3 in 1988 and 8-1 in 1989. He was inducted into the Division II Football Hall of Fame in 2009.

NFL career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad
6 ft 1 14 in
(1.86 m)
221 lb
(100 kg)
33 in
(0.84 m)
10 in
(0.25 m)
4.67 s 1.61 s 2.81 s 1.25 s 34 in
(0.86 m)
10 ft 2 in
(3.10 m)
All values from NFL Combine[6]

Sharpe was drafted in the 7th round of the 1990 NFL Draft by the Denver Broncos, 192nd overall. He remained with Denver until 1999,[7] winning two championship rings in Super Bowl XXXII and Super Bowl XXXIII in the process. After the 1997 season[8] championship - his first - he appeared on General Mills' Wheaties boxes with four other Broncos. After a two-year stint with the Baltimore Ravens, where he won another championship ring in Super Bowl XXXV, he returned to the Broncos. He played there until 2003.[9] From there, he retired to become an NFL analyst for CBS.

Career statistics

Ozzie Newsome, the Ravens' general manager, said of Sharpe during his career: "I think he's a threat when he's on the field. He has to be double-teamed. He's a great route-runner. He's proven that he can make the big plays. That's what separates him. He's a threat." Sharpe was selected to the All-Pro Team 4 times, played in eight Pro Bowls (1992–1998, 2001) and amassed over 1,000 receiving yards in three different seasons. In a 1993 playoff game against the Los Angeles Raiders, Sharpe tied a postseason record with 13 receptions for 156 yards and a touchdown. In the Ravens' 2000 AFC title game against the Raiders, he caught a short pass on 3rd down and 18 from his own four-yard line and took it 96 yards for a touchdown, the only touchdown the Ravens scored, en route to a 16-3 Ravens win. Sharpe also caught a 50+ yard pass in each of their other two playoff games. He finished his 14-year career with 815 receptions for 10,060 yards and 62 touchdowns in 203 games.

Career receiving statistics

Year Team Games Rec Yards Avg TDs
1990 Denver Broncos 16 7 99 14.1 1
1991 Denver Broncos 16 22 322 14.6 1
1992 Denver Broncos 16 53 640 12.1 2
1993 Denver Broncos 16 81 995 12.3 9
1994 Denver Broncos 15 87 1,010 11.6 4
1995 Denver Broncos 13 63 756 12 4
1996 Denver Broncos 15 80 1,062 13.3 10
1997 Denver Broncos 16 72 1,107 15.4 3
1998 Denver Broncos 16 64 768 12.0 10
1999 Denver Broncos 5 23 224 9.7 0
2000 Baltimore Ravens 16 67 810 12.1 5
2001 Baltimore Ravens 16 73 811 11.1 2
2002 Denver Broncos 12 61 686 11.2 3
2003 Denver Broncos 15 62 770 12.4 8
Total 203 815 10,060 12.3 62

Controversies

Sharpe's girlfriend Michelle Bundy filed for a restraining order against him on September 9, 2010, in an Atlanta court.[10] Bundy accused Sharpe of sexual assault and threatening her life, according to legal documents obtained by SportsByBrooks. Bundy claimed she was forced to have sex with Sharpe and that Sharpe called and threatened her life, placed her under surveillance and would call to say he was watching her.[11][12] The restraining order was dismissed the following week, with Bundy accused of fabricating her claims against Sharpe.[13]

Post-playing career

Sharpe was a commentator for the CBS Sports pregame show The NFL Today, including the Sprint Halftime Report and the Subway Postgame Show, replacing Deion Sanders and co-hosting with James Brown (formerly with Fox NFL Sunday), former NFL quarterbacks Dan Marino and Boomer Esiason, as well as former coach Bill Cowher.[14] In the 2004 NFL regular season,[15] Sharpe defeated Marino and Esiason in the pick 'em game of The NFL Today with a 53-21 record. His critics say that his broadcasting skills are hurt by his poor grammar and enunciation of words (Sharpe has a very noticeable lisp and drawl). A satirical article on The Onion joked "CBS Producers Ask Shannon Sharpe To Use at Least 3 Real Words Per Sentence."[16] On February 18, 2014, it was announced that Sharpe, along with Dan Marino were being relieved of their duties as on-air commentators on The NFL Today and were being replaced by Tony Gonzalez and Bart Scott.[17]

In 2013, Sharpe became a columnist and spokesperson for FitnessRX For Men magazine and appeared on their September 2013 cover.

Sharpe currently hosts Sirius NFL Radio's Opening Drive morning program, alongside Bob Papa.

Sharpe was among the 17 finalists being considered for enshrinement at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2009. However, he was passed over in his first year in a class that included Bruce Smith, Ralph Wilson, Derrick Thomas and Rod Woodson. On October 23, 2009, the NCAA Division II Football Hall of Fame announced that Sharpe would be inducted in December of that year. In addition, Savannah State University also retired Sharpe's No. 2 jersey.[18]

On November 28, 2010, Sharpe was nominated as semi-finalist for induction into the 2011 Pro Football Hall of Fame, along with Art Modell and 24 others, among them Jerome Bettis, Roger Craig, Marshall Faulk, and Deion Sanders. Subsequently, on February 6, 2011, Shannon Sharpe was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Sharpe was escorted to the Hall of Fame ceremony by Canton native Haley Smith, continuing the tradition of pageant winners escorting the inductees.[19] He also appeared on the American Dad! episode "The Scarlett Getter", portraying himself.

Sharpe joined Skip Bayless in FS1's new debate show Skip and Shannon: Undisputed which premiered on September 6, 2016.[20]

References

  1. ^ a b "Hall of Famers » SHANNON SHARPE". profootballhof.com. Retrieved September 13, 2014.
  2. ^ "Shannon Sharpe News, Videos, Photos, and PodCasts - ESPN". search.espn.go.com. Retrieved September 13, 2014.
  3. ^ Saunders, Patrick (February 6, 2011). "The life and times of Hall of Famer Shannon Sharpe". The Denver Post. Retrieved July 27, 2011.
  4. ^ "Sharpe Retrospective". Sports Illustrated. May 17, 2004. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved July 27, 2011.
  5. ^ "Shannon Sharpe". trackingfootball.com. Archived from the original on October 24, 2014.
  6. ^ "Shannon Sharpe - TE - Savannah State (GA) - NFL Combine Results". nflcombineresults.com.
  7. ^ "NFL History by Decade". nfl.com.
  8. ^ "NFL History by Decade". nfl.com.
  9. ^ "NFL History by Decade". nfl.com.
  10. ^ Petchesky, Barry (September 14, 2010). "Is CBS Letting Shannon Sharpe's Domestic Violence Case Slide?". Deadspin. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  11. ^ "Shannon Sharpe Accused of Sexual Assault". CBS News. September 15, 2010. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  12. ^ "Sharpe charged with misdemeanor battery". ESPN.com. Associated Press. August 6, 2004. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  13. ^ Jabali-Nash, Naimah (September 16, 2010). "Shannon Sharpe Update: Restraining Order Dismissed, Michele Bundy 'Infatuated,' Says Acquaintance". CBS News. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  14. ^ NFL Today - CBSSports.com Archived June 16, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
  15. ^ "NFL History by Decade". www.nfl.com.
  16. ^ "The Onion - America's Finest News Source". onionsportsnetwork.com.
  17. ^ Nate Davis (February 18, 2014). "CBS hires Tony Gonzalez, parts with two Hall-of-Fame analysts". usatoday.com. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  18. ^ Denver, The (October 23, 2009). "Former Bronco Sharpe going into D-II hall". The Denver Post. Retrieved July 19, 2010.
  19. ^ "Bleacher Report". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on February 8, 2011.
  20. ^ Pugmire, Lance (August 29, 2016). "Skip Bayless rising early, promises 'deeper' debate for new Fox Sports 1 show". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 7, 2016.

External links

1990 NFL Draft

The 1990 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 22–23, 1990, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

The Dallas Cowboys would have had the #1 overall pick in the draft for the second consecutive year by virtue of their league-worst 1–15 record in 1989. However, the Cowboys forfeited their first-round pick by selecting quarterback Steve Walsh in the first round of the previous year's supplemental draft. The first pick instead went to the Atlanta Falcons, who traded it to the Indianapolis Colts.

2000 Baltimore Ravens season

The 2000 Baltimore Ravens season was the franchise's fifth season in the National Football League (NFL) and the second under head coach Brian Billick.

The Ravens concluded their season with a 12–4 record, thus finishing in second place in the AFC Central, earning them a spot in the playoffs as a wild card team. The Ravens won three straight games in the 2000 AFC playoffs, culminating in a trip to Tampa, Florida for Super Bowl XXXV, where they defeated the New York Giants, 34–7. The team's defense, which set a league record for fewest points allowed in a 16-game regular season with 10.3 points per game, is considered among the greatest of all time.

Though just five seasons removed from their relocation from Cleveland, only two players (Matt Stover and Larry Webster) remained from the 1995 Cleveland Browns roster.

2001 Baltimore Ravens season

The 2001 Baltimore Ravens season was the franchise’s sixth season in the National Football League (NFL) and the third under head coach Brian Billick.

Fresh off their victory trip from Super Bowl XXXV, bad news struck the 2001 Ravens as running back Jamal Lewis suffered a knee injury in training camp and would miss the entire season. This weakened the Ravens’ running game and defense, and they also failed to equal their 12–4 record from 2000, instead going 10–6 but eventually reaching the postseason for the second consecutive year.

They easily shut down the Miami Dolphins, 20–3 in the Wild Card Round, but were unable to stop the 13–3 Pittsburgh Steelers, in the next round, due to a series of turnovers and penalties.

2003 Denver Broncos season

The 2003 Denver Broncos season was the team's 44th year in professional football and its 34th with the National Football League.

After the departure of Brian Griese, who signed with his father's team, the Dolphins, the Broncos acquired Jake Plummer, who had been struggling in recent years with Arizona.

After two seasons of mediocrity, the Broncos rebounded with a 10-6 record. Denver's season ended with a 41-10 blowout to the Indianapolis Colts in the Wildcard round. Following the season, Clinton Portis was traded to the Washington Redskins, and Shannon Sharpe and Ed McCaffrey both retired.

Denver Broncos

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver, Colorado. The Broncos compete as a member club of the National Football League (NFL)'s American Football Conference (AFC) West division. They began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) and joined the NFL as part of the merger in 1970. The Broncos are owned by the Pat Bowlen trust and currently play home games at Broncos Stadium at Mile High (formerly known as Invesco Field at Mile High from 2001–2010 and Sports Authority Field at Mile High from 2011–2017). Prior to that, they played at Mile High Stadium from 1960 to 2000.

The Broncos were barely competitive during their 10-year run in the AFL and their first seven years in the NFL. They did not complete a winning season until 1973. In 1977, four years later, they qualified for the playoffs for the first time in franchise history and advanced to Super Bowl XII. Since 1975, the Broncos have become one of the NFL's most successful teams, having suffered only seven losing seasons. They have won eight AFC Championships (1977, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 1998, 2013, 2015), and three Super Bowl championships (1997 (XXXII), 1998 (XXXIII), 2015 (50)), and share the NFL record for most Super Bowl losses (5 — tied with the New England Patriots). They have nine players in the Pro Football Hall of Fame: John Elway, Floyd Little, Shannon Sharpe, Gary Zimmerman, Willie Brown, Tony Dorsett, Terrell Davis, Brian Dawkins, Champ Bailey.

Dwayne Carswell

Dwayne Carswell (born January 18, 1972) is a retired American football tight end and offensive lineman who played from 1994-2005 for the Denver Broncos in the National Football League. He was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the Broncos in 1994. He played college football at Liberty University.

Carswell won two Super Bowl rings with the Broncos in 1998 and 1999 and was selected to the Pro Bowl in 2001. His first career reception came on a five-yard pass from Hall of Fame quarterback John Elway. Carswell received the Ed Block Courage Award, after suffering season-ending internal injuries in October 2005, in a car crash in Aurora, Colorado. Carswell was signed by the Orlando Predators of the Arena Football League in January 2007. However, he was waived the next month.

Glennville, Georgia

Glennville is a city in Tattnall County, Georgia, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 3,569.

Jason Witten

Christopher Jason Witten (born May 6, 1982) is an American football tight end for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Tennessee, and was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the third round of the 2003 NFL Draft. Witten ranks second in all-time career receptions and receiving yards by an NFL tight end, trailing only Tony Gonzalez. Initially retiring in 2018, he became a color analyst for ESPN's Monday Night Football.

Jenny Taft

Jenny Taft (born September 5, 1987) is an American sports television personality, serving as the moderator on Fox Sports 1's Skip and Shannon: Undisputed. Taft additionally works as a lead college football sideline reporter on Fox Sports 1 (FS1) broadcasts. Her broadcasting career began with the Fox Sports North (FSN) regional affiliate.

Joy Taylor

Joy Allison Taylor (born January 17, 1987) is an American radio personality and television host for Fox Sports 1. Taylor is currently the news update anchor on Fox Sports 1's The Herd with Colin Cowherd and previously the moderator for Fox Sports 1's studio show Skip and Shannon: Undisputed with commentators Skip Bayless and Shannon Sharpe..

List of AFC Championship Game broadcasters

The following is a list of the television and radio networks and announcers who have broadcast the American Football Conference Championship Game throughout the years. The years listed concentrate on the season instead of the calendar year that the game took place. The forerunner to the AFC Championship Game (prior to the 1970 AFL–NFL merger) was the AFL Championship Game.

List of Pittsburgh Steelers figures in broadcasting

The Steelers franchise has a rich history of producing well-known sportscasters over the years: the most famous of which is Myron Cope, who served as a Steelers radio color commentator for 35 seasons (1970-2004).

Additionally, several former players for the Pittsburgh Steelers picked up the broadcast microphone:

Lynn Swann (wide receiver, 1974-1982) - Starting in 1978 was a sideline reporter for ABC Sports. Over the 2005 and 2006 NFL seasons, he had taken a leave of absence to unsuccessfully pursue the governor's office of Pennsylvania. Swann has also had several Hollywood roles, making cameos in 1998's The Waterboy, 1993's The Program and 1991's The Last Boy Scout. His TV cameos include Saturday Night Live and The Drew Carey Show.

Merril Hoge (running back, 1987-1993) - Has hosted sports shows on ESPN and ESPN2 since 1996 most notably NFL Matchup, Football Friday and NFL 2Night/ NFLLive. He has also had hosting duties on ABC/ESPN's Great Outdoor Games. He also served as an analyst for the Steelers radio network alongside Bill Hillgrove and the late Myron Cope.

Mark Malone (quarterback, 1980-1987) - Began his career as a sports reporter for Pittsburgh's WPXI-TV from 1991–1994, from 1994 to 2004 he hosted nationally-televised sports shows for ESPN, including NFL 2Night, NFL Matchup and the X-Games. From 2004-2008 he was director of sports broadcasting at CBS2 Chicago. Now Hosts his own program weeknights from 7 PM - 10 PM on NBC Sports Radio.

Jerome Bettis (running back, 1998-2011) - Formerly an analyst of NBC Sunday Night Football's Football Night in America pre-game with Bob Costas 2006–2009, also is host of the Pittsburgh broadcast The Jerome Bettis Show 1998–2007 on KDKA-TV and 2007-Present on WPXI-TV.

Hines Ward (wide receiver, 1996-2005) - Former analyst of NBC Sunday Night Football's Football Night in America. Pregame/halftime analyst for Notre Dame Football on NBC (2013–2015), Now is a Sports Analyst for CNN since 2016 and hosts The Hines Ward Show 2013–Present on WPXI-TV.

Bill Cowher (head coach, 1992-2006) - Co-host of CBS Sports NFL Today on CBS as a studio analyst, joining Dan Marino, Shannon Sharpe, and Boomer Esiason. Cowher had a cameo in 1998's The Waterboy, and in 2007 Cowher appeared in the ABC reality television series Fast Cars and Superstars: The Gillette Young Guns Celebrity Race, featuring a dozen celebrities in a stock car racing competition. Cowher matched up against Gabrielle Reece and William Shatner. Cowher has also made a cameo in The Dark Knight Rises with several other Steelers players, as the coach of the Gotham Rogues.

Terry Bradshaw (quarterback, 1970-1983) - Started as a Guest commentator for CBS NFL Playoff broadcasts from 1980–1982, after retirement he joined Verne Lundquist at CBS full-time as a game anaylst on what would become one of the top rated sports broadcasts. In 1990, he went from the broadcast booth to the pre-game studio shows anchoring the NFL Today pre-game shows on CBS and later on Fox NFL Sunday. He has in recent years started to host regular features in addition to the show, "Ten yards with TB" and the "Terry Awards". In addition to broadcasting Bradshaw has had appearances in several major motion pictures (most notably Smokey and the Bandit II, Black Sunday, and Failure to Launch) as well as spokesman for Radio Shack and SaniKing among others in commercials. He also has made many guest appearances on sitcoms from Married... with Children to Evening Shade and Wee Willie Winkie.

Kordell Stewart (quarterback 1998-2003) - Currently an ESPN Analyst for all NFL shows and an Analyst for TuneIn's NFL Coverage.

Tunch Ilkin (offensive tackle, 1980–1992) - current Steelers radio color commentator; Pittsburgh CW Network In the Locker Room Host 2006–Present.

Craig Wolfley (offensive lineman, 1980-1989) - current Steelers radio sideline reporter; Pittsburgh CW Network In the Locker Room Host 2006–Present.

Rod Woodson (defensive back, 1987–1996), (1997 with 49ers), (1998-2001 with Ravens), & (2002-2003 with Raiders) - current Analysts for NFL Network 2003–Present.

Jack Ham (linebacker, 1971–1982) - did color commentary for the Steelers on KDKA-TV during the NFL Preseason into the early 2000s before leaving and being replaced by former teammate Edmund Nelson. Ham also co-hosted some pregame and postgame shows on the station, but was replaced by Nelson in those roles as well. Since 2000, Ham has been the color analyst on the Penn State football radio network.

Edmund Nelson (defensive lineman, 1982-1988) - served as the color analyst for Pittsburgh Steelers pre-season games and participated as a co-host to Bob Pompeani in KDKA-TV's regular season pre-game program Steelers Kickoff until retiring in 2015.

Charlie Batch (quarterback, 2002-2012) - took a Steelers pre-game studio analyst job with KDKA-TV for the 2013 season alongside KDKA-TV sports anchor Bob Pompeani and ex-Steeler defensive lineman Edmund Nelson, effectively ending his NFL career. He continued in this role for the 2014 season. In 2015, Batch replaced the retiring Nelson as KDKA-TV's color commentator for preseason games, while becoming the main studio analyst for the Steelers pre-game coverage prior to the national airing of The NFL Today. Former teammate Chris Hoke replaced Nelson for the post-game show.

Tony Dungy (defensive back, 1977-1979) - as an analyst on NBC's Football Night in America.

NFL Street

NFL Street is an American football video game developed by EA Tiburon and published by Electronic Arts. It was originally released for the PlayStation 2, GameCube and Xbox on January 13, 2004. Barry Sanders of the Detroit Lions, Shannon Sharpe of the Denver Broncos, and Ricky Williams of the Miami Dolphins grace the cover. The game was followed by NFL Street 2 and NFL Street 3.

Skip Bayless

Skip Bayless (born John Edward Bayless II December 4, 1951) is an American sports columnist, author, and television personality. He is well known for his work as a commentator on the ESPN2 show, First Take, with Stephen A. Smith, a show which he left in June 2016. Bayless debuted his new show Skip and Shannon: Undisputed with Shannon Sharpe on Fox Sports 1 September 6, 2016.

Sterling Sharpe

Sterling Sharpe (born April 6, 1965) is a former American football wide receiver and analyst for the NFL Network. He attended the University of South Carolina, and played from 1988 to 1994 with the Green Bay Packers in a career shortened by injuries.

Super Bowl XXXIII

Super Bowl XXXIII was an American football game played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion and defending Super Bowl XXXII champion Denver Broncos and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Atlanta Falcons to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1998 season. The Broncos defeated the Falcons by the score of 34–19, winning their second consecutive Super Bowl. The game was played on January 31, 1999, at Pro Player Stadium in Miami, Florida (now part of the suburb of Miami Gardens, which became a separate city in 2003).

The defending Super Bowl champion Broncos entered the game with an AFC-best 14–2 regular season record. The Falcons, under former Denver head coach Dan Reeves, were making their first Super Bowl appearance after also posting a 14–2 regular season record.

Aided by quarterback John Elway's 80-yard touchdown pass to receiver Rod Smith, Denver scored 17 consecutive points to build a 17–3 lead in the second quarter from which Atlanta could not recover. At 38 years old, Elway became the oldest player, at the time, to be named Super Bowl MVP (Tom Brady became the oldest in 2017 at the age of 39, coincidentally also against the Atlanta Falcons). In the final game of his career, he completed 18 of 29 passes for 336 yards with one touchdown and one interception, and also scored a 3-yard rushing touchdown. Elway retired on May 2, 1999 before the following season.

The Scarlett Getter

"The Scarlett Getter" is the sixth episode of the eighth season of the animated comedy series American Dad!. It aired on Fox in the United States on November 27, 2011. The episode plot mainly revolves around Francine, who accidentally leads Roger to a dangerous alien hunter while trying to get revenge on Stan.This episode was written by Matt Fusfeld and Alex Cuthbertson and directed by Josue Cervantes. This episode generally received positive reviews. It features from guest performances from Sharon Lawrence and Shannon Sharpe, as well as several recurring voice actors and actresses from the series.

Wade Harman

Wade Harman (born October 1, 1963) is an American football coach who is the tight ends coach for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). Harman used to be the Assistant Offensive Line Coach for the Falcons working with veteran offensive line coach Mike Tice.Before being hired by the Falcons, Harman spent most of his career as a tight end coach for the Baltimore Ravens. He was fired on January 27, 2014. Harman began his NFL coaching career with the Minnesota Vikings. Until his dismissal, Harman was the longest tenured coach in the Baltimore Ravens organization, and the only coach remaining in the organization from the Super Bowl XXXV team.

Shannon Sharpe

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