Shannon Clavelle

Shannon Lynn Clavelle (born October 12, 1973) is a former American football defensive end in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs.[1] He played college football at the University of Colorado.[2]

Clavelle was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in the sixth round (185th overall) of the 1995 NFL Draft. He debuted in the NFL though with the Green Bay Packers in 1995. He played on the Packers Super Bowl XXXI Championship team of 1996. In 1997, he played six games with the Packers and finished his career that year playing in one game with the Kansas City Chiefs.[3]

Shannon Clavelle
No. 91
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:October 12, 1973 (age 45)
Lafayette, Louisiana
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:287 lb (130 kg)
Career information
High school:O. Perry Walker
(New Orleans, Louisiana)
College:Colorado
NFL Draft:1995 / Round: 6 / Pick: 185
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games Played:16
Sacks:0.5
Fumble recoveries:0
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ "Shannon Clavelle Stats". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  2. ^ "1994 Roster: Shannon Clavelle". University of Colorado Athletics. 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  3. ^ "Shannon Clavelle". The Pro Football Archives. 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
1994 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1994 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1994 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1994 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1994 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 1994 Colorado Buffaloes football team represented the University of Colorado at Boulder in the 1994 college football season. The Buffaloes offense scored 439 points while the defense allowed 235 points. The team was led by head coach Bill McCartney.

The Buffaloes' only loss of the season came on the road against eventual consensus national champion Nebraska. Colorado, ranked #2 at the time, was in line to play for the national title as part of the Bowl Coalition. They were leapfrogged in the polls by the Cornhuskers, who had been ranked #3, and finished the regular season ranked #4.

The Buffaloes competed in the 1995 Fiesta Bowl, which they won 41–24 over unranked Notre Dame.

The problem of scheduling bowl match-ups for top-ranked teams led to the dissolution of the Bowl Coalition and the creation of the Bowl Alliance (#2 ranked Penn State was not eligible as a member of the Big Ten Conference to play the #1 ranked team). Notre Dame, playing as an independent, had its own agreement with the Bowl Coalition, which allowed the Fiesta Bowl to choose them as an at-large opponent over more highly ranked teams.

1995 Buffalo Bills season

The 1995 Buffalo Bills season was the 36th season for the club and its 26th in the National Football League.

1995 Fiesta Bowl

The 1995 IBM OS/2 Fiesta Bowl, played on January 2, 1995, was the 24th edition of the Fiesta Bowl. The game featured the Colorado Buffaloes and Notre Dame Fighting Irish.

1995 Green Bay Packers season

The 1995 Green Bay Packers season was their 77th season overall and their 75th in the National Football League. The Packers obtained an 11–5 mark in the regular season and won the NFC Central, their first division title since 1972. In the playoffs, the Packers defeated the Atlanta Falcons at home and the defending champion San Francisco 49ers on the road before losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC Championship Game. Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the NFL's Most Valuable Player, the first of three such awards he would win.

This was the first season that the Packers played home games exclusively at Lambeau Field, after playing part of their home slate at Milwaukee County Stadium since 1953. After losing their home opener to St. Louis, the Packers would win an NFL-record 25 consecutive home games between the rest of 1995 and early in 1998.

1995 NFL Draft

The 1995 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 22–23, 1995 at the Paramount Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. At the time of the draft, the Raiders were still based in Los Angeles. They would officially return to Oakland after a 13-year hiatus in July 1995. Additionally, the former Los Angeles Rams had gotten approval to move to St. Louis shortly before the draft on April 13 (they would return to Los Angeles in 2016). The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

There were 32 picks in the first round of this draft as the two expansion teams each received two extra picks between the first and second rounds. The Carolina Panthers, having selected second in the 1995 NFL Expansion Draft, were awarded the first overall pick in this draft and the Jacksonville Jaguars, having picked first in the expansion draft, selected second. The Panthers, however, traded their number one pick to the Cincinnati Bengals for the Bengals' fifth overall pick and their fourth pick in the second round. The Panthers were also stripped of two later supplemental picks, numbers 61 and 191, for improperly recruiting the Pittsburgh Steelers Defensive Coordinator, Dom Capers, as their Head Coach.This marked only the third time to date in NFL History that two Hall of Fame players were selected by the same team in the same round (the other being the Bears in 1965 draft and the Ravens in the 1996 NFL Draft.) The Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected Warren Sapp with the 12th overall pick and Derrick Brooks with the 28th overall pick. The two future Hall of Famers would go on to lead a strong defense which contributed heavily to the win in Super Bowl XXXVII.

1996 Green Bay Packers season

The 1996 Green Bay Packers season was their 78th season overall and their 76th in the National Football League, which culminated with the franchise winning its third Super Bowl and league-record 12th NFL Championship. The Packers posted a league-best 13–3 regular season won-loss record, going 8–0 at home and 5–3 on the road. It was the first time since 1962 that the club went undefeated at home. Additionally, the Packers had the NFL's highest-scoring offense (456) and allowed the fewest points on defense (210). Green Bay was the first team to accomplish both feats in the same season since the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. They finished the season with the number one ranked offense, defense, and special teams. They also set a then NFL record for the fewest touchdowns allowed in a 16-game season, with 19. The Packers also allowed the fewest yards in the NFL and set a record for punt return yardage. Brett Favre won his second straight MVP award while also throwing for a career-high and league leading 39 touchdown passes.

In the postseason, the Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers in the divisional round and the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game. Green Bay beat the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI to win their third Super Bowl and twelfth NFL Championship.In 2007, the 1996 Packers were ranked as the 16th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. The 1996 Packers were ranked 6th-greatest Super Bowl team of all-time by a similar panel done by ESPN and released in 2007. As of 2019, the Packers are the only team since the implementation of the salary cap to score the most points and allow the fewest in the regular season.

1997 Green Bay Packers season

The 1997 Green Bay Packers season was their 79th season overall and their 77th in the National Football League. The season concluded with the team winning its second consecutive NFC championship, but losing in a 31–24 upset to John Elway's Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXII. The team narrowly missed its opportunity to post back-to-back Super Bowl wins.

After a dominating 1996 campaign which ended with a victory in Super Bowl XXXI, many expected the Packers to repeat as champions in 1997. During training camp, star safety LeRoy Butler, among others, said that the Packers had the chance to run the table and go 19–0. This opinion drew increased coverage from the media as the Packers notched impressive victories in all five preseason games. The undefeated hype ended quickly, however, when Green Bay lost week 2 in Philadelphia.

Following a relatively slow 3–2 start, the Packers caught fire in the second half of the season, finishing with a 13–3 regular season record and 8–0 home record for the second consecutive year. In the playoffs, Green Bay defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Lambeau Field in the divisional round, and San Francisco 49ers at 3Com Park in the NFC Championship. Some in the media dubbed the NFC title game as "the real Super Bowl" because of the 49ers' and Packers' league dominance, and the relative inferiority of the AFC in recent Super Bowls. Green Bay's win marked the third consecutive year the team had defeated San Francisco in the playoffs.

The Packers entered Super Bowl XXXII as 11 1/2-point favorites. The point spread was likely determined by Green Bay's victory in the previous Super Bowl, the AFC's string of 13 consecutive Super Bowl losses, and Denver's losses in four previous Super Bowls. The game itself was a seesaw battle, and one of the most exciting Super Bowls in history. The Broncos won the thriller 31–24, earning John Elway his first Super Bowl victory at the age of 37, and the first championship in franchise history. Years later, Brett Favre said the Broncos were far underrated, and credited Denver's innovative blitz packages and strategies, foreign to the league at that time, for confusing the Packers.

Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the league's MVP for the third year in a row in 1997. Favre was the first player in the history of the award to win three MVPs, and remains the only player to have won three MVPs consecutively. The Packers became the first team to have six NFL MVP award winners.The 1997 Packers are one of only two teams in NFL history to win seven games against teams that would go on to make the playoffs.

Colorado Buffaloes football

The Colorado Buffaloes football program represents the University of Colorado Boulder in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS level. The team is currently a member of the Pac-12 Conference, having previously been a charter member of the Big 12 Conference. Before joining the Big 12, they were members of the Big Eight Conference. The CU football team has played at Folsom Field since 1924. The Buffs all-time record is 694–493–36 (.583 winning percentage) prior to the Valero Alamo Bowl at the end of the 2016 season. Colorado won a National Championship in 1990. The football program is 23rd on the all-time win list and 30th in all-time winning percentage.

Fiesta Bowl

The Fiesta Bowl is an American college football bowl game played annually in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Between its origination in 1971 and 2006, the game was hosted in Tempe, Arizona at Sun Devil Stadium. Since 2007, it has been held at the State Farm Stadium in Glendale, Arizona.

Since 2016, it has been sponsored by PlayStation and officially known as the PlayStation Fiesta Bowl. For the January 2016 game, it was sponsored by BattleFrog, creators of the obstacle racing series featured in the ESPN program BattleFrog College Championship and Vizio for the December 2014 game. From 1996 through the January 2014 game, Frito-Lay was the bowl's title sponsor through its Tostitos tortilla chip brand. Other previous sponsors include IBM (1993–1995) and Sunkist (1986–1990).

In 1998, the Fiesta Bowl became part of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS), and before 2006 every four years (most recently in 2010) was the designee for the national championship game. Beginning with the 2014 season, Fiesta Bowl became a member of College Football Playoff, hosting a semifinal game every three years; all the teams playing in this bowl will be selected by the CFP Selection Committee in those years. The Fiesta Bowl has donated more than $12 million to charity.

List of Colorado Buffaloes in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Colorado Buffaloes football players in the NFL Draft.

Shannon (given name)

Shannon ("wise river") is an Irish name, Anglicised from Sionainn. Alternative spellings include Shannen, Shanon, Shannan, Seanan, and Siannon. The variant Shanna is an Anglicisation of Sionna ("possessor of wisdom").

Sionainn derives from the Irish name Abha na tSionainn for the River Shannon. Because the suffix ain indicates a diminutive in Irish, the name is sometimes mistranslated as "little wise one".

Another reported derivation is from Ó Seanaigh, "descendent of Seanach," which yielded the surnames Shanahan and Shannon.

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