Shadow Racing Cars

Shadow Racing Cars was a Formula One and sports car racing team, founded and initially based in the United States although later Formula One operations were run from the British base in Northampton.[1] The team held an American licence from 1973 to 1975 and a British licence from 1976 to 1980, thus becoming the first constructor to officially change its nationality.[2][3] Their only F1 victory, at the 1977 Austrian Grand Prix, was achieved as a British team.[4]

Shadow
UOP Shadow logo
Full nameShadow Racing Cars Inc.
BaseNorthampton, United Kingdom
Founder(s)United States Don Nichols
Noted staffUnited Kingdom Jackie Oliver
United Kingdom Alan Rees
Mexico Jo Ramírez
Noted driversFrance Jean-Pierre Jarier
Australia Alan Jones
United Kingdom Tom Pryce
United States Peter Revson
United States George Follmer
Formula One World Championship career
First entry1973 South African Grand Prix
Races entered112
Constructors'
Championships
0
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories1
Pole positions3
Fastest laps2
Final entry1980 French Grand Prix
Shadow MKI-1
A Shadow Mk.I Can-Am car

History

1968–1972: Early years in CanAm series

The company was founded by Don Nichols in California[5] in 1968 as Advanced Vehicle Systems; the cars were called Shadows, designed by Trevor Harris and entered under the Shadow Racing Inc. banner. The first Shadows, the Mk.Is, were entered in the CanAm series with George Follmer and Vic Elford driving them. The Mk.1 featured an innovative design, using very small wheels for low drag and, although the car was quick, it was not the most reliable car in the field

The team became more competitive the following year, replacing the Harris car with a Peter Bryant design owing some elements to his Ti22 "titanium car" with Jackie Oliver also arriving from this effort and finishing eighth in the CanAm championship. The team also found some financial backing from Universal Oil Products (UOP).

Shadow came to dominate the shortened 1974 series, although by this point they were competing largely against privateers, the works McLaren and Porsche efforts having left the series.

1973–1974: Entry into Formula One

Shadow DN1 (Hill) 2008 Goodwood
The Embassy Hill Shadow DN1 from 1973 being demonstrated at the 2008 Goodwood Festival of Speed

Towards the end of 1972, Nichols announced that he was entering his team into Formula One with UOP sponsored cars designed by Tony Southgate, who had designed the BRM that gave Jean-Pierre Beltoise victory at the Monaco Grand Prix the previous year.

The team debuted in Formula One at the 1973 South African Grand Prix with the Shadow DN1 chassis. Two cars were available for drivers Oliver and Follmer, as well as a private entry for Graham Hill who ran his car under the Embassy Hill banner.

For 1974, the team hired two of the most promising drivers of the time: American Peter Revson and Frenchman Jean-Pierre Jarier. During a practice run for the South African Grand Prix, Revson was killed by a suspension failure on his DN3. He was replaced by Tom Pryce.

1975–1977: Peak of success

DN7matra
Matra-powered DN7 driven by Jean-Pierre Jarier as a one-off during the 1975 Austrian Grand Prix
Shadow DN9
The DN9 was copied by Arrows before a court order banned Arrows from racing their version, the FA/1

The new DN5 driven by Jarier gained pole position in the two first Grands Prix of the 1975 season but suffered mechanical failure in both races. The DN5 and most other Shadow Formula One cars used Ford Cosworth DFV engines, which produced around 490 bhp. However, later in 1975 another car was driven by Jarier, the DN7, and was fitted with a Matra V12 engine producing around 550 bhp. The wheelbase was substantially lengthened to accommodate the much larger and more expensive French powerplant, although due to budgetary issues, the Matra-powered DN7 was doomed as a one-off. Jarier's new teammate, Pryce, won the non-championship Race of Champions that same year. Pryce died in an accident involving a marshal at the 1977 South African Grand Prix. The marshal, Frederick Jansen Van Vuuren, had been running across the track to put out a small fire on the other Shadow car, and his injuries were so severe it took a marshal's meeting to determine who Pryce had hit. Pryce had no time to react to avoid the collision because he was unsighted behind a March car in front of him, and when his car finally came to a stop Jacques Laffite had been wrecked out of the race by Pryce's car.

The team replaced Pryce with Alan Jones, who won the team's only Grand Prix at the Austrian Grand Prix the same year.

1978–1980: Decline

After the 1977 season Shadow entered into a sharp decline. Jones left to join Williams for 1978. In the same period a majority of their staff and their sponsor Franco Ambrosio left to form their own team, Arrows, taking the young Riccardo Patrese. Despite sponsorship from Villiger tobacco and the signing of experienced drivers Clay Regazzoni and Hans Stuck for the 1978 season, results were poor. In 1980 they were absorbed into Theodore Racing, but Shadow's first ground effect chassis was largely uncompetitive, only once qualifying a car in seven races. Sponsorship dried up and after the seventh of the year's 14 races Teddy Yip wound up the Shadow team.

Complete Formula One results

Works team entries

(key) (Results in bold indicate pole position; results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Name Chassis Engines Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Points WCC
1973 United States UOP Shadow Racing Team DN1 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR NED GER AUT ITA CAN USA 9 8th
United Kingdom Jackie Oliver Ret Ret Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret 8 Ret 11 3 15
United States George Follmer 6 3 Ret DNS 14 Ret Ret 10 Ret Ret 10 17 14
United Kingdom Brian Redman DSQ
1974 United States UOP Shadow Racing Team DN1
DN3
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA 7 8th
United States Peter Revson Ret Ret DNP
United Kingdom Brian Redman 7 18 Ret
Sweden Bertil Roos Ret
United Kingdom Tom Pryce Ret Ret 8 6 Ret 10 Ret NC
France Jean-Pierre Jarier Ret Ret DNP NC 13 3 5 Ret 12 Ret 8 8 Ret Ret 10
1975 United States UOP Shadow Racing Team DN3
DN5
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA ESP MON BEL SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA USA 9.5 6th
United Kingdom Tom Pryce 12 Ret 9 Ret Ret 6 Ret 6 Ret Ret 4 3 6 NC
France Jean-Pierre Jarier DNS Ret Ret 4 Ret Ret Ret Ret 8 14 Ret Ret
DN7 Matra MS73 3.0 V12 Ret Ret 0 NC
1976 United Kingdom Shadow Racing Team DN5
DN5B
DN8
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN 10 8th
United Kingdom Tom Pryce 3 7 Ret 8 10 7 9 8 4 8 Ret 4 8 11 Ret Ret
France Jean-Pierre Jarier Ret Ret 7 Ret 9 8 12 12 9 11 Ret 10 19 18 10 10
1977 United Kingdom Shadow Racing Team DN5B
DN8
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN JPN 23 7th
United Kingdom Tom Pryce NC Ret Ret
Italy Riccardo Patrese 9 Ret Ret Ret 10 13 Ret 10 6
United Kingdom Jackie Oliver 9
Italy Arturo Merzario Ret
France Jean-Pierre Jarier 9
Italy Renzo Zorzi Ret 6 Ret Ret Ret
Australia Alan Jones Ret Ret 6 5 17 Ret 7 Ret 1 Ret 3 Ret 4 4
1978 United Kingdom Shadow Racing Team DN8
DN9
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN 6 11th
Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck 17 Ret DNQ DNS Ret Ret Ret 11 11 5 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni 15 5 DNQ 10 DNQ Ret 15 5 Ret Ret DNQ NC DNQ NC 14 DNQ
1979 United Kingdom Samson Shadow Racing Team
United Kingdom Interscope Shadow Racing Team
DN9 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA 3 10th
Netherlands Jan Lammers Ret 14 Ret Ret 12 10 DNQ 18 11 10 Ret Ret DNQ 9 DNQ
Italy Elio de Angelis 7 12 Ret 7 Ret Ret DNQ 16 12 11 Ret Ret Ret Ret 4
1980 United Kingdom Theodore Shadow
United Kingdom Shadow Cars
DN11
DN12
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW BEL MON FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA 0 NC
Sweden Stefan Johansson DNQ DNQ
United Kingdom Geoff Lees 13 DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
Republic of Ireland David Kennedy DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ

Results of other Shadow cars

(key) (Results in bold indicate pole position; results in italics indicate fastest lap.)

Year Entrant(s) Chassis Engine Tyres Driver(s) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1973 ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR NED GER AUT ITA CAN USA
United Kingdom Embassy Racing Shadow DN1 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G United Kingdom Graham Hill Ret 9 Ret Ret 10 Ret NC 13 Ret 14 16 13
1976 BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN
United Kingdom Team P R Reilly Shadow DN3 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G United Kingdom Mike Wilds DNQ
1978 ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN
United States Interscope Racing Shadow DN9 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G United States Danny Ongais DNPQ DNPQ

References

  1. ^ "Case History". Corktree.tripod.com. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  2. ^ "1973 United States Grand Prix Entry list".
  3. ^ "1978 United States Grand Prix Entry list".
  4. ^ "1977 Austrian Grand Prix Entry list".
  5. ^ "CanAm Specials: AVS Shadow". grandprixhistory.com. Retrieved 23 June 2018.
1976 Brazilian Grand Prix

The 1976 Brazilian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Interlagos in São Paulo, Brazil on 25 January 1976. It was the opening round of the 1976 Formula One season. The race was the fifth Brazilian Grand Prix and the fourth to be held for the World Drivers' Championship. The race was held over 40 laps of the 7.87-kilometre circuit for a total race distance of 315 kilometres.

The race was won by defending world champion, Niki Lauda, driving a Ferrari 312T. The Austrian driver won his eighth Formula One Grand Prix by 28 seconds over French driver Patrick Depailler in a Tyrrell 007. Second place was Depailler's best finish in almost two years having finished second previously at the 1974 Swedish Grand Prix. Tom Pryce finished third in a Shadow DN5B in his second podium in six months. It would prove to be the season highlight for Pryce and for Shadow Racing Cars. It was their only podium for the season and Pryce would not stand on the podium again.

1980 French Grand Prix

The 1980 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Paul Ricard on 29 June 1980. It was the seventh round of the 1980 Formula One season. The race was the 58th French Grand Prix, or the 66th Grand Prix de l'ACF and the sixth to be held at Paul Ricard. The race was held over 54 laps of the 5.809-kilometre circuit for a total race distance of 314 kilometres.

2017 in motorsport

The following is an overview of the events of 2017 in motorsport, including the major racing events, motorsport venues that were opened and closed during a year, championships and non-championship events that were established and disestablished in a year, births and deaths of racing drivers and other motorsport people.

Alan Jones (racing driver)

Alan Stanley Jones, (born 2 November 1946 in Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian former Formula One driver. He was the first driver to win a Formula One World Championship with the Williams team, becoming the 1980 World Drivers' Champion and the second Australian to do so following triple World Champion Sir Jack Brabham. He competed in a total of 117 Grands Prix, winning 12 and achieving 24 podium finishes. In 1978 Jones won the Can-Am championship driving a Lola.

Jones is also the last Australian driver to win the Australian Grand Prix, winning the 1980 event at Calder Park Raceway, having lapped the field consisting mostly of Formula 5000 cars while he was driving his Formula One Championship winning Williams FW07B.

Alan Rees (racing driver)

Alan Rees (born 12 January 1938 in Langstone, Newport, Monmouthshire) is a British former racing driver from Wales. He participated in three World Championship Grands Prix in the 1960s, although two of those appearances were driving Formula 2 cars. He scored no championship points. His best result was seventh place (second in the Formula Two class) in the 1967 German Grand Prix.Rees drove for the works Lotus Formula Junior team in 1962, and won three races before a crash at the Nürburgring 1000 km sports car race ended his season. From 1963 to 1968, he drove for the Roy Winklemann Racing team in Formula Two and frequently achieved victories over experienced drivers such as Jackie Stewart and Jochen Rindt.

Brian Redman

Brian Herman Thomas Redman (born 9 March 1937 in Colne, Lancashire and educated at Rossall School, Fleetwood, Lancashire), is a retired British racing driver.

He was very successful in sportscar racing and the World Sportscar Championship, winning the 1970 Targa Florio with a Porsche 908 and the 12 Hours of Sebring twice, in 1975 with a BMW Coupé, in 1978 with a Porsche 935 and the Spa-Francorchamps 1000km race 4 times (1968–1970, 1972). He was for many years associated with the Chevron marque, founded by fellow-Lancastrian Derek Bennett.

He is currently a regular at the Monterey Historic Automobile Races at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca.

Can-Am

The Canadian-American Challenge Cup, or Can-Am, was an SCCA/CASC sports car racing series from 1966 to 1987.

Colne

Colne () is a town and civil parish in Lancashire, England, six miles north-east of Burnley, 25 miles east of Preston, 25 miles north of Manchester and 30 miles west of Leeds. It is a market town and the cross allowing a market to be held there dates to the 15th century. The cross was originally at the junction of Colne Lane and Church Street. It was first moved to the grounds of The Gables on Albert Road, the location of Colne Library until around 1970. It has now been relocated to outside the Market Hall on Market Street, part of the main road through the town centre.

The town should not be confused with the unrelated Colne Valley around the River Colne near Huddersfield in West Yorkshire.

Colne is close to the southern entrance to the Aire Gap, the lowest crossing of the Pennine watershed. The M65 terminates west of the town and from here two main roads take traffic onwards towards the Yorkshire towns of Skipton (A56) and Keighley (A6068). Colne railway station is the terminus of the East Lancashire railway line.

Colne adjoins the Pendle parishes of Foulridge, Laneshaw Bridge, Trawden Forest, Nelson, Barrowford and Blacko.

Jean-Pierre Jarier

Jean-Pierre Jacques Jarier (born 10 July 1946) is a French former Grand Prix racing driver. He drove for several notable Formula One teams including Shadow, Team Lotus, Ligier and Tyrrell Racing. His best finish was third (three times) and he also took three pole positions.

Shadow DN1

The Shadow DN1 was a Formula One car used by the Shadow team during the 1973 Formula One season and the early stages of the following season. The car was the first Formula One car for Shadow, which had previously participated in the CanAm Sportscar Series. It was designed by former BRM engineer Tony Southgate. The DN1 was also driven by Graham Hill for his privateer team, Embassy Hill.

Shadow DN3

The Shadow DN3 was a Formula One car used by the Shadow team during the 1974 Formula One season. It also appeared twice during the early stages of the 1975 Formula One season in an updated DN3B form. Designed by former BRM engineer Tony Southgate, the best finish achieved in a DN3 was Jean-Pierre Jarier's third place at the Monaco Grand Prix.

Shadow DN5

The Shadow DN5 was a Formula One car used by the Shadow team during the 1975 Formula One season. Updated to a 'B' specification, it was used through the 1976 Formula One season and for the first two races of the following season. It was qualified on pole position three times, and twice achieved a fastest lap in a race. Its best finish in a race was third (twice), both times driven by Tom Pryce.

Shadow DN7

The Shadow DN7 was a Formula One car used by the Shadow team in two races late in the 1975 Formula One season. Driven by Jean-Pierre Jarier, it never finished a race.

Shadow DN8

The Shadow DN8 was a Formula One car used by the Shadow team during the 1976, 1977 and 1978 Formula One seasons. Driven by Alan Jones, it won the 1977 Austrian Grand Prix, Shadow's only Grand Prix victory.

Shadow DN9

The Shadow DN9 was a Formula One car used by the Shadow team during the 1978 and 1979 Formula One seasons. It is most famous for having been copied by the new Arrows team for their FA1. Arrows, formed by a disgruntled group of Shadows' staffers, were in the end prohibited from using the design.

Sport in Wales

Sport in Wales plays a prominent role in Welsh culture. The most popular sports in Wales are association football and rugby union. Like the other countries of the United Kingdom, Wales enjoys independent representation in major world sporting events such as the FIFA World Cup and in the Rugby World Cup, but competes as the England and Wales cricket team and as Great Britain in some other competitions, including the Olympics.

The Millennium Stadium is the largest stadium in Wales. Located in Cardiff, it is the home of the Wales national rugby union team with a capacity of 74,505. It was the temporary location for English football and rugby league finals during the redevelopment of Wembley Stadium.

The Cardiff City Stadium is currently the home of the Wales national football team.

Sport Wales is responsible for sport in Wales.

In 2008/09, Cardiff had the highest percentage (61%) of residents who regularly participated in sport and active recreation out of all 22 local authorities in Wales, whereas Rhondda Cynon Taf had the lowest (24%).

Tony Southgate

Tony Southgate (born 25 May 1940, Coventry, England) is a British engineer and former racing car designer. He designed many successful cars, including Jaguar's Le Mans-winning XJR-9, and cars for almost every type of circuit racing. He was responsible for the chassis design of Ford's RS200 Group B rally car. Southgate was employed as chief designer or technical director for many Formula One teams for over twenty years. These teams included BRM, Shadow and Arrows. Southgate retired after producing the Audi R8C, which was a major influence in the Bentley Speed 8, which won Le Mans in 2003. He continues to be a regular visitor to current and historic race meetings.

Southgate is the only chief engineer to have won the Triple Crown of Motorsport with his cars: Indianapolis 500 with Eagle TG2 in 1968, the Monaco Grand Prix with the BRM P160B and the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1988 and 1990 with Jaguar XJR-9 and Jaguar XJR-12.

UOP LLC

Honeywell UOP, formerly known as UOP LLC or Universal Oil Products, is a multi-national company developing and delivering technology to the petroleum refining, gas processing, petrochemical production, and major manufacturing industries.

The company's roots date back to 1914, when the revolutionary Dubbs thermal cracking process created the technological foundation for today's modern refining industry. In the ensuing decades, UOP engineers generated thousands of patents, leading to important advances in process technology, profitability consultation, and equipment design.

United States Shadow Racing Cars United Kingdom
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