Sex in film

Sex in film is the presence in a film of a presentation of sexuality. Since the development of the medium, the presence in films of any form of sexuality has been controversial. Some films containing sex scenes have been criticized by religious groups or have been banned or the subject of censorship by governments, or both. In countries with a film rating system, films containing sex scenes typically receive a restricted classification. Nudity in film may be regarded as sexual or as non-sexual.

An erotic film is usually a film that has an erotic quality that causes the creation of sexual feelings,[1] as well as a philosophical contemplation concerning the aesthetics of sexual desire, sensuality and romantic love.

Love scenes, erotic or not, have been present in films since the silent era of cinematography. A pornographic film, on the other hand, is a sex film which does not usually claim any artistic merit. Sex scenes have been presented in many genres of film, although there are some in which it is rare. Many actors and actresses have performed nude/partial nude scenes, as well as dress and behave in ways considered sexually provocative by contemporary standards at some point in their careers.

The Kiss (1896) contained what was regarded as the very first sex scene on film, drawing the general outrage of movie goers, civic leaders, and religious leaders, as utterly shocking, obscene and completely immoral.

Terminology

Sex in film can be distinguished from a sex film, which usually refers to a pornographic film and sometimes to a sex education film. It should also be distinguished from nudity in film, though nudity can be presented in a sexualized context. For example, nudity in the context of naturism would normally be regarded as non-sexual. Some people distinguish between "gratuitous sex" and sex scenes which are presented as integral to a film's plot or as part of the character development.

Sex scenes are the main feature of pornographic films. In softcore films, sexuality is less explicit. Erotic films are suggestive of sexuality, but need not contain nudity.

Production

Since the 2010s, film and TV productions increasingly employ intimacy coordinators to ensure the wellbeing of actors who participate in sex scenes, and to help prevent harassment and violations of consent.[2]

Europe

Pedro Almodóvar of Spain is a prolific director who has included eroticism in many of his movies. Tinto Brass of Italy has dedicated his career to bringing explicit sexuality into mainstream cinema. His films are also notable for feminist-friendly eroticism. French filmmaker Catherine Breillat caused controversy with unsimulated sex in her films Romance (1999) and Anatomy of Hell (2004). In Italy, nudity and strong sexual themes go back to the silent era with films such as The Last Days of Pompeii (1926). Lars von Trier of Denmark has included explicit/unsimulated sex scenes in some of his films, such as Breaking the Waves (1996), The Idiots (1998), Manderlay (2005), Antichrist (2009), and Nymphomaniac (2013). He is also a co-founder of film company Puzzy Power, a subsidiary of his Zentropa, with the goal of producing hardcore pornographic films for women. Blue is the Warmest Colour (2013) sparked an international firestorm over its frank depiction of sexuality between two young women, yet managed to win the Palme d'Or, the highest prize awarded at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival in May 2013. Love (2015) contains many explicit unsimulated sex scenes.

United States

Lorna Poster
Lorna (1964) was the first of Russ Meyer's films where the main female part, played in this film by Lorna Maitland, was selected on the basis of her large breast size

The inclusion in film of any form of sexuality has been controversial since the development of the medium. Kissing in films, for example, was initially considered by some to be scandalous. The Kiss (1896) contained a kiss, which was regarded as a sex scene and drew general outrage from movie goers, civic leaders, and religious leaders, as utterly shocking, obscene and completely immoral. One contemporary critic wrote, "The spectacle of the prolonged pasturing on each other's lips was beastly enough in life size on the stage but magnified to gargantuan proportions and repeated three times over it is absolutely disgusting."[3] The Catholic Church called for censorship and moral reform - because kissing in public at the time could lead to prosecution.[4] Perhaps in defiance of the righteous indignation and "to spice up a film", the film was followed by many kiss imitators, including The Kiss in the Tunnel (1899) and The Kiss (1900). Other producers would take the criticism on board, or in mock of the standard, and use an implicit kiss, which would be obstructed from view just as the lips would touch, such as shielding a possible kiss by placing say a hat in front of the actors' faces, or fading to grey just as a kiss is to take place, etc.

The display of cleavage created controversy. For example, producer Howard Hughes displayed Jane Russell's cleavage in The Outlaw (1943) and in The French Line (1953), which was found objectionable under the Hays Code because of Russell's "breast shots in bathtub, cleavage and breast exposure" while some of her decollete gowns were regarded to be "intentionally designed to give a bosom peep-show effect beyond even extreme decolletage".[5] Both films were condemned by the National Legion of Decency and were released only in cut versions.

The selection of actresses for a role on the basis of their breast size is controversial and has been described as contributing to breast fetishism,[6] but has proved to be a draw card. Producers such as Russ Meyer produced films which featured actresses with large breasts. Lorna (1964) was the first of his films where the main female part, played by Lorna Maitland, was selected on the basis of breast size. The producers and exhibitors of the film were prosecuted for obscenity in several US states. Other large breasted actresses used by Meyer include Kitten Natividad, Erica Gavin, Tura Satana, and Uschi Digard among many others. The majority of them were naturally large breasted and he occasionally cast women in their first trimesters of pregnancy to enhance their breast size even further.[7] Author and director William Rotsler said: "with Lorna Meyer established the formula that made him rich and famous, the formula of people filmed at top hate, top lust, top heavy."[8]

Blue Movie (1969), directed by Andy Warhol,[9][10][11] was the first adult erotic film depicting explicit sex to receive wide theatrical release in the United States.[9][10][11] Blue Movie is a seminal film in the Golden Age of Porn and, according to Warhol, a major influence in the making of Last Tango in Paris (1972), an internationally controversial erotic drama film.[11] Another explicit adult film of that period was Mona the Virgin Nymph (1970) that contained a number of unsimulated non-penetrative sex scenes. Unlike Blue Movie, however, Mona had a plot.[12] To forestall legal problems, the film was screened without credits. The producer of Mona, Bill Osco, went on to produce other adult films,[13] such as Flesh Gordon (1974), Harlot (1971), and Alice in Wonderland (1976).

Boys in the Sand (1971)[14] was an American gay pornographic film,[15] the first gay porn film to include credits, to achieve crossover success, to be reviewed by Variety,[16] and one of the earliest porn films, after Blue Movie[9][10][17][18] to gain mainstream credibility, preceding Deep Throat (1972).

By genre

In North America, erotic films may be primarily character driven or plot driven, with considerable overlap. Most dramas center around character development, such as Steven Shainberg's Secretary (2002). Comedy films, especially romantic comedies and romantic dramas, tend toward character interaction.

Mystery films, thrillers, drama and horror films tend toward strong plots and premises, such as Last Tango in Paris (1972), Dressed to Kill (1980), Body Heat (1981), Nine 1/2 Weeks (1986), Angel Heart (1987), Basic Instinct (1992), Single White Female (1992), Color of Night (1994), Showgirls (1995), Leaving Las Vegas (1995), Different Strokes (1997), Wild Things (1998), Eyes Wide Shut (1999) and In the Cut (2003).[19] Others, like About Last Night... (1986), Monster's Ball (2001), Chloe (2009), Love & Other Drugs (2010), Blue Valentine (2010), Shame (2011), Compliance (2012) and The Sessions (2012) combine both strong plots and characters.[19][20]

Thrillers

Erotic thrillers are a popular American erotic subgenre, with films such as Dressed to Kill (1980), Angel Heart (1987), Basic Instinct (1992), Single White Female (1992), Color of Night (1994), The Maddening (1995), Wild Things (1998), Eyes Wide Shut (1999), In the Cut (2003), Chloe (2009), Compliance (2012), and The Boy Next Door (2015).[19] In some films, the development of a sexual relationship (or even a one-night stand) is often used to create tension in the storyline, especially if the people involved should not be sleeping together, such as in Out of Sight (1998), where a U.S. Marshal has sex with the criminal she is pursuing.

Horror

In horror films, sex is often used to mark characters that are doomed to die. Characters that engage in sex acts are often the first to be claimed by the antagonist(s), or will die shortly after their sex scene or (sometimes) in the middle of it. This convention of it being bad luck to have sex in a horror film is notably illustrated in the Friday the 13th film series, where supernatural villain Jason Voorhees takes a special dislike to teenagers and young adults having sex because, as a young boy, he drowned in a lake while the camp counselors who should have been supervising him were having sex.

In some interpretations of this "rule", the sex acts themselves directly cause the character's demise. In Cabin Fever, a man catches the deadly illness because a woman who was infected (but not yet symptomatic) seduces and has impulsive sex with him. They don't use a condom because the careless woman believes she is healthy. Ironically, the woman (and the audience) only realize that she is infected because of red welts that are brought out by their rough lovemaking. Species (1995) and its sequels also feature many sexual deaths as virtually every human who mates with an alien in the franchise subsequently dies - female aliens kill human suitors regardless of whether they have poor genes, resist the alien's advances, or mate successfully. Human women who mate with alien men die shortly after sex as their abdomens burst during the unnaturally rapid pregnancy that always follows.

Most times in horror movies the typical survivor is a young girl who is still a virgin. In the film Scream, which satirizes horror movies, this rule is somewhat broken as the character Randy Meeks points out that one of the rules of horrors is to not have sex. In an intersecting scene, the film's main protagonist Sidney Prescott loses her virginity to Billy Loomis. After they finish, Billy is stabbed by Ghostface and Sidney is then chased. Randy himself survives a gunshot wound at the end of the film because, as he explains, he is a virgin. However, he dies in the sequel, Scream 2, after which it is revealed that he lost his virginity sometime prior to his death.

Mexican

In Mexico, many comedy films are based on sex, typically portraying men as unstoppable sex-seeking creatures and women as willing targets. Although the number of such comedies waned during the 1990s, domestic servants, bar workers, dancers and neighbors' wives continue to be depicted as potentially willing sexual partners. The films La Tarea (1991), Miracle Alley (1995) and Y Tu Mamá También (2001) are some of the most important examples of this.

India

The entertainment industry is an important part of modern India, and is expressive of Indian society in general. Historically, Indian television and film has lacked the frank depiction of sex. Kissing scenes, for example, were banned by Indian film censors until the 1990s.[21] Since then the entertainment industry has liberalized but the taboo against them continues well into the 2010s, with many of Bollywood stars refusing to do them, and controversy and debate sparked when actors choose to do them.[22] On the other hand, rape scenes or scenes showing sexual assault were common until approximately the early 2000s.[23] Mainstream films are still largely catered for the masses of India, however, art films and foreign films containing sexuality are watched by Indians. Because of the same process of glamorization of film entertainment that occurs in Hollywood, Indian cinema, mainly the Hindi-speaking Bollywood industry, is also beginning to add sexual overtones.[24]

Television

Many drama series, and daytime soap operas are based around sex. This commonly revolves around the development of personal relationships of the main characters, with a view of creating sexual tension in the series.

Partial nudity was considered acceptable on daytime television in the 1970s but disappeared after 2000, partly due to more conservative morals,[25] and also to the prevalence of cable and satellite subscriptions. Only PBS occasionally features nudity.

In 2008 and 2009, the French TV channel Canal+ featured a series titled X Femmes (English: X Women), which consisted of ten short films shot by female directors with the goal of producing erotica from a female point of view.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Eroticism". Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 7 August 2011.
  2. ^ Martinelli, Marissa (29 October 2018). "HBO Will Use "Intimacy Coordinators" for All of Its Sex Scenes". Slate Magazine. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  3. ^ The Chap-book, Volume 5, Number 5, July 15, 1896
  4. ^ Sex in Cinema: Pre-1920s
  5. ^ Doherty, Thomas & Doherty, Thomas Patrick (2007). Hollywood's censor: Joseph I. Breen & the Production Code Administration. Columbia University Press. p. 310. ISBN 0-231-14358-3.
  6. ^ Latteier 1998, p. 117
  7. ^ Meyer, Russ (2000). A Clean Breast: The Life and Loves of Russ Meyer (3 volume set). (Under the pseudonym "Adolph Albion Schwartz"). El Rio, TX: Hauck Pub Co. ISBN 0-9621797-2-8.
  8. ^ McDonough, Jimmy (2005). Big bosoms and square jaws : the biography of Russ Meyer, king of the sex film. London: Jonathan Cape. ISBN 0-224-07250-1., p.138
  9. ^ a b c Canby, Vincent (July 22, 1969). "Movie Review - Blue Movie (1968) Screen: Andy Warhol's 'Blue Movie'". New York Times. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  10. ^ a b c Canby, Vincent (August 10, 1969). "Warhol's Red Hot and 'Blue' Movie. D1. Print. (behind paywall)". New York Times. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  11. ^ a b c Comenas, Gary (2005). "Blue Movie (1968)". WarholStars.org. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  12. ^ "Pornography". Pornography Girl. Archived from the original on May 6, 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013. The first explicitly pornographic film with a plot that received a general theatrical release in the U.S. is generally considered to be Mona (Mona the Virgin Nymph)...
  13. ^ "Flesh Gordon Interview 3". PicPal.com. Archived from the original on August 28, 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  14. ^ Powell, Mimi; Scott Dagostino; Bhisham Kinha. "The Porn Power List". FAB magazine. Archived from the original on February 22, 2008. Retrieved March 6, 2008.
  15. ^ "40 Years of Gay History: the Early Seventies". Advocate.com. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007. Retrieved November 5, 2007.
  16. ^ Jeffrey Escoffier, "Beefcake to Hardcore: Gay Pornography and the Sexual Revolution," in Sex Scene. Media and the Sexual Revolution, ed. Eric Schaefer, Duke University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780822356424, pp. 319-347, at p. 319.
  17. ^ Comenas, Gary (1969). "July 21, 1969: Andy Warhol's Blue Movie Opens". WarholStars.org. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  18. ^ Haggerty, George E. (2015). A Companion to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies. John Wiley & Sons. p. 339. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  19. ^ a b c Lundin, Leigh (2010-07-25). "Erotic Mystery Thrillers". Sex-n-violence. Criminal Brief.
  20. ^ Ebert, Roger (March 24, 2010). "Chloe". Rogerebert.com.
  21. ^ Ray, Arnab (February 25, 2013). "On Kissing, Bollywood and Rebellion". The New York Times.
  22. ^ Singh, Prashant (August 25, 2014). "What’s the big deal about a kiss, asks Bollywood". Hindustan Times.
  23. ^ Dias, Muditha (May 15, 2013). "Bollywood's culture of rape". ABC
  24. ^ "Indians mature enough to handle sex in films: Konkona Sen". The Indian Express. December 3, 2010.
  25. ^ Siegel, Tatiana (2006-04-03). "Erotic thrillers lose steam on big screen". The Hollywood Reporter. Hollywood. Archived from the original on 2010-07-22.

Further reading

  • Andrews, David (2006) Soft in the Middle: the contemporary softcore feature in its contexts. Ohio State University Press, ISBN 9780814210222
  • Brusendorff, Ove & Henningsen, Poul (1960) Erotica for the Millions. Los Angeles: the Book Mart
  • Durgnat, Raymond (1966) Eros in the Cinema. London: Calder & Boyars
  • Jahraus, Oliver & Neuhaus, Stefan (2003) Der erotische Film: Zur medialen Codierung von Ästhetik, Sexualität und Gewalt. Königshausen & Neumann, ISBN 3826025822
  • Keesey, Douglas; Duncan, Paul (ed.) (2005) Erotic Cinema. Cologne: Taschen ISBN 3-8228-2546-8
  • Kyrou, Ado (1957) Amour-Érotisme au Cinéma. Le Terrain Vague
  • --do.-- (1963) Le Surréalisme au Cinéma. Le Terrain Vague
  • Lo Duca (1958, 1960, 1962) L'Érotisme au Cinéma. 3 vols. Paris: Pauvert
  • McDonagh, Maitland (1996) The Fifty Most Erotic Films of All Time: from "Pandora's Box" to "Basic Instinct". New York: Carol Publishing Group ISBN 0-8065-1697-6
  • Tohill, Cathal & Tombs, Pete (1994) Immoral Tales: sex and horror cinema in Europe, 1956-1984. London: Primitive Press ISBN 0-9524141-0-4
  • Tyler, Parker (1969) Sex Psyche Etcetera in the Film. Horizon Books
    • --do.--(1971) --do.-- (Pelican Book A1302.) Harmondsworth: Penguin Books ISBN 0-14-021302-3
  • Walker, Alexander (1966) The Celluloid Sacrifice. London: Michael Joseph
    • --do.--(1968) Sex in the Movies: the celluloid sacrifice. (Pelican Book A989.) Harmondsworth: Penguin Books
  • Williams, Linda (2005) The Erotic Thriller in Contemporary Cinema. Edinburgh University Press, ISBN 9780748611485

External links

9½ Weeks

​9 1⁄2 Weeks is a 1986 American erotic romantic drama film directed by Adrian Lyne with a screenplay by Sarah Kernochan, Zalman King and Patricia Louisianna Knop. The film is based on the 1978 memoir of the same name by Austrian-American author Ingeborg Day. It stars Kim Basinger as Elizabeth McGraw and Mickey Rourke as John Gray. McGraw is a New York City art gallery employee who has a brief yet intense affair with a mysterious Wall Street broker. The film was completed in 1984, but not released until February 1986.

Considered too explicit by its American distributor, and cut for U.S. release, the film was a box office bomb in the U.S., grossing only $6.7 million at the box office on a $17 million budget. It also received mixed reviews at the time of its release. However, it became a huge success internationally in its unedited version, particularly in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom, making $100 million worldwide. It has also acquired a large fanbase on video and DVD and has developed a cult following.

Blue Movie

Blue Movie (stylized as blue movie; also known as Fuck) is a 1969 American film written, produced, and directed by Andy Warhol. Blue Movie, the first adult erotic film depicting explicit sex to receive wide theatrical release in the United States, is a seminal film in the Golden Age of Porn (1969–1984) and helped inaugurate the "porno chic" phenomenon in modern American culture, and later, in many other countries throughout the world. According to Warhol, Blue Movie was a major influence in the making of Last Tango in Paris, an internationally controversial erotic drama film, starring Marlon Brando, and released a few years after Blue Movie was made. Viva and Louis Waldon, playing themselves, starred in Blue Movie.In 1970, Mona, the second adult erotic film, after Blue Movie, depicting explicit sex that received a wide theatrical release in the United States, was shown. Later, other adult films, such as Boys in the Sand, Deep Throat, Behind the Green Door and The Devil in Miss Jones were released, continuing the Golden Age of Porn begun with Blue Movie. In 1973, the phenomenon of porn being publicly discussed by celebrities (like Johnny Carson and Bob Hope) and taken seriously by film critics (like Roger Ebert) began, for the first time, in modern American culture. In 1976, The Opening of Misty Beethoven, based on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw (and its derivative, My Fair Lady), and directed by Radley Metzger, was released theatrically and is considered, by award-winning author Toni Bentley, the "crown jewel" of the Golden Age of Porn.Blue Movie was publicly screened in New York City in 2005, for the first time in more than 30 years. Also in New York City, but more recently, in 2016, the film was shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan.

Dominique Swain

Dominique Swain (born August 12, 1980) is an American actress and producer. She is best known for her roles as the title character in the 1997 film adaptation of Lolita, and as Sean Archer's daughter, Jamie, in the action-thriller Face/Off (1997). She worked predominantly in independent films throughout the late 90s and early 2000s. Her other credits include Girl (1998), Happy Campers (2001), Tart (2001), Pumpkin (2002), and Alpha Dog (2006). She has since starred in a succession of horror films. In 2002, she appeared in the music video for the Moby song "We Are All Made of Stars".

Ed Wood

Edward Davis Wood Jr. (October 10, 1924 – December 10, 1978) was an American filmmaker, actor, and author.

In the 1950s, Wood directed several low-budget science fiction, crime and horror films, notably Glen or Glenda (1953), Jail Bait (1954), Bride of the Monster (1955), Plan 9 from Outer Space (1959), Night of the Ghouls (1959) and The Sinister Urge (1960). In the 1960s and 1970s, he transitioned towards sexploitation and pornographic films, and wrote over eighty pulp crime, horror and sex novels. Notable for their campy aesthetics, technical errors, unsophisticated special effects, ill-fitting stock footage, eccentric casts, idiosyncratic stories and non sequitur dialogue, Wood's films remained largely obscure until he was awarded a Golden Turkey Award for Worst Director of All Time in 1980, renewing public interest in his life and work.Following the publication of Rudolph Grey's 1992 oral biography Nightmare of Ecstasy: The Life and Art of Edward D. Wood Jr., a biopic of his life, Ed Wood (1994), was directed by Tim Burton. Starring Johnny Depp as Wood, the film received two Academy Awards.

Erotic art

Erotic art covers any artistic work that is intended to evoke erotic arousal or that depicts scenes of sexual activity. It is a type of erotica and includes drawings, engravings, films, paintings, photographs, and sculptures, and writing.

Fifty Shades of Grey (film)

Fifty Shades of Grey is a 2015 American erotic romantic drama film directed by Sam Taylor-Johnson, with a screenplay by Kelly Marcel. The film is based on E. L. James’ 2011 novel of the same name and stars Dakota Johnson as Anastasia Steele, a college graduate who begins a sadomasochistic relationship with young business magnate Christian Grey, played by Jamie Dornan.

The film premiered at the 65th Berlin International Film Festival on February 11, 2015 and was released on February 13, 2015, by Universal Pictures and Focus Features. Despite receiving generally negative reviews, it was an immediate box office success, breaking numerous box office records and earning over US$571 million worldwide.

The film was the most awarded at the 36th Golden Raspberry Awards, winning five of six nominations, including Worst Picture (tied with Fantastic Four) and both leading roles. In contrast, Ellie Goulding's single "Love Me like You Do" was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, while The Weeknd's single "Earned It" was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song.

It is the first film in the Fifty Shades film trilogy and was followed by two sequels, Fifty Shades Darker and Fifty Shades Freed, released in 2017 and 2018 respectively.

Golden Age of Porn

The term "Golden Age of Porn", or "porno chic", refers to a 15-year period (around 1969–1984) in commercial American pornography, which spread internationally, in which sexually explicit films experienced positive attention from mainstream cinemas, movie critics, and the general public. It began with release of the 1969 film Blue Movie directed by Andy Warhol, and the 1970 film Mona produced by Bill Osco. These films were the first adult erotic films depicting explicit sex to receive wide theatrical release in the United States. Both influenced the making of films such as 1972's Deep Throat starring Linda Lovelace and directed by Gerard Damiano, Behind the Green Door starring Marilyn Chambers and directed by the Mitchell brothers, 1973's The Devil in Miss Jones also by Damiano, and 1976's The Opening of Misty Beethoven by Radley Metzger. According to Warhol, Blue Movie was a major influence in the making of Last Tango in Paris, an internationally controversial erotic drama film, starring Marlon Brando, and released a few years after Blue Movie was made.Following mentions by Johnny Carson on his popular Tonight Show and Bob Hope on TV as well, Deep Throat achieved major box-office success, despite being rudimentary by mainstream standards. In 1973, the more accomplished, but still low-budget, film The Devil in Miss Jones was the seventh most successful film of the year, and was well received by major media, including a favorable review by film critic Roger Ebert. The phenomenon of porn being publicly discussed by celebrities, and taken seriously by critics, a development referred to, by Ralph Blumenthal of The New York Times, as "porno chic", began for the first time in modern American culture. It became obvious that box-office returns of very low-budget adult erotic films could fund further advances in the technical and production values of porn, making it extremely competitive with Hollywood films. There was concern that, left unchecked, the vast profitability of such films would lead to Hollywood being influenced by pornography.Prior to this, thousands of U.S. state and municipal anti-obscenity laws and ordinances held that participating in the creation, distribution, or consumption of pornography, constituted criminal action. Multi-jurisdictional interpretations of obscenity made such films highly susceptible to prosecution and criminal liability for obscenity, thereby greatly restricting their distribution and profit potential. However, the US Supreme Court's 1973 decision in Miller v. California, narrowing and simplifying the definition of obscenity, resulted in dramatically fewer prosecutions nationwide. Freedom in creative license, higher movie budgets and payouts, and a "Hollywood mindset", all contributed to this period.

However, with the increasing availability of videocassette recorders for private viewing in the 1980s, video supplanted film as the preferred distribution medium for pornography, which quickly reverted to being low-budget and openly gratuitous, ending this "Golden Age".

Kerry Fox

Kerry Lauren Fox (born 30 July 1966) is a New Zealand actress. She came to prominence playing author Janet Frame in the movie An Angel at My Table directed by Jane Campion, which gained her a Best Actress Award from the New Zealand Film and Television Awards.

Maria Isabel Lopez

Maria Isabel Lopez (born 14 September 1958), is a Filipino movie and television actress.

Lopez was the Binibining Pilipinas Universe 1982 titleholder and represented the Philippines in the 31st Miss Universe Pageant in Lima, Peru. She became controversially known as a Filipina beauty queen acting on Sex in film. Lopez was previously married to a Japanese national, Hiroshi Yokohama, now separated. She enjoys mosaics and acting various roles in Philippine cinematography.

Mark Rylance

Sir David Mark Rylance Waters (born 18 January 1960) is an English actor, theatre director, and playwright. He was the first artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe in London, between 1995 and 2005. After training at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, Rylance made his professional debut at the Citizens Theatre, Glasgow in 1980. He appeared in the West End productions of Much Ado About Nothing in 1994 and Jerusalem in 2010, winning the Olivier Award for Best Actor for both. He has also appeared on Broadway, winning three Tony Awards: two for Best Actor for Boeing Boeing in 2008 and Jerusalem in 2011, and one for Best Featured Actor for Twelfth Night in 2014. He received Best Actor nominations for Richard III in 2014 and Farinelli and the King in 2017. He is one of only eight actors to have won the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play twice while his nominations for Richard III and Twelfth Night in 2014 makes him one of only six performers to be nominated in two acting categories in the same year.

Rylance's film appearances include Prospero's Books (1991), Angels and Insects (1995), Institute Benjamenta (1996), Intimacy (2001), The Other Boleyn Girl (2008) and Dunkirk (2017). He has garnered attention in the 21st century for his collaborations with director Steven Spielberg, winning the Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Rudolf Abel in Spielberg's Bridge of Spies (2015) and subsequently collaborating with the director to play the title role in The BFG (2016), a live-action film adaptation of the children's book by Roald Dahl, and James Halliday in Ready Player One (2018), based on the novel of the same name.

On television, Rylance won the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actor for his role as David Kelly in the 2005 Channel 4 drama The Government Inspector and for playing Thomas Cromwell in the 2015 BBC Two mini-series Wolf Hall. For Wolf Hall, he also received Emmy and Golden Globe Award nominations. Rylance is a patron of the London International Festival of Theatre. He is also a patron of the London-based charity Peace Direct, which supports peace-builders in areas of conflict, and of the British Stop the War Coalition. In 2016, he was named in the Time 100 list of the most influential people in the world.

Nudity in American television

Nudity in American television has always been a controversial topic. Aside from a few exceptions, nudity in the United States has traditionally not been shown on terrestrial television. On the other hand, cable television has been much less constrained as far as nudity is concerned.

Nudity in film

Nudity in film is the presentation in a film of at least one person who is nude, partially nude or wearing less clothing than contemporary norms in some societies consider "modest". Since the development of the medium, inclusion in films of any form of sexuality has been controversial, and in the case of most nude scenes has had to be justified as being part of the story, in the concept of "artistically justifiable nudity". In some cases nudity is itself the object of a film or is used in the development of the character of the subject. In some cases, nudity has been criticized as "superfluous" or "gratuitous" to the plot, and some film producers have been accused of including nudity in a film to appeal to certain audiences. Many actors and actresses have appeared nude, or exposing parts of their bodies or dressed in ways considered provocative by contemporary standards at some point in their careers.

Nudity in film should be distinguished from sex in film. Erotic films are suggestive of sexuality, and usually contain nudity, though that is not a prerequisite. Nudity in a sexual context is common in pornographic films, but softcore pornographic films generally avoid depiction of a penis or a vulva. A film on naturism or about people for whom nudity is common may contain non-sexual nudity, and some other non-pornographic films may contain very brief nude scenes. The vast majority of nudity in film is found in pornographic films.

Nude scenes can be controversial in some cultures because they may challenge some of the community's standards of modesty. These standards vary by culture, and depend on the type of nudity, who is exposed, which parts of the body are exposed, the duration of the exposure, the pose, the context, and other aspects. Regardless, in many cultures nudity in film is subject to censorship or rating regimes which control the content of films, with the intention of limiting content that is deemed by the classification authorities or the movie industry, or both, to be harmful or undesirable, morally or otherwise.

Many directors and producers apply self-censorship, limiting nudity (and other content) in their films, to avoid external censorship or a strict rating, in countries that have a rating system. Directors and producers may choose to limit nudity because of objections from actors involved, or for a wide variety of other personal, artistic, genre-bound or narrative-oriented reasons.

Outline of human sexuality

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to human sexuality:

Human sexuality is the capacity to have erotic experiences and responses. Human sexuality can also refer to the way one person is sexually attracted to another person of the opposite sex (heterosexuality), the same sex (homosexuality), or having both tendencies (bisexuality). The lack of sexual attraction is referred to as asexuality. Human sexuality impacts cultural, political, legal and philosophical aspects of life, as well as being widely connected to issues of morality, ethics, theology, spirituality, or religion. It is not, however, directly tied to gender.

Paul Thomas (director)

Philip Charles Toubus, better known as Paul Thomas (born April 17, 1949), is an American pornographic film actor and director. He is a member of the AVN Hall of Fame and the XRCO Hall of Fame.

Sexual objectification

Sexual objectification is the act of treating a person as a mere object of sexual desire. Objectification more broadly means treating a person as a commodity or an object without regard to their personality or dignity. Objectification is most commonly examined at the level of a society, but can also refer to the behavior of individuals and is a type of dehumanization.

Although both males and females can be the subjects of sexual objectification, the objectification of women is an important idea in many feminist theories and psychological theories derived from them. Many feminists regard sexual objectification as playing an important role in gender inequality. Psychologists associate objectification with a host of physical and mental health risks in women.

Smart Alec (1951 film)

Smart Alec, aka Smart Aleck, is a 1951 pornographic film. The X-rated silent short, which is no more than 20 minutes in length and was filmed in black-and-white, was one of the most famous and widely circulated of the early underground pornographic era. It has been called "iconographic", "the best known of all American stag films", and the "apogee of the American stag tradition".

The leading actress, then known as Juanita Slusher, a buxom young woman of age 16 who appeared substantially older, later went on to fame as the stripper Candy Barr. Barr was working as a prostitute at the time, and was forced to feature in the film by one of her clients. At the time there was a rumour that the man was Gary Crosby, son of Bing Crosby. It was shot in a Dallas hotel, which was the setting for several other pornographic shorts of the period. Other sources, such as the Internet Movie Database, report that the stag film was shot in San Antonio and the young Juanita was inveigled into appearing in it by a patron of a Dallas strip club where she worked as a cigarette girl and had sex with generous tippers.Barr herself told a men’s magazine that she made the stag film because she was broke and hungry. “I went to the address a friend gave me. The man behind the desk looked me over. He told me I had a great figure. Then he explained he wanted me to act in a risqué film. Then he opened his wallet and counted a bunch of ten-dollar bills. He counted them out on the desk before me, one by one. The purse I clutched in my hands contained exactly seven cents. I made the film."The film led to Barr being called "the first porn star". With Barr's cooperation the FBI subsequently prosecuted the producer for exploitation of a minor. Barr later sued Playboy magazine when it printed a still from the film. Luke Ford, the gossip columnist who wrote A History of X: 100 Years of Sex in Film, said of the stag film "It ruined her life. She regretted it all her days."“Only when my hunger was gone could I think straight. But I was still too young to understand fully just what I had done," Barr told the men's magazine. "I’m still sick with shame over what I did, but when you’re (young) and all alone and your insides are crying for food, you can’t always figure out right from wrong.” The film is included in many compilations of historic pornographic films. Smart Alec was among the films featured in Alex De Renzy's A History of the Blue Movie in 1970. It was later made available on video under the title Smokers of the Past, Vol. 1.

The Private Afternoons of Pamela Mann

The Private Afternoons of Pamela Mann is a 1974 American hardcore adult film starring Barbara Bourbon and directed by Radley Metzger (as "Henry Paris") that is considered one of the classics of the Golden Age of Porn. It was a step forward in the development of the genre, as it had a plot and good acting. The movie can be seen as a meditation on voyeurism, due to the trope of Mann being spied on by a private detective hired by her husband, and the production of pornography itself, as the detective films her sexual encounters.

Porn film star Bill Margold, who went on to be the director of the Free Speech Coalition, has written that "The Private Afternoons of Pamela Mann signals an end to the all-balling, no purpose, disposable mastur-movies that go into one orifice and out another.” Filmed in Manhattan, the movie was released in New York City on December 26, 1974 and was nationally distributed in 1975. The film has been inducted into the XRCO Hall of Fame.

The Tale of Tiffany Lust

The Tale of Tiffany Lust, also known as Body Lust, is a 1979 American adult erotic film. The film was directed by Radley Metzger (as "Henry Paris", uncredited) and filmed in several elaborate locations in New York City.The film was released during the Golden Age of Porn (inaugurated by the 1969 release of Andy Warhol's Blue Movie) in the United States, at a time of "porno chic", in which adult erotic films were just beginning to be widely released, publicly discussed by celebrities (like Johnny Carson and Bob Hope) and taken seriously by film critics (like Roger Ebert).

Unsimulated sex

In the film industry, unsimulated sex is the presentation in a film of sex scenes where the actors engage in an actual sex act, and are not just miming or simulating the actions. At one time in the United States such scenes were restricted by law and self-imposed industry standards such as the Motion Picture Production Code. Films showing explicit sexual activity were confined to privately distributed underground films, such as stag films or "porn loops". Beginning in the late 1960s, most notably with Blue Movie by Andy Warhol, mainstream movies began pushing boundaries in terms of what was presented on screen. Although the vast majority of sexual situations depicted in mainstream cinema are simulated (in early pornography, the main actors engaged in simulated sex, with inserts placed in the film), on rare occasions actors engage in real sex. The difference between these films and pornography is that, while such scenes might be considered erotic, the intent of these films is not solely pornographic.Notable examples include two of the eight Bedside-films and the six Zodiac-films from the 1970s, all of which were produced in Denmark and had many pornographic sex scenes, but were nevertheless considered mainstream films (they all had mainstream casts and crews, and premiered in mainstream cinemas). The last of these films, Agent 69 Jensen i Skyttens tegn, was made in 1978. From the end of the 1970s until the late 1990s it was rare to see hardcore scenes in mainstream cinema, but this changed with the success of Lars von Trier's The Idiots (1998), which heralded a wave of art-house films with explicit content, such as Romance (1999), Baise-moi (2000), Intimacy (2001), Vincent Gallo's The Brown Bunny (2003), and Michael Winterbottom's 9 Songs (2004). Some simulated sex scenes are sufficiently realistic that critics mistakenly believe that they are real, such as the cunnilingus scene in the 2006 film Red Road.

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