Sex comedy

Sex comedy or more broadly sexual comedy is a genre in which comedy is motivated by sexual situations and love affairs. Although "sex comedy" is primarily a description of dramatic forms such as theatre and film, literary works such as those of Ovid[1] and Chaucer[2] may be considered sex comedies.

Sex comedy was popular in 17th century English Restoration theatre. From 1953 to 1965, Hollywood released a number of "will she or won't she?" sex comedies, starring Doris Day, Jack Lemmon and Marilyn Monroe. The United Kingdom released a spate of sex comedies in the 1970s notably the Carry On series. Hollywood released Animal House in 1978, which was followed by a long line of teen sex comedies in the early 1980s, e.g. Porky's, Bachelor Party and Risky Business. Other countries with a significant sex comedy film production include Brazil (pornochanchada), Italy (commedia sexy all'italiana) and Mexico (sexicomedias).

Antiquity

Although the ancient Greek theatre genre of the satyr play contained farcical sex, perhaps the best-known ancient comedy motivated by sexual gamesmanship is Aristophanes' Lysistrata (411 BC), in which the title character persuades her fellow women of Greece to protest the Peloponnesian War by withholding sex.[3] The "boy-meets-girl" plot that is distinctive of Western sexual comedy can be traced to Menander (343–291 BC), who differs from Aristophanes in focusing on the courtship and marital dilemmas of the middle classes rather than social and political satire.[4]

His successor Plautus, the Roman playwright whose comedies inspired the musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, regularly based his plots on sexual situations.[5] The popularity of Plautus's comedies was a major influence on the creation of situation sex comedy.[6]

Restoration sex comedy

William Hogarth - A Rake's Progress - Tavern Scene
The sex comedies of the Restoration predated the theme of the rake in William Hogarth's painting series A Rake's Progress (third painting, 1732–35)

During the decade 1672–82, sex comedy such as The Country Wife (1675) flourished as part of the revival of theatre in England resulting from the Restoration.[7] Forerunners of the craze were John Dryden's An Evening's Love (1668) and Thomas Betterton's The Amorous Widow (ca. 1670).[8] Sexual content was favored by the presence of female performers, in contrast to the drag performances of the Elizabethan stage.[9] The main character was often a self-important rake or libertine, posturing heroically.[10] Adultery was a major theme, and the couple is sometimes found in flagrante delicto, represented by the stage direction "in disorder."[11] The plays are often characterized by sexually charged banter, "swaggering masculine energy," and a superficially innocent heroine who is nonetheless alluring.[12] This theatrical milieu produced the first woman of the Western tradition who made her living as playwright, Aphra Behn (The Rover).

Sex comedy embraces a realm of drama in which women can be contenders. The war is fought with glances and flirtations, wit and beauty, manipulation and desire. And in this battle, women often win—even if the victory is sometimes equivocal.[13]

Presenting seduction and adultery as funny eased moral anxieties that might otherwise have attached to these themes.[14] It is an open question as to whether the plays portraying libertinism endorse the lifestyle, or hold it up to satire and criticism.[15]

After the main vogue of Restoration sex comedy, William Congreve revived and reinvented the form, and bawdy comedy remained popular into the 18th century.[16]

Modern sex comedy

American sex comedy

Film historian Tamar Jeffers McDonald highlights the period 1953 to 1965 as an era where sex comedy came to be the main form of romantic comedy in Hollywood.[17] She claims that 1953 was a key year as the producers of the film The Moon Is Blue challenged the Motion Picture Production Code rules against using the word 'virgin', Hugh Hefner introduced Playboy magazine, and sexologist Alfred Kinsey drew attention to the way women were having sex before marriage. In the movies, playboys played by Rock Hudson or Tony Curtis would try to bed marriage-minded women played by Doris Day or Marilyn Monroe, and the central question would seem to be "will she or won't she?", but in the end, the man would fall for the girl, and sometimes agree to marry her. Notable sex comedies in this period would be Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, Pillow Talk, Irma La Douce, The Seven Year Itch, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Lover Come Back. According to McDonald, by 1965, the sexual revolution was under way, so "will she or won't she?" could no longer serve as the central dynamic, and filmmakers moved on to different topics.

In 1978, National Lampoon's Animal House's success led to a string of raunchy gross-out and sex comedies in the late 1970s and early to mid 1980s. Animal House featured many scenes that would become iconic and often parodied, such as the scene where John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) acts as a "peeping tom" to spy on a half-naked pillow fight at a sorority. In 1981, the film Porky's cemented the wide appeal of the sex comedy. Although it would go on to become the fifth highest-grossing film of the year, it proved to be unpopular with critics, with many accusing it of being degrading to women as well as objectifying of them. The film would lead to three sequels and is credited by many as the start of the "teen" subgenre of the sex comedy. Other sex comedies during this period include the first two Meatballs sequels, Screwballs, Revenge of the Nerds, Spring Break, Bachelor Party, and Hardbodies.

Although not widely considered a "sex comedy," the 1998 critical and financial hit There's Something About Mary has many moments that have entered the pop culture lexicon, particularly the infamous scene in which Ted Stroehmann (Ben Stiller), following a scene of vigorous masturbation, discovers that his semen is hanging off of his ear. Mary (Cameron Diaz), mistaking it for hair gel, nonchalantly grabs it and runs it through her hair.

A year later, the film American Pie was credited with reviving the "teen sex comedy" subgenre. In the film, a group of high schoolers make a pact to lose their virginity before they graduate. The film's most famous scene (which also provides its namesake) involves one of the high schoolers, Jim (Jason Biggs), having intercourse with a fresh apple pie after being told by a friend that it is similar to "getting to third base." The film spawned numerous sequels and spin-off films, all with varying degrees of financial and critical success, and kicked off a second wave of American sex comedy in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

A third wave of American sex comedy emerged in the mid to late 2000s and into the early 2010s with a string of successful sex comedy films by Judd Apatow and his associates. Apatow's 2005 directorial debut The 40-Year-Old Virgin follows Andy Stitzer (Steve Carell) as he struggles with the pressures of reaching the age of 40 without ever having "done the deed." Although the film featured crude sexual humor, it was critically praised for balancing it with an underlying romantic message.[18] Much of the film centers on the attempts of Andy's co-workers to help him lose his virginity, but it is suggested throughout that they know just as little (or possibly less) than Andy about sex, relationships, and what can make a person happy.

Comedians like Andrew Dice Clay, Robert Schimmel and Dave Attell have popularized sexual humour in stand-up.

British sex comedy

According to David McGillivray in his history of the British sex film, Doing Rude Things, Mary Had a Little... (1961) was the first British sex comedy.[19] Bridging the gap between documentary nudist films and the later sex comedies was the film The Naked World of Harrison Marks (1965). George Harrison Marks' love of music hall and slapstick found its way into this spoof documentary biopic.

The precursor to British sex comedies was Norman Wisdom's last starring role, What's Good for the Goose (1969), by Tony Tenser. He specialised in producing exploitation films and founded his own production company Tigon British Film Productions in 1966.[20] In the movie, he leaves his wife and kids to go off on a business trip and has an affair with a young girl, played by Sally Geeson[21] There apparently are two versions of the film: the 98-minute cut version was released in the UK, while the uncensored version (105 minutes) which shows nudity from Sally Geeson, was released in continental Europe.

Percy was directed by Ralph Thomas and starred Hywel Bennett, Denholm Elliott, Elke Sommer, and Britt Ekland. The film is about a successful penis transplant. An innocent and shy young man (Bennett) whose penis is mutilated in an accident and has to be amputated wakes up after an operation to find out that it has been replaced by a womanizer's, which is very large. The rest of the movie is about its new owner following in his predecessor's footsteps and meeting all the women who are able to recognize it. There was a sequel, Percy's Progress, released in 1974.

To move with the times, the Carry On series added nudity to its saucy seaside postcard innuendo. Series producer Peter Rogers saw the George Segal movie Loving and added his two favourite words to the title, making Carry On Loving the twentieth in the series.[22] Starring "countess of cleavage" Imogen Hassall, the story of a dating agency service is still very innocent stuff. It was followed by Carry On Girls, based around a Miss World-style beauty contest. Next in the series was Carry On Dick, with more risqué humour and Sid James and Barbara Windsor's on- and off-screen lovemaking.[23]

The Confessions series

The Confessions series consisted of four sex comedy films released during the 1970s starring Robin Askwith. The films in the Confessions series—Confessions of a Window Cleaner, Confessions of a Driving Instructor, Confessions of a Pop Performer, and Confessions from a Holiday Camp—concern the erotic adventures of Timothy Lea and are based on the novels of Christopher Wood, writing as Timothy Lea.

Soon came Adventures of..., directed by Stanley Long, which started with Adventures of a Taxi Driver, starring sitcom star Barry Evans, and was followed by Adventures of a Private Eye and Adventures of a Plumber's Mate, starring future record producer Christopher Neil. Long began his career as a photographer before producing striptease shorts (or "glamour home movies", as they were sometimes known), for the 8 mm market. Beginning in the late fifties, Long's feature film career would span the entire history of the British sex film, and as such exemplifies its differing trends and attitudes. His work ranges from coy nudist films (Nudist Memories 1959), to moralizing documentary (The Wife Swappers, 1970) to a more relaxed attitude to permissive material (Naughty!, 1971) to out and out comedies at the end of the 1970s. He did not like sex scenes and was dismissive of pornography, saying it did not turn him on and he turned his back when such scenes were being filmed.[24]

Carry Ons become sexy

British sex comedy films became mainstream with the release in 1976 of Carry On England, starring Judy Geeson, Patrick Mower, and Diane Langton, in which an experimental mixed-sex anti-aircraft battery in wartime is enjoying making love not war. However, the arrival of the new Captain S. Melly brings an end to their cosy life and causes terror in the ranks.

In Carry On Emmannuelle, the beautiful Emmannuelle Prevert just cannot get her own husband into bed. A spoof of Emmanuelle, the film revolves around the eponymous heroine (Suzanne Danielle) and her unsuccessful attempts to make love to her husband, Emile (Kenneth Williams), a French ambassador. Emile grants Emmannuelle permission to sleep with anyone she likes, and her promiscuity turns her into a celebrity and a frequent talk show guest. Meanwhile, Theodore Valentine is besotted by her and wants them to get married. But Emmannuelle is obsessed with arousing her husband's sexual desire at almost any cost. This was the last of the original Carry On films.

Sleaze and sexploitation

Producer/director Kenneth F. Rowles made a copycat cash-in with his The Ups and Downs of a Handyman.[25] His next movie, Take an Easy Ride, purports to be a public information film warning of the dangers of hitchhiking but is actually a sexploitation film showing young girls being sexually assaulted and murdered (although Rowles says he had to add those scenes on request of the movie's distributor).[26]

Films like Dreams of Thirteen, The Younger the Better, Geilermanns Töchter - Wenn Mädchen mündig werden, Erika's Hot Summer, Mrs. Stone's Thing, and Come Play With Me played in Soho and elsewhere, but with the arrival of the Margaret Thatcher government in 1979 the Eady Levy was abolished in 1985, killing off the genre.

Japanese sex comedy

In Japanese, sexy movies or TV shows tend to be referred to as 'oiroke' お色気 which might be translated as 'with a tinge of colour.' 'Pink films' ピンク映画 are more narrowly sexy films made by independent studios for release to adult theatres. The traditional word for comedy is 'kigeki' 喜劇. It was applied to Kyōgen, short comic plays performed in theatres. The word 'kigeki' is also used in the titles of some movies from the 1960s, but more recently the loan word 'comedi' コメディ has become the usual way of referring to humorous films or TV shows.

In 1959, director Kon Ichikawa produced an adaptation of Junichirō Tanizaki's novel The Key wherein a man whose powers are failing finds he can restore his vigor by spying on his daughter and her fiance, so he hatches a scheme to involve his wife. Yasuzo Masumura's 1964 film adaptation of Junichirō Tanizaki's novel Manji took a tongue-in-cheek approach to the melodrama of a housewife falling in love with a younger woman. Shohei Imamura released The Pornographers in 1966, parodying the workings of a small pornographic film company.

In 1970-1, Yuji Tanno and Isao Hayashi directed a number of movies based on Go Nagai's manga Harenchi Gakuen. Go Nagai's Kekkou Kamen manga has also been adapted into a movie and several Original Videos. Norifumi Suzuki has directed a number of sex comedies: Ero Shogun to Juuichinin no Aishou (The Erotic Shogun and his 11 Concubines 1972), Onsen Mimizu Geisha (Hot Springs Worm Geisha 1972), Onsen Suppon Geisha (Hot Springs Turtle Geisha 1972) all for big budget studio Toei as well as the teen sex comedy Pantsu no Ana (Hole in her Panties 1984).

Yoshimitsu Morita has directed a number of racey comedies including Something Like It (No You na Mono) (1981), Hot Stripper (Maru Hon Uwasa no Sutorippaa)(1982) and 24 Hour Playboy (Ai to Heisei no Iro Otoko) (1989). Director Juzo Itami's films such as The Funeral, Tampopo and A Taxing Woman are comedies principally about non-sexual topics, but all have a side story that deals with sex, and features nudity. Takeshi Kitano's Getting Any? movie is about the quest for sex. Nikkatsu's Roman Porno series was usually fairly serious, but Morita's Love Hard Love Deep and manga adaptation Minna Agechau were Roman Pornos, and other films in the series such as Pink Tush Girl and Abnormal Family: Older Brother's Bride have been described as comedies.

Recently there has been a spate of sexy coming of age comedies, e.g. Haruka Ayase's Oppai Volleyball and live action adaptations of the manga Tokyo Daigaku Monogatari, Ibitsu, Moteki and Recently, My Sister Is Unusual.

The 2003 Japanese TV drama Stand Up! starring Kazunari Ninomiya is the story of four virgin boys, and bears some resemblance to American sex comedies of the 1980s.

See also

References

  1. ^ Elaine Fantham, "Sexual Comedy in Ovid's Fasti: Sources and Motivation," in Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 87 (1983) 185–216.
  2. ^ Robert R. Edwards, "Narrative," in A Companion to Chaucer (Blackwell, 2000, 2002), p. n. 314.
  3. ^ Jon Solomon, The Ancient World in the Cinema (Yale University Press, 2001), p. 284.
  4. ^ Richard Hornby, Mad about Theatre (Applause Books, 1996), p. 261.
  5. ^ Robert Blumenfeld, Using The Stanislavsky System: A Practical Guide To Character Creation and Period Styles (Limelight Editions, 2008), p. 100.
  6. ^ Paul Kuritz, The Making of Theatre History (1988), p. 51.
  7. ^ Susan J. Owen, Perspectives on Restoration Drama (Manchester University Press, 2002), p. 42.
  8. ^ Owen, Perspectives on Restoration Drama, p. 42.
  9. ^ Elizabeth Woodrough, Women in European Theatre (Intellect Books, 1995), p. 16.
  10. ^ Owen, Perspectives on Restoration Drama, p. 43.
  11. ^ Woodrough, Women in European Theatre p. 16.
  12. ^ Deborah Payne Fisk, introduction to Four Restoration Libertine Plays (Oxford University Press, 2005), p. xii.
  13. ^ Ann Marie Stewart, The Ravishing Restoration: Aphra Behn, Violence, and Comedy (Rosemont, 2010), p. 96.
  14. ^ J.L. Styan, Restoration Comedy in Performance (Cambridge University Press, 1986), p. 242.
  15. ^ Adam Smyth, A Pleasing Sinne: Drink and Conviviality in Seventeenth-Century England (D.S. Brewer, 2004), p. 127; Owen, Perspectives on Restoration Drama, p. 43.
  16. ^ Owen, Perspectives on Restoration Drama, p. 42.
  17. ^ Tamar Jeffers McDonald. 2007. Romantic Comedy: Boy Meets Girl Meets Genre. Wallflower Press.
  18. ^ "Critic Reviews for The 40 Year Old Virgin". Metacritic.
  19. ^ David McGillivray Doing Rude Things: The History of the British Sex Film 1957–1981, Sun Tavern Fields Books, 1992. ISBN 9780951701225.
  20. ^ R.I.P. Tony Tenser « SHADOWPLAY
  21. ^ Peretti, Jacques (January 29, 2005). "Oo-er missus". The Guardian. London. Retrieved May 23, 2010.
  22. ^ Mr Carry On biography of Peter Rogers by Morris Bright and Robert Ross
  23. ^ behind the scenes of Carry Ons Cor, Blimey! on IMDb
  24. ^ Upton, Julian. "British exploitation cinema". Archived from the original on 2009-07-13. Retrieved 2007-02-10.
  25. ^ The Ups and Downs of a Handyman (1975) on IMDb
  26. ^ Matthew Sweet's BBC Four documentary [British B Movies: Truly, Madly, Cheaply http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00c7ytb]

Further reading

  • McDonald, Tamar Jeffers. 2007. Romantic Comedy: Boy Meets Girl Meets Genre. Wallflower Press
  • McDonald, Tamar Jeffers, ed. 2010. Virgin Territory: Representing Sexual Inexperience in Film. Wayne State University Press.
  • Sheridan, Simon. 2011. Keeping the British End Up: Four Decades of Saucy Cinema. Titan Books. 4th edition.
18-Year-Old Virgin

18-Year-Old Virgin is a 2009 American sex comedy film directed by Tamara Olson, written by Naomi L. Selfman and starring Olivia Alaina May, Lauren Walsh and Todd Leigh. It was produced by The Asylum.

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy is a 1982 sex comedy film written, directed by and starring Woody Allen.

The plot is loosely based on Ingmar Bergman's Smiles of a Summer Night. It was the first of 13 movies that Allen would make starring Mia Farrow. Her role was originally written for Diane Keaton, another Allen lead actress, but she was busy promoting her film Reds and preparing to begin production on Shoot the Moon. Julie Hagerty, Mary Steenburgen, Tony Roberts and Jose Ferrer co-starred. It also marks the first appearance of Allen as an ensemble performer in his own film, as previously he had either been the lead character or did not appear in his films.

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy received moderately positive reviews but was nominated for one Razzie Award: Worst Actress, for Mia Farrow – the only time a Woody Allen film has been nominated for a Razzie.

American Pie (film)

American Pie is a 1999 American teen sex comedy film written by Adam Herz and directed by brothers Paul and Chris Weitz, in their directorial film debut. It is the first film in the American Pie theatrical series. The film was a box-office hit and spawned three direct sequels: American Pie 2 (2001), American Wedding (2003), and American Reunion (2012). The film concentrates on five best friends (Jim, Kevin, Oz, Finch, and Stifler) who attend East Great Falls High. With the exception of Stifler (who has already lost his virginity), the guys make a pact to lose their virginity before their high school graduation. The title is borrowed from the song of the same name and refers to a scene in the film, in which the protagonist is caught masturbating with a pie after being told that third base feels like "warm apple pie". Writer Adam Herz has stated that the title also refers to the quest of losing one's virginity in high school, which is as "American as apple pie."

In addition to the primary American Pie saga, there are four direct-to-DVD spin-off films bearing the title American Pie Presents: Band Camp (2005), The Naked Mile (2006), Beta House (2007), and The Book of Love (2009).

In response to the success of American Reunion, a fifth theatrical film, under the working title American Pie 5 was announced on August 4, 2012. In August 2017, Seann William Scott said in an interview that the fourth film probably had not made enough at the domestic box office to warrant another film.

American Reunion

American Reunion (also known as American Pie 4: Reunion or American Pie: Reunion in certain countries) is a 2012 American ensemble sex comedy film written and directed by Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg. It is the fourth installment in the American Pie theatrical series.

Are You Being Served?

Are You Being Served? is a British sitcom created and written by executive producer David Croft (Croft also directed some episodes) and Jeremy Lloyd, with contributions from Michael Knowles and John Chapman, for the BBC. Set in London, the show follows the misadventures and mishaps of the staff of the retail ladies' and gentlemen's clothing departments in the flagship department store of a fictional chain called Grace Brothers.

The series was broadcast on the BBC for ten series, totalling 69 episodes between 8 November 1972 and 1 April 1985 – and included 5 Christmas specials. There was also a 1977 film, a spin-off series Grace & Favour with some of the same main cast in 1991–92, and a one-off episode with a new cast in 2016. Since its original release, all 69 episodes, the restored pilot, the Christmas specials, the sequel and the film have been released on DVD.

Are You Being Served? was a great success in the UK and was also popular in three other countries of the Commonwealth of Nations (Canada, New Zealand, and Australia), and was successfully aired in The Netherlands and Belgium with Dutch subtitles. The show was also popular in Israel and in the United States, where it gained a loyal and enthusiastic following when PBS television stations began airing reruns of it in the mid-1980s, along with other British sitcoms. In 2004, it was ranked 20th in a television countdown of Britain's Best Sitcom. It is regularly repeated worldwide (BBC Two, Drama and Gold in the UK; PBS BBC America in the United States; and BBC UKTV, Fox Classics and 9Gem in Australia).

Bavarian porn

Bavarian porn is a campy subgenre of comic erotic cinema from Germany.

Easy A

Easy A (stylized as easy A) is a 2010 American teen comedy film directed by Will Gluck, written by Bert V. Royal and starring Emma Stone, Stanley Tucci, Patricia Clarkson, Thomas Haden Church, Dan Byrd, Amanda Bynes (in her last film before acting hiatus), Penn Badgley, Cam Gigandet, Lisa Kudrow, and Aly Michalka. The screenplay was partially inspired by the novel The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Shot at Screen Gems studios and in Ojai, California, the film was released on September 17, 2010, received positive reviews with major praise drawn towards Stone's performance and was a major financial success, grossing $75 million worldwide, against an $8 million budget.

EuroTrip

EuroTrip is a 2004 American sex comedy film directed by Jeff Schaffer and written by Alec Berg, David Mandel, and Schaffer. It stars Scott Mechlowicz, Jacob Pitts, Michelle Trachtenberg, Travis Wester, and Jessica Boehrs (in her film debut). Mechlowicz portrays Scott "Scotty" Thomas, an American teenager who travels across Europe in search of his German pen pal, Mieke (Boehrs). Accompanied by his friend Cooper (Pitts) and siblings Jenny and Jamie (Trachtenberg and Wester), Scott's quest takes him to London, Paris, Amsterdam, Bratislava, Berlin, and Rome, encountering awkward, humorous, and embarrassing situations along the way.

Great Grand Masti

Great Grand Masti (transl. Great grand fun) is a 2016 Indian Hindi-language horror adult comedy film directed by Indra Kumar. It is the third installment in the Masti film series after Masti (2004) and Grand Masti (2013).

It features Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Aftab Shivdasani and Urvashi Rautela in the lead roles. Originally scheduled to release on 22 July 2016, the date was advanced to 15 July 2016 after a pirated copy of the film was reportedly leaked online . Censor Board made 23 deletions from the film including some dialogue deletions and a complete scene and gave the film an A certificate.

Hung (TV series)

Hung is a comedy-drama television series which ran on HBO from June 28, 2009 to December 4, 2011. It was created by Colette Burson and Dmitry Lipkin and stars Thomas Jane as Ray Drecker, a struggling suburban Detroit high-school basketball and baseball coach who resorts to male prostitution. The second season premiered on June 27, 2010, and concluded its 10-episode run on September 12, 2010. The third and final season premiered on October 2, 2011, and concluded its 10-episode run on December 4, 2011.

Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3

Kya Kool Hain Hum 3 (transl. How cool we are 3) is a 2016 Indian adult comedy film starring Tusshar Kapoor, Aftab Shivdasani and Mandana Karimi in lead roles along with Gizele Thakral, Claudia Ciesla, Krishna Abhishek, Shakti Kapoor, Darshan Jariwala in pivotal roles. It was released on January 22, 2016. The film is a sequel to 2012 film Kyaa Super Kool Hain Hum and the third installment of Kyaa Kool Hain Hum film series. Box Office India declared the film "Average".

Mexican sex comedy

The Mexican sex comedies film genre, generally known as Ficheras film or Sexicomedias is a genre of sexploitation and Mexploitation films of the Mexican cinema that flourished in the 1970s and 1980s. It is recognized as a collection of usually low quality films with low budgets. Although the films had sexual tones and used double entendre, they were not particularly explicit. The genre is possibly based on the Italian erotic comedies. The popular term for it came from the film Las ficheras, produced and released in 1975, which described the experiences of many women who entertained men at nightclubs.

The settings and plots of these films tended to be simple. Though they enjoyed box-office success and were popular, they are now generally regarded as poor examples of Mexican cinema; moreover, they frequently received classification as being unsuitable for minors.

Some of the films of this Mexican genre included El rey de las ficheras, La pulquería, Muñecas de medianoche, Bellas de noche, and Entre ficheras anda el diablo.

The best-known Mexican actors and actresses who were known to have participated in ficheras films were:

Sasha Montenegro

Angélica Chaín

Andrés García

Mauricio Garcés

Lina Santos

Lyn May

Marcia Bell

Leticia Perdigón

Carmen Salinas

Alfonso Zayas

Jorge Rivero

Alberto Rojas "El caballo"

Rafael Inclán

Roberto Ibañez

Leopoldo García Peláez Benítez "Polo Polo"

Antonio Raxel

Raúl Padilla "El Choforo"

Miguel M. Delgado

Luis de Alba

René Ruíz "Tun Tun"

Pedro Weber "Chatanooga"

César Bono

Eduardo de la Peña "Lalo el Mimo"

Rossy Mendoza

Not Another Teen Movie

Not Another Teen Movie is a 2001 American teen comedy film directed by Joel Gallen and written by Mike Bender, Adam Jay Epstein, Andrew Jacobson, Phil Beauman, and Buddy Johnson. It features an ensemble cast including Chyler Leigh, Chris Evans, Jaime Pressly, Eric Christian Olsen, Eric Jungmann, Mia Kirshner, Deon Richmond, Cody McMains, Sam Huntington, Samm Levine, Cerina Vincent, Ron Lester, Randy Quaid, Lacey Chabert, and Riley Smith.

Released on December 14, 2001 by Columbia Pictures, it is a parody of teen movies. While the general plot is based on She's All That as well as Varsity Blues, 10 Things I Hate About You, Can't Hardly Wait and Pretty in Pink, the film is also filled with allusions to teenage and college-age films from the 1980s and 1990s, such as Bring It On, American Pie, Cruel Intentions, American Beauty, Never Been Kissed, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Can't Buy Me Love, Jawbreaker, Sixteen Candles, Lucas, Rudy, and The Breakfast Club.

Porky's

Porky's is a 1981 Canadian-American sex comedy film written and directed by Bob Clark about the escapades of teenagers in 1954 at the fictional Angel Beach High School in Florida. Released in the United States in 1982 with an R rating, the film influenced many writers in the teen film genre and spawned two sequels: Porky's II: The Next Day (1983) and Porky's Revenge! (1985) and a remake of the original titled Porky's Pimpin' Pee Wee (2009). Porky's was the fifth-highest grossing film of 1982.

Superbad (film)

Superbad is a 2007 American coming-of-age teen comedy film directed by Greg Mottola and produced by Judd Apatow. The film stars Jonah Hill and Michael Cera as Seth and Evan, two teenagers about to graduate high school. Before graduating, the boys want to party and lose their virginity, however their plan proves harder than expected. Written by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, the script began development when they were 13 years old, and was loosely based on their experience in Grade 12 in Vancouver during the 1990s; the main characters have the same given names as the two writers. Rogen was also initially intended to play Seth, but due to age and physical size this was changed, and Hill went on to portray Seth, while Rogen portrayed the irresponsible Officer Michaels, opposite former Saturday Night Live star Bill Hader as Officer Slater.

The film received favorable reviews, with critics praising the dialogue and the chemistry between the two leads. The film also proved financially successful, grossing $169 million on a $20 million budget.

Teen film

Teen film is a film genre targeted at teenagers and young adults in which the plot is based upon the special interests of teenagers and young adults, such as coming of age, attempting to fit in, bullying, peer pressure, first love, teen rebellion, conflict with parents, teen angst or alienation. Often these normally serious subject matters are presented in a glossy, stereotyped or trivialized way. For legal reasons, many teenage characters are portrayed by young adults. Some teen films appeal to young males while others appeal to young females.

Films in this genre are often set in high schools and colleges or contain characters that are of high school or college age.

The 40-Year-Old Virgin

The 40-Year-Old Virgin is a 2005 American sex comedy film directed by Judd Apatow. The film stars Steve Carell (who co-wrote the film's screenplay with Apatow) as the titular 40-year-old virgin Andy Stitzer, a stock supervisor at an electronics store and a toy hobbyist, whose friends resolve to help him lose his virginity. Catherine Keener and Paul Rudd also star. It was the directorial debut of Apatow. The screenplay features a great deal of improvised dialogue. The film was released theatrically in North America on August 19, 2005. It received positive reviews from critics and grossed $177 million worldwide.

There's Something About Mary

There's Something About Mary is a 1998 American comedy film directed by Bobby and Peter Farrelly. It stars Cameron Diaz as the titular character with Matt Dillon, Ben Stiller, Lee Evans and Chris Elliott all playing men who are in love with Mary and vying for her affections.

The film was placed 27th in the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Laughs: America's Funniest Movies, a list of the 100 funniest movies of the 20th century. In 2000, readers of Total Film magazine voted it the fourth-greatest comedy film of all time. Diaz won a New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress, an MTV Movie Award for Best Performance, an American Comedy Award for Best Actress, a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Best Actress. She also received a Golden Globe nomination for her performance. It was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy. It won 4 out of 8 MTV Movie Awards, including Best Movie.

Wedding Crashers

Wedding Crashers is a 2005 American comedy film directed by David Dobkin, written by Steve Faber and Bob Fisher, and starring Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn, Christopher Walken, Rachel McAdams, Isla Fisher, Bradley Cooper, and Jane Seymour. The film follows two divorce mediators (Wilson and Vaughn) who crash weddings in an attempt to meet and seduce bridesmaids.

The film opened on July 15, 2005 through New Line Cinema to critical and massive commercial success, grossing $285 million worldwide on a $40 million budget, and is credited with helping to revive the popularity of adult-oriented, R-rated comedies.

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