Servaline genet

The servaline genet (Genetta servalina) is a genet species native to Central Africa. As it is widely distributed and considered common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.[1]

Servaline genet
Servaline Genet
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Viverridae
Genus: Genetta
Species:
G. servalina
Binomial name
Genetta servalina
Pucheran, 1855
Servaline Genet area
Servaline genet range

Characteristics

The servaline genet's fur is rufous with black spots on neck, back and sides. Its feet are black. Its long tail is banded with wide black and narrow white rings.[2] It is short-haired and has a dark broken stripe along the spine. The tip of its tail is bright.[3]

Measurements of male museum specimens range from 490 to 510 mm (19 to 20 in) in head and body with a 450 to 465 mm (17.7 to 18.3 in) long tail. Females range from 445 to 495 mm (17.5 to 19.5 in) in head and body with a 368 to 485 mm (14.5 to 19.1 in) long tail.[4]

Distribution and habitat

The Servaline genet is distributed from the Sanaga River in Cameroon southwards to the Congo Basin and eastwards to Uganda and Tanzania.[5] In the Republic of Congo, it was recorded by camera-traps in the Western Congolian forest–savanna mosaic of Odzala-Kokoua National Park during surveys in 2007.[6]

In Tanzania's Udzungwa Mountains, a Lowe's servaline genet was recorded in 2000 and photographed in 2002 for the first time. In 2005, camera trap records were also obtained in the Uluguru and Nguru ranges at altitudes of 950–1,400 m (3,120–4,590 ft). It is thought possible that it also occurs in other parts of the Eastern Arc Mountains.[7]

The Zanzibar servaline genet is endemic to Unguja Island, Zanzibar, and became known to science in 1995 when a specimen was killed close to the Jozani forest.[8] Several individuals were recorded by camera traps for the first time in January 2003 in the Jozani-Chwaka Bay National Park.[9]

Taxonomy

The servaline genet was first described by Jacques Pucheran in 1855.[2] Five subspecies are recognised:[10]

  • G. s. servalina, the nominate subspecies
  • G. s. bettoni (Thomas, 1902)
  • G. s. schwarzi (Crawford-Cabral, 1970)
  • Lowe's servaline genet (G. s. lowei) (Kingdon, 1977) was described on the basis of a single skin collected in 1932 in the Udzungwa Mountains, Tanzania.[7]
  • Zanzibar servaline genet (G. s. archeri) (Van Rompaey and Colyn, 1998)[8]

The crested servaline genet (G. cristata) was also considered to be a subspecies of the servaline genet, but is now generally regarded as a distinct species.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Gaubert, P.; De Luca, D.W.; Rovero, F. & Do Linh San, E. (2016). "Genetta servalina". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2016: e.T41700A97163789. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T41700A97163789.en. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  2. ^ a b Pucheran, J. (1855). Genetta servalina. Revue et magasin de zoologie pure et appliquée: 154.
  3. ^ Gaubert, P., Taylor, P. J., & Veron, G. (2005). Integrative taxonomy and phylogenetic systematics of the genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genetta): a new classification of the most speciose carnivoran genus in Africa. In: Huber, B. A., Sinclair, B. J., Lampe, K.-H. (eds.) African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium of Tropical Biology, Museum König, Bonn. Springer. Pp. 371–383.
  4. ^ Van Rompaey, H. and Colyn, M. (2013). Genetta servalina Servaline Genet. In: J. Kingdon and M. Hoffmann (eds.) The Mammals of Africa. V. Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses, pp. 242–245. Bloomsbury, London, UK.
  5. ^ Gaubert, P.; Papeş, M.; Peterson, A.T. (2006). "Natural history collections and the conservation of poorly known taxa: Ecological niche modeling in central African rainforest genets (Genetta spp.)". Biological Conservation. 130: 106–117. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2005.12.006.
  6. ^ Henschel, P., Malanda, G.A. and Hunter, L. (2014). "The status of savanna carnivores in the Odzala-Kokoua National Park, northern Republic of Congo". Journal of Mammalogy. 95 (4): 882–892. doi:10.1644/13-MAMM-A-306.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  7. ^ a b Rovero, F.; Doggart, N.; Bowkett, A. & Burgess, N. (2006). "Conservation News: New Records for Lowe's Servaline Genet from the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania". Oryx. 40 (2): 139. doi:10.1017/S0030605306000688.
  8. ^ a b Van Rompaey, H.; Colyn, M. (1998). "A new servaline genet (Carnivora, Viverridae) from Zanzibar island". South African Journal of Zoology. 33 (1): 42–46.
  9. ^ Goldman, H. V. & Winther-Hansen, J. (2003). "The Small Carnivores of Unguja: Results of a Photo-trapping Survey in Jozani Forest Reserve, Zanzibar, Tanzania" (PDF). Retrieved 2007-01-11.
  10. ^ Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Order Carnivora". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 557. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.

External links

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Crested servaline genet

The crested servaline genet (Genetta cristata), also known as the crested genet, is a genet species endemic to Nigeria and Cameroon. As the population has declined due to loss of habitat, it is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. It was first recorded in the Mamfe Division in Cameroon and initially considered a subspecies of the servaline genet (Genetta servalina). But now it is regarded as a distinct species.

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Zanzibar servaline genet

The Zanzibar servaline genet (Genetta servalina archeri) is a recently discovered subspecies of servaline genet endemic to Unguja Island in the Tanzanian archipelago of Zanzibar. Its conservation status is uncertain.

Extant Carnivora species

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