Serial Item and Contribution Identifier

The Serial Item and Contribution Identifier (SICI) is a code (ANSI/NISO standard Z39.56) used to uniquely identify specific volumes, articles or other identifiable parts of a serial. It is "intended primarily for use by those members of the bibliographic community involved in the use or management of serial titles and their contributions".

Description

It is an extension of the International Standard Serial Number, which identifies an entire serial (similar to the way an ISBN number identifies a specific book). The ISSN applies to the entire publication, however, including every volume ever printed, so this more specific identifier was developed by the Serials Industry Systems Advisory Committee (SISAC) to allow references to specific parts of a journal.

The variable-length, free of charge, code is compatible with other identifiers, such as DOI, PII and URN.[1][2] Prior to January 2009, SICIs were valid DOI suffixes for registration at the CrossRef registration agency. However, to accommodate a security problem with Microsoft's Internet Explorer, they decided that they would soon refuse to register DOI suffixes that contain the colon character[3] .

The SICI is a recognized international standard and is in wide use by publishers and the bibliographic community, primarily as an aid to finding existing articles or issues.[4] JSTOR adopted SICIs in 2001 as its primary article-level identifier and the core of its stable and citation-derivable URLs. SICI was selected over simpler alternatives because of its ability to encompass the many varieties of journal metadata found in JSTOR's archive.[5] However, due to difficulties encountered by its partners in calculating the correct values for the title code and the check digit, JSTOR's implementation of the standard ignores those elements.[6][7] JSTOR now recommends against using SICI, and instead strongly suggests using DOIs instead.[8] This is also done because sometimes multiple articles on the same page have the exact same name (in particular "Obituary").

Details

The SICI code is composed of three segments, intended to be both human-readable and easy for machines to parse automatically. The following example SICI is explained below:[9]

Item
Abstract from Lynch, Clifford A. "The Integrity of Digital Information; Mechanics and Definitional Issues." JASIS 45:10 (Dec. 1994) p. 737-44
SICI
0002-8231(199412)45:10<737:TIODIM>2.3.TX;2-M

Item segment

0002-8231
This is the ISSN for the serial, in this case the Journal of the American Society for Information Science
(199412)
The chronology part is in parentheses and identifies the date of publication. In this case, it is signified by year and month; 1994 December
45:10
The enumeration part signifies the volume and number; Vol. 45, no. 10.

Contribution segment

<
Signifies the start of the contribution segment
737
Location code: signifies the page number, frame number, reel number, etc. In this case, page 737
TIODIM
Title code: based on the title of the article. In this case, an initialism: "The Integrity of Digital Information; Mechanics and Definitional Issues".
>
Signifies the end of the contribution segment

Control segment

2
Code Structure Identifier (CSI) for the type of SICI being constructed
3
Derivative Part Identifier (DPI) identifies a part of the contribution, such as a table of contents or abstract
TX
Format identifier two-letter code signifying the way content is presented. In this case, TX = printed text
2-
Standard version number
M
Check character allows a computer to detect errors in the code, similar to ISBN's check digit

Examples

Item
Bjorner, Susanne. "Who Are These Independent Information Brokers?" Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science, Feb-Mar. 1995, Vol. 21, no. 3, page 12
SICI
0095-4403(199502/03)21:3<12:WATIIB>2.0.TX;2-J

Information

To use as an info URI, the SICI is percent-encoded and prefixed.

INFO
info:sici/1046-8188(199501)13:1%3C69:FTTHBI%3E2.0.TX;2-4

URN

To use in a URN, the SICI is percent-encoded and prefixed.[10] For example, to create a URN for a specific article "From text to hypertext by indexing" in the journal ACM Transactions on Information Systems:

SICI
1046-8188(199501)13:1<69:FTTHBI>2.0.TX;2-4
URN
URN:SICI:1046-8188(199501)13:1%3C69:FTTHBI%3E2.0.TX;2-4

This could then be used to refer to the article inside an HTML citation (in the <cite> element), for instance, in a way that is superior to an HTTP link for documents that are not on the web or have transient URLs:[11]

A model is presented for converting a collection of documents to hypertext by means of indexing. The documents are assumed to be semistructured, i.e., their text is a hierarchy of parts, and some of the parts consist of natural language. The model is intended as a framework for specifying hypertextual reading capabilities for specific application areas and for developing new automated tools for the conversion of semistructured text to hypertext.

An internet draft proposal to officially register the SICI namespace for URNs with IANA was made in 2002, but is currently dormant.[12][13]

DOI

SICI codes can be used as the item ID in a DOI identifier.[14] In the following example, the number 10.1002 is the DOI's publisher ID, a slash acts as a separator, and the rest, which is publisher-specific, is the SICI code:

  • 10.1002/0002-8231(199601)47:1<23:TDOMII>2.0.TX;2-2

CrossRef no longer allows DOIs with colons to be registered, greatly reducing the usefulness of such SICIs.[3]

See also

  • The BICI is a draft with a very similar format and functionality, using an ISBN instead of an ISSN, used to identify components of a book.
  • ISSN
  • DOI
  • NISO
  • OpenURL – tries to solve similar problems like SICI

References

  1. ^ Morgan, Cliff. "The DOI (Digital Object Identifier)". Archived from the original on 2004-03-17.
  2. ^ Paskin, Norman (September 1996). "Document identifiers: an update on current activities". ICSTI Forum (23). Archived from the original on 2002-11-18.
  3. ^ a b "Creating a DOI suffix".
  4. ^ "6. Evaluation of the Identification Schemes". Archived from the original on 2012-02-05.
  5. ^ JSTOR and "Deep Linking" Archived 15 July 2012 at Archive.today — No. 5, Issue 2, JSTORNEWS, June 2001
  6. ^ Koppel, Ted (July 2004). "The SICI Emerges, Cicada-Like, After Eight Years of Dormancy" (PDF). Information Standards Quarterly. 16 (3): 4. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  7. ^ The SICI Standard — JSTOR Archived 13 August 2006 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ "SICI Linking". While we will continue to support SICI linking, we advise that linking partners use OpenURL syntax for the most reliable linking experience
  9. ^ What is the SICI? — Bibliographic Management Factfile — UKOLN
  10. ^ Using Existing Bibliographic Identifiers as Uniform Resource Names Archived 3 January 2007 at the Wayback MachineRFC 2288
  11. ^ "URNs and bibliographic citations in web authoring – BenMeadowcroft.com".
  12. ^ Hakala, Juna. "Using Serial Item and Contribution Identifiers as Uniform Resource Names".
  13. ^ URN NID Assignment Status
  14. ^ Powell, Andy (1 January 1997). "Unique Identifiers in a Digital World" (8).

External links

Book Item and Component Identifier

The Book Item and Component Identifier, or BICI, is a draft standard of the United States National Information Standards Organization (NISO) that would provide a unique identifier for items or components within a book or publication to which an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) has been assigned. It is related to the Serial Item and Contribution Identifier (SICI).

Citation

A citation is a reference to a published or unpublished source. More precisely, a citation is an abbreviated alphanumeric expression embedded in the body of an intellectual work that denotes an entry in the bibliographic references section of the work for the purpose of acknowledging the relevance of the works of others to the topic of discussion at the spot where the citation appears.

Generally the combination of both the in-body citation and the bibliographic entry constitutes what is commonly thought of as a citation (whereas bibliographic entries by themselves are not). References to single, machine-readable assertions in electronic scientific articles are known as nanopublications, a form of microattribution.

Citations have several important purposes: to uphold intellectual honesty (or avoiding plagiarism), to attribute prior or unoriginal work and ideas to the correct sources, to allow the reader to determine independently whether the referenced material supports the author's argument in the claimed way, and to help the reader gauge the strength and validity of the material the author has used.As Roark and Emerson have argued, citations relate to the way authors perceive the substance of their work, their position in the academic system, and the moral equivalency of their place, substance, and words. Despite these attributes, many drawbacks and shortcoming of citation practices have been reported, including for example honorary citations, circumstantial citations, discriminatory citations, selective and arbitrary citations.The forms of citations generally subscribe to one of the generally accepted citations systems, such as the Oxford, Harvard, MLA, American Sociological Association (ASA), American Psychological Association (APA), and other citations systems, because their syntactic conventions are widely known and easily interpreted by readers. Each of these citation systems has its advantages and disadvantages. Editors often specify the citation system to use.

Bibliographies, and other list-like compilations of references, are generally not considered citations because they do not fulfill the true spirit of the term: deliberate acknowledgement by other authors of the priority of one's ideas.

Identifier

An identifier is a name that identifies (that is, labels the identity of) either a unique object or a unique class of objects, where the "object" or class may be an idea, physical [countable] object (or class thereof), or physical [noncountable] substance (or class thereof). The abbreviation ID often refers to identity, identification (the process of identifying), or an identifier (that is, an instance of identification). An identifier may be a word, number, letter, symbol, or any combination of those.

The words, numbers, letters, or symbols may follow an encoding system (wherein letters, digits, words, or symbols stand for (represent) ideas or longer names) or they may simply be arbitrary. When an identifier follows an encoding system, it is often referred to as a code or ID code. For instance the ISO/IEC 11179 metadata registry standard defines a code as system of valid symbols that substitute for longer values in contrast to identifiers without symbolic meaning. Identifiers that do not follow any encoding scheme are often said to be arbitrary IDs; they are arbitrarily assigned and have no greater meaning. (Sometimes identifiers are called "codes" even when they are actually arbitrary, whether because the speaker believes that they have deeper meaning or simply because they are speaking casually and imprecisely.)

The unique identifier (UID) is an identifier that refers to only one instance—only one particular object in the universe. A part number is an identifier, but it is not a unique identifier—for that, a serial number is needed, to identify each instance of the part design. Thus the identifier "Model T" identifies the class (model) of automobiles that Ford's Model T comprises; whereas the unique identifier "Model T Serial Number 159,862" identifies one specific member of that class—that is, one particular Model T car, owned by one specific person.

The concepts of name and identifier are denotatively equal, and the terms are thus denotatively synonymous; but they are not always connotatively synonymous, because code names and ID numbers are often connotatively distinguished from names in the sense of traditional natural language naming. For example, both "Jamie Zawinski" and "Netscape employee number 20" are identifiers for the same specific human being; but normal English-language connotation may consider "Jamie Zawinski" a "name" and not an "identifier", whereas it considers "Netscape employee number 20" an "identifier" but not a "name". This is an emic indistinction rather than an etic one.

International Standard Book Number

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country.

The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book Numbering (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten-digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero digit "0").

Privately published books sometimes appear without an ISBN. The International ISBN agency sometimes assigns such books ISBNs on its own initiative.Another identifier, the International Standard Serial Number (ISSN), identifies periodical publications such as magazines and newspapers. The International Standard Music Number (ISMN) covers musical scores.

International Standard Serial Number

An International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication, such as a magazine. The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975. ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard.

When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media. The ISSN system refers to these types as print ISSN (p-ISSN) and electronic ISSN (e-ISSN), respectively. Conversely, as defined in ISO 3297:2007, every serial in the ISSN system is also assigned a linking ISSN (ISSN-L), typically the same as the ISSN assigned to the serial in its first published medium, which links together all ISSNs assigned to the serial in every medium.

Publisher Item Identifier

The Publisher Item Identifier (PII) is a unique identifier used by a number of scientific journal publishers to identify documents. It uses the pre-existing ISSN or ISBN of the publication in question, and adds a character for source publication type, an item number, and a check digit.

The system was adopted in 1996 by the American Chemical Society, the

American Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society,

Elsevier Science, and the IEEE.

Serial (publishing)

In publishing and library and information science, the term serial is applied to materials "in any medium issued under the same title in a succession of discrete parts, usually numbered (or dated) and appearing at regular or irregular intervals with no predetermined conclusion."

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