Sequoia National Forest

Sequoia National Forest is located in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The U.S. National Forest is named for the majestic Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) trees which populate 38 distinct groves within the boundaries of the forest.

The Giant Sequoia National Monument is located in the national forest. Other notable features include glacier-carved landscapes and impressive granite monoliths. The Needles are a series of granite spires atop a narrow ridge above the Kern River. Forest headquarters are located in Porterville, California. There are local ranger district offices in Dunlap, Kernville, Lake Isabella, and Springville.[2]

Sequoia National Forest
Long Meadow Grove CA
Long Meadow Grove on a misty day
Map showing the location of Sequoia National Forest
Map showing the location of Sequoia National Forest
LocationTulare / Kern / Fresno counties, California, US
Nearest cityBakersfield, CA / Porterville, CA /
Coordinates36°2′24″N 118°30′16″W / 36.04000°N 118.50444°WCoordinates: 36°2′24″N 118°30′16″W / 36.04000°N 118.50444°W
Area1,193,315 acres (4,829.17 km2)[1]
Established1908
Governing bodyU.S. Forest Service
WebsiteSequoia National Forest

Geography

The Sequoia National Forest covers 1,193,315 acres (1,864.555 sq mi; 4,829.17 km2),[1] and ranges in elevation from 1,000 feet (300 m) in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to over 12,000 feet (3,700 m). Its giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves are part of its 196,000 acres (790 km2) of old growth forests. Other tree species include:[3]

The Needles

The Needles are a series of granite spires atop a narrow ridge above the Kern River.(36°07′17″N 118°30′16″W / 36.1214°N 118.5044°W)[4]

Wilderness areas

There are six wilderness areas within Sequoia NF that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Some of these extend into neighboring National Forests, as indicated. Two of them also extend into land that is managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Recreation

The National Forest contains over 2,500 miles (4,000 km) of road and 850 miles (1,370 km) of trails, and hosts a number of camping and recreational facilities. The forest is adjacent to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

History

Sequoia National Forest was established on July 1, 1908 from a portion of Sierra Forest Reserve. On March 2, 1909 Theodore Roosevelt added land by Presidential Proclamation.[5] On July 1, 1910 1,951,191 acres (7,896.19 km2) was removed from the forest to create the Kern National Forest.[6] This land was returned to Sequoia National Forest on July 1, 1915.

Giant sequoia groves

The Sequoia National Forest has 34 giant sequoia groves.

  1. Indian Basin Grove (GSNM) A mid-size grove, mostly logged. It can be accessed by paved roads. The grove contains many young sequoias approaching diameters of up to 10 feet (3.0 m). 36°48′N 118°56′W / 36.800°N 118.933°W 1800–2000 m.
  2. Converse Basin Grove (GSNM). Once the second-largest grove, but much logged around 1890-1900; However, nearly 100 widely scattered old-growth Giant Sequoias remain (apparently bypassed by the loggers), also good regrowth of younger trees. Home of the Boole Tree, which the loggers spared as it was by far the largest tree in the grove and is now identified as the sixth-largest tree by volume. Also home of the Chicago Stump, which is the remnant of the General Noble Tree that was cut for the 1893 World Columbian Exposition; the General Noble Tree was the second largest tree in the grove (after the Boole Tree) and it was the largest tree ever cut down. Although not among the very largest Giant Sequoias, the General Noble Tree was perhaps among the top 30 largest Giant Sequoias before it was cut. 36°48′N 118°58′W / 36.800°N 118.967°W 1800–2000 m.
  3. Lockwood Grove (GSNM). 36°48′N 118°52′W / 36.800°N 118.867°W 1700–1800 m.
  4. Monarch Grove (GSNM). Immediately north of the Agnew Grove, near Monarch Wilderness boundary. On Forest Service GSNM map.
  5. Evans Grove (GSNM). Partially logged, before 1920. 36°48'N 118°49'30"W 2050–2250 m.
  6. Agnew & Deer Meadow Grove (GSNM). 36°47′20″N 118°46′45″W / 36.78889°N 118.77917°W 1950–2000 m.
  7. Cherry Gap Grove (GSNM). Logged. Located between Converse Basin Grove and General Grant Grove, near McGee Overlook (36°46′40″N 118°57′30″W / 36.77778°N 118.95833°W). 2070 m. Cherry Gap Grove is a small sequoia grove of about thirty-five acres in Sequoia national forest; it was logged of all of its old growth sequoias.
  8. Abbott Creek Grove (GSNM). 36°46′N 118°58′W / 36.767°N 118.967°W 1900 m. Listed by Rundel and Flint; very small (largely logged); too few trees to qualify as a grove according to Willard.
  9. Kennedy Grove (GSNM). 36°46′0″N 118°49′20″W / 36.76667°N 118.82222°W 2050–2250 m. Contains the 13th largest giant sequoia in the world, The Ishi Giant.
  10. Little Boulder Creek Grove (GSNM). 36°45′10″N 118°49′0″W / 36.75278°N 118.81667°W 2000 m.
  11. Boulder Creek Grove (GSNM). 36°45′N 118°49′W / 36.750°N 118.817°W 2050 m.
  12. Landslide Grove (GSNM). 36°45′0″N 118°51′50″W / 36.75000°N 118.86389°W 2050–2250 m.
  13. Bearskin Grove (GSNM). 36°45′0″N 118°54′40″W / 36.75000°N 118.91111°W 1850–1900 m.
  14. Big Stump Grove (KCNP/GSNM). 36°43′N 118°58′W / 36.717°N 118.967°W 1850 m.
  1. Redwood Mountain Grove (KCNP/GSNM). The largest grove, 1240 ha (3100 acres), with 15,800 sequoias 30 cm (one foot) or more in diameter at the base.
  1. Upper Tule Grove (GSNM). Included on Forest Service GSNM map.
  2. Maggie Mountain Grove (GSNM).
  3. Silver Creek Grove (GSNM).
  4. Mountain Home Grove (CSF / GSNM). Home of the 'Genesis' tree, seventh largest by volume, this grove also contains the smaller Middle Tule Grove
  5. Burro Creek Grove (GSNM).
  6. Wishon Grove (GSNM). South of Silver Creek Grove. Included on Forest Service GSNM map.
  7. Alder Creek Grove (GSNM / private); also known as Hossack, Pixley, or Ross Creek Grove. Home of 'Alonzo Stagg', the fifth largest tree by volume. Also home to the Waterfall tree, which has the largest circumference and diameter at ground level of any sequoia.
  8. McIntyre Grove (GSNM).
  9. Carr Wilson Grove(GSNM); also known as Bear Creek Grove.
  10. Freeman Creek Grove (GSNM).
  11. Black Mountain Grove (GSNM / TIR / private). Heavily logged in 1984, though mature sequoias were not cut.
  12. Red Hill Grove (GSNM / private).
  13. Peyrone Grove (GSNM / TIR).
  14. South Peyrone Grove (GSNM) New discovery by Willard in 1992.
  15. Long Meadow Grove (GSNM), Site of the Trail of 100 Giants and one tree of great size.
  16. Cunningham Grove (GSNM).
  17. Starvation Creek Grove (GSNM).
  18. Packsaddle Grove (GSNM).
  19. Deer Creek Grove (GSNM). The southernmost grove.

Giant Sequoia National Monument

On April 15, 2000, President Bill Clinton proclaimed 328,000-acre (1,330 km2) of the Sequoia National Forest as the Giant Sequoia National Monument by Presidential Proclamation 7295, published in the Federal Register, Tuesday, April 25, 2000, Vol. 65, No. 80.

The monument is in two sections. The northern section surrounds General Grant Grove and other parts of Kings Canyon National Park and is administered by the Hume Lake Ranger District. The southern section is directly south of Sequoia National Park and is administered by the Western Divide Ranger District, surrounding the eastern half of the Tule River Indian Reservation.

Marijuana

The forest has been the scene of extensive illegal marijuana cultivation, with recent involvement of Mexican drug cartels.[7][8]

Photos

Grizzly Falls, Sequoia National Forest

Grizzly Falls in Kings Canyon.

Havilah CA USFS Service Center

Havilah Work Center.

Alder creek CA giant Sequoias

Giant Sequoias.

Frog Meadow, Sequoia National Forest

Frog Meadow.

Tobias Lookout - Southern View

Tobias Lookout.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Land Areas of the National Forest System" (PDF). U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved 2012-03-19.
  2. ^ USFS Ranger Districts by State
  3. ^ Warbington, Ralph; Beardsley, Debby (2002). "2002 Estimates of Old Growth Forests on the 18 National Forests of the Pacific Southwest Region". United States Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region.
  4. ^ Mountain Project - The Needles
  5. ^ "Proclamation – Adding Lands to the Sequoia National Forest". Retrieved 2009-12-04.
  6. ^ Davis, Richard C. (September 29, 2005). National Forests of the United States (PDF). The Forest History Society. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 12, 2013.
  7. ^ "Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Continues the Fight Against Illegal Marijuana Production" (PDF). National Park Service. 2008-03-17.
  8. ^ "Mexican cartels running pot farms in U.S. national forest". CNN. 2008-08-08.

References

External links

Bull Fire

The Bull Fire was a wildfire that scorched 16,442 acres (6,654 ha) of land in Kern County, California. The fire, which started on July 26, was the largest wildfire of the 2010 California wildfire season, as well as one of the most destructive with 16 structures being destroyed. As the fire progressed it burned in mainly grass and brush on both sides of the Kern River. By July 29 the fire had burned nearly 16,000 acres (6,500 ha) and was 12% contained.As the fire approached the cities of Riverkern and Kernville it forced the evacuations of hundreds of residents as well as Camp Erwin Owen, a juvenile detention camp.It became evident early on that the fire had been caused by humans and investigators sealed off the origin of the fire as a crime scene.

Converse Basin

Converse Basin is a grove of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) trees located in the Giant Sequoia National Monument in the Sierra Nevada, in Fresno County, California.

The grove is situated 5 miles (8 km) north of General Grant Grove, just outside Kings Canyon National Park in the national monument managed by the Sequoia National Forest. The grove is about 3,700 acres (15 km2) with sequoias concentrated in the basin formed by Converse Creek.

Converse Basin was logged of most of its giant sequoias between 1892 and 1918. Some 60-100 large specimens survive out of some 6,000. The grove is composed of thousands of young sequoias together with these few remaining mature trees. This grove was once the second largest grove of giant sequoias in the world. It offers unique opportunities to study the growth of young sequoias and to create timelines from tree rings on the stumps of cut mature trees.

The grove was named after Charles Porter Converse, who settled the basin prior to its logging.

Generals Highway

The Generals Highway is a highway that connects State Route 180 and State Route 198 through Sequoia National Park, Giant Sequoia National Monument, and Kings Canyon National Park in the Sierra Nevada of California.

Giant Sequoia National Monument

The Giant Sequoia National Monument is a 328,000-acre (1,330 km2) U.S. National Monument located in the southern Sierra Nevada in eastern central California. It is administered by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Sequoia National Forest and includes 38 of the 39 Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves that are located in the Sequoia National Forest, about half of the sequoia groves currently in existence, including one of the ten largest Giant Sequoias, the Boole Tree, which is 269 feet (82 m) high with a base circumference of 112 feet (38 m). The forest covers 824 square miles (1,326 square kilometers).

The monument is in two sections. The northern section surrounds General Grant Grove and other parts of Kings Canyon National Park and is administered by the Hume Lake Ranger District. The southern section, which includes Long Meadow Grove, is directly south of Sequoia National Park and is administered by the Western Divide Ranger District, surrounding the eastern half of the Tule River Indian Reservation.

The Giant Sequoia National Monument was created by President Bill Clinton in Proclamation 7295 on April 15, 2000. The Presidential Proclamation was published in the Federal Register, Tuesday, April 25, 2000, Vol. 65, No. 80

Golden Trout Creek

Golden Trout Creek is an approximately 9-mile (14 km) long tributary of the Kern River, flowing in northeastern Tulare County, California.

The creek drains an area of the High Sierra Nevada in the Sequoia National Forest. Volcano Creek is a tributary of it.

Golden Trout Wilderness

The Golden Trout Wilderness is a federally designated wilderness area in the Sierra Nevada, in Tulare County and Inyo County, California. It is located 40 miles (64 km) east of Porterville, California within Inyo National Forest and Sequoia National Forest.

It is 303,511 acres (1,228.3 km2) in size and was created by the US Congress in 1978 as part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. The wilderness is managed by the U.S. Forest Service.

The wilderness is named for and protects the habitat of California's state freshwater fish, the golden trout.

Elevations range from about 680 feet (210 m) to 12,900 feet (3,900 m).

Within the wilderness are portions of the Kern Plateau, the Great Western Divide's southern extension, and the main stem of the Kern River, the South Fork of the Kern and the Little Kern River.

The wilderness area is bordered on the northeast and northwest by the high peaks of the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains. Cirque Peak is the high point at 12,894 feet (3,930 m).

Greenhorn Mountains

The Greenhorn Mountains are a mountain range of the Southern Sierra Nevada, in California. They are protected within the Sequoia National Forest.

Hume, Fresno County, California

Hume (formerly, Humes) is an unincorporated community in Fresno County, California. It is located 50 miles (80 km) east of Fresno, at an elevation of 5344 feet (1629 m). Hume is located in the 93628 ZIP Code, in area code 559.

Hume is situated on Hume Lake in the Sequoia National Forest, not far from the west entrance to Kings Canyon National Park. Much of the community and the lake is devoted to the tourism industry.

Many of Hume's residents live in the Hume Lake Subdivision.Hume has been characterized as the "most conservative community" in the state of California.The largest facility at the lake is Hume Lake Christian Camps a Christian camp and conference center.

Hume Lake

Hume Lake is a reservoir in the Sierra Nevada, within Sequoia National Forest and Fresno County, central California.

It is on Tenmile Creek, which is a tributary of the Kings River, and adjacent to the unincorporated community of Hume.

The surface elevation of the lake is 1,585 m (5,200 ft). It is accessible from California Route 180, via Forest Service road 30, and is about 50 mi (80 km) east of Fresno, not far from the west entrance to Kings Canyon National Park.

The 87-acre (35 ha) lake lies behind the world's first concrete reinforced multiple arch dam, designed by John S. Eastwood and constructed in 1908 by the Hume-Bennett Lumber Company. During lumber operations, the lake stored logs for an adjacent mill and supplied water for a flume used to transport the cut lumber to Sanger, California.

Since the cessation of logging in 1924, Hume Lake has shifted from primarily industrial use and is now mainly used for recreation.

Jennie Lakes Wilderness

Jennie Lakes Wilderness is a protected area in the Sierra Nevada, in Tulare County, California. It is located 60 miles (97 km) east of Fresno and managed by the US Forest Service.

Jennie Lakes Wilderness is about nine square miles within the Sequoia National Forest, that was established by the California Wilderness Act of 1984, and added to the National Wilderness Preservation System.

The Jennie Lakes Wilderness is a classic high Sierra landscape. A 10,500 acre area with a mixture of lakes, mountain peaks, forests, meadows and streams, most of which is above 7,000 feet (2,100 meters) in elevation. The wilderness contains variations of alpine and sub-alpine forest. Lodgepole Pines, Red and White Firs and White (Mountain) Pine dominate the area, while Jeffrey Pines and a few juniper are also present. In the summer, wildflowers are common. Jennie Lake sits about 9,000 feet (2,750 meters) above sea level and Weaver Lake is slightly lower.

The summit of Mitchell Peak is the highest point in the wilderness at 10,365 feet (3,140 meters) and features views of the surrounding area and of Kings Canyon National Park.

In the Jennie Lakes Wilderness, there are two principal lakes, Jennie Ellis Lake and Weaver Lake. Both lakes tend to be busy on weekends (especially holidays). Weaver Lake attracts a lot of day hikers as it lies close to the trailhead. Jennie Lake is often a stop for hikers coming from or going into Sequoia National Park to the south.Campers are expected to avoid camping within 100' of either of the main lakes. Due to growing overuse, a Forest Order is in effect during the busy summer season to help protect the riparian areas near the lakeshores.Smaller and more remote, there is also a pond above JO Pass about a mile east of Jennie Lake and "Poison Pond" sits about a half-mile south of Weaver Lake. Both have a few campsites around them.There are four trailheads that give access to 26 miles of trails as well as connecting walkers to the epic Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Park's backcountry - Big Meadow, Rowell Meadow, Marvin Pass and Stony Creek.

Kiavah Wilderness

The Kiavah Wilderness is a federally designated wilderness area located in the Mojave Desert, Scodie Mountains, and Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains in Kern County, California, United States. California State Route 178 connects the town of Lake Isabella, California to state Highway 14 in the east, crossing Walker Pass at the north boundary of the wilderness.

The Kiavah Wilderness was created in 1994 with the passage of the California Desert Protection Act (Public Law 103-433), is jointly managed by the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and is mostly within the Sequoia National Forest. This wilderness is part of the National Cooperative Land and Wildlife Management Area and the BLM's Jawbone-Butterbredt Area of Critical Environmental Concern, which was designated to protect critical wildlife and Native American values.

Lake Isabella

Lake Isabella also called Isabella Lake, is a reservoir in Kern County, California, United States created by the earthen Isabella Dam. It was formed in 1953 when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dammed the Kern River at the junction of its two forks at Whiskey Flat. At 11,000 acres (4,500 ha), it is one of the larger reservoirs in California. The area is in the southern end of the Sierra Nevada range and the lake itself is located in low mountains at an elevation of approximately 2,500 ft (760 m) where summer temperatures reach over 100 °F (38 °C) but low enough to avoid winter snows on the surrounding ridges. Lake Isabella is located about 40 miles (64 km) northeast of Bakersfield, and is the main water supply for that city. Lake Isabella can be reached by car from Bakersfield via state Highway 178 and from Delano via Highway 155. The former towns of Isabella and Kernville were flooded by the newly created reservoir.

Lime Kiln Creek

For the creek in England, see Lime Kiln Creek, Kingston upon HullLime Kiln Creek is a stream within Tulare County in central California. An alternative name for this creek is Dry Creek.

Lion Fire

The Lion Fire was the 3rd largest fire of the 2011 California wildfire season. The fire, which was the result of a lightning strike, burned 20,674 acres (84 km2) of land in the Sequoia National Forest. As the fire grew it forced the evacuations of many popular campgrounds in Sequoia National Park.

List of giant sequoia groves

The following is a list of giant sequoia groves. All naturally occurring groves of giant sequoias are located in moist, unglaciated ridges and valleys of the west slope of the Sierra Nevada range in California, United States. They occur between 1370 – 2000 meters (4500–6500 ft) elevation in the northern half of the range, and 1700–2250 m (5500–7500 ft) in the south.

Groves in the northern half of the range (north of the Kings River) are widely scattered and mostly small, while those south of the Kings River are more numerous. The total area of all the groves combined is approximately 14,416 ha (35,607 acres). The groves are listed from north to south in the list below.

This list is based on five different sources, with slightly varying views on what constitutes a discrete grove; the differing interpretations are noted in italics. The lists of groves were compiled by Rundel (1972; recognizing 75 groves), Flint (1987; recognizing 65 groves), Willard (1994; recognizing 65 groves), the Giant Sequoia National Monument Visitor's Guide (2003) and the Draft Giant Sequoia National Monument Plan 2010. Currently, the U.S. National Park Service cites Rundel's total of 75 groves in its visitor publications. The updated lists from Willard and Flint are now known to be more accurate, therefore some of Rundel's 75 groves have been removed from this list. Below compiles a list of 68 sequoia groves.

McNally Fire

The McNally Fire was a massive wildfire in the Sequoia National Forest which burned 150,696 acres (609.8 km2) in July and August 2002, and the largest wildfire of the 2002 California wildfire season. The fire burned from July 21 to August 29, 2002 through the Sequoia and Inyo National Forest, as well as 5% of Giant Sequoia National Monument. It destroyed 14 structures and cost an estimated $45.7 million to put out. The blaze was started due to the "careless use of fire" near the Roads End Resort in Kern Canyon, and spread east through the canyon and threatened the communities of Johnsondale and Ponderosa. It burned within one mile (1.6 km) of the Packsaddle Grove of giant sequoias.

Pier Fire

The Pier Fire was a wildfire that burned near Springville and in the Sequoia National Forest, in California in the United States. The fire was reported on August 29, 2017. The cause of the fire is under investigation, but is believed to be human-caused. The fire was completely extinguished on November 29, after it had burned 36,556 acres (148 km2). The fire threatened old growth sequoia trees, the Tule River Indian Reservation, and many small communities in the area.

Shirley Fire

The Shirley Fire was a wildfire that started on June 13, 2014 at 5:00 PM PDT, 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Shirley Meadows, Kern County, in the southern part of the Sequoia National Forest. The fire rapidly spread, due to dry weather and drought conditions. By June 15, the Shirley Fire had expanded to 1,800 acres (730 ha), and it was reported as being only 10% contained. As a result, parts of the National Forest were closed, and evacuations were ordered for residences in the area. On June 16, the Shirley Fire expanded eastward towards Lake Isabella to 2,200 acres (890 ha), and began to threaten more homes. The cause of the wildfire is currently under investigation. During the afternoon of June 16, the wildfire was reported to have expanded to 2,646 acres (1,071 ha), but the wildfire was also 50% contained. On June 17, the spread of the fire had stopped, and it was reported to be 75% contained. During the late afternoon of June 17, it was reported that the Shirley Fire was 85% contained. On June 18, the fire was 90% contained. Soon afterwards, many of the firefighters were withdrawn in order to prepare for possible future wildfire outbreaks, due to an approaching heat wave in which temperatures were expected to be in the hundreds. During the same day, the administration of Sequoia National Forest stated that the Shirley Fire was expected to continue burning within the containment line for the next several days, due to continuing drought conditions, an approaching heat wave, and the amount of timber the fire could consume as fuel within its perimeter. On June 20, it was reported that the perimeter of the Shirley Fire was 100% contained, but the wildfire continued to burn well inside of its perimeter while producing moderate amounts of smoke, which was expected to continue for the next several days. The firefighting efforts and the damage caused by the wildfire cost a total of $12,155,450 dollars (2014 USD). On June 21, the USAD Forest Service and the DOI Bureau of Land Management worked together to initiate cleanup efforts, assess the damage caused by the Shirley Fire, and assist in recovery efforts. The two agencies also worked to help bring the Shirley Fire under control, as well as to help the wildlife recover, and to prevent further degradation of resources. At 6:00 PM PDT on June 26, the roadblocks issued for the Shirley Fire were lifted, even though the wildfire continued to burn within the containment line. On July 15, the Shirley Fire was 100% controlled.

South Sierra Wilderness

The South Sierra Wilderness is a federally designated wilderness area in the Southern Sierra Nevada, in eastern California. It is located 65 miles (105 km) northeast of Bakersfield, and is southwest of Owens Lake and Olancha.

National Forests of the United States

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