Senior Bowl

The Senior Bowl is a post-season college football all-star game played each January in Mobile, Alabama, which showcases the best NFL Draft prospects of those players who have completed their college eligibility. First played in 1950 in Jacksonville, Florida, the game moved to Mobile's Ladd–Peebles Stadium the next year. Produced by the non-profit Mobile Arts & Sports Association, the game is also a charitable fund-raiser benefiting various local and regional organizations with over US$5.9 million in donations over its history.

In 2007, telecast of the game moved from ESPN to NFL Network. In 2013, Reese's took over sponsorship, starting with the 2014 game.[1] In January 2018, Reese's announced that they were extending their sponsorship of the game; a specific duration was not given.[1]

Senior Bowl
Reese's Senior Bowl
Senior Bowl logo
StadiumLadd–Peebles Stadium
LocationMobile, Alabama
Previous stadiumsGator Bowl Stadium (1950)
Previous locationsJacksonville, Florida (1950)
Operated1950–present
Sponsors
Delchamps (1996–2001)
Food World (2002–2006)
Under Armour (2007–2011)
Nike (2012–2013)
Reese's (2014–present)
2018 matchup
North vs. South (South 45–16)
2019 matchup
North vs. South (North 34–24)

Background

Two teams, representing the North and the South, are coached by select coaching staff from two NFL teams. In recent years, the coaching staffs have come from teams who finished near the bottom of the league standings, but whose coaches were not subsequently terminated. Organizers stipulate a number of specific rules for the game, some of which are intended to reduce the chance of injury (e.g. "All blocks below the waist are prohibited"), and others that simplify what the teams need to practice and prepare for (e.g. "Only four rushers allowed, no 5-man pressures or blitzes from secondary permitted").[2]

The week-long practice that precedes the game is attended by key NFL personnel (including coaches, general managers and scouts), who oversee the players as possible prospects for pro football. At one point the Senior Bowl was the first chance its participants had to openly receive pay for participation in an athletic event. This was one reason that participation was limited to seniors whose eligibility for further participation in collegiate football had expired, and the game was also their first exposure to the slightly different professional rules. Players who wished to participate in collegiate spring sports had to avoid participation in the Senior Bowl. The significance of all of this has waned in recent years as there has been some lessening of the former strict separation of professional and amateur athletes. Athletes sometimes decline invitations to participate in the Senior Bowl, opting instead to prepare for the NFL scouting combine or their colleges' pro day.[3] In 2013, two players (D. J. Fluker and Justin Pugh) with a year of college football eligibility remaining, but who had already graduated, became the first "fourth-year juniors" to be granted clearance to play in the Senior Bowl.[4]

The game has consistently been played on a Saturday in January, with the exception of 1976, when it was held on a Sunday. The scheduling date within January has varied – the earliest playing has been January 3 (1953 and 1959), while the latest playing has been January 30 (2010 and 2016). Since 1967, it has been traditionally set for the week before the NFL's Super Bowl (which itself is now played in February). It is usually scheduled as the final game of the college football season, but for a period during the 1980s and 1990s, it was the next-to-the-last game, followed a week later by either the Hula Bowl or the Gridiron Classic, both of which are now defunct. From 2007 through 2011, and also in 2013, the Senior Bowl was again the next-to-the-last game, followed by the Texas vs. The Nation Game a week later.

The single-season record for number of players sent to the Senior Bowl from one school is 10 by Alabama in 1987, followed by nine sent by Auburn in 1988 and Southern California in 2008.[5]

Game results

Date Winner Score
North team coach
(AFC 1991–93)
South team coach
(NFC 1991–93)
Notes
January 7, 1950 South 22–13 Bo McMillin, Detroit Lions Steve Owen, New York Giants
January 6, 1951 South 19–18 Bo McMillin, Detroit Lions Steve Owen, New York Giants
January 5, 1952 North 20–6 Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns Steve Owen, New York Giants
January 3, 1953 North 28–13 Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns Steve Owen, New York Giants
January 9, 1954 North 20–14 Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns Steve Owen, New York Giants
January 8, 1955 South 12–6 Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns Steve Owen, New York Giants
January 7, 1956 South 12–2 Buddy Parker, Detroit Lions Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns
January 5, 1957 South 21–7 Joe Kuharich, Washington Redskins Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns
January 11, 1958 North 15–13 Joe Kuharich, Washington Redskins Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns
January 3, 1959 South 21–12 Joe Kuharich, Washington Redskins Paul Brown, Cleveland Browns
January 9, 1960 North 26–7 Jim Lee Howell, New York Giants Weeb Ewbank, Baltimore Colts
January 7, 1961 South 33–26 Jim Lee Howell, New York Giants Weeb Ewbank, Baltimore Colts
January 6, 1962 South 42–7 Tom Landry, Dallas Cowboys Weeb Ewbank, Baltimore Colts
January 5, 1963 South 33–27 Tom Landry, Dallas Cowboys Weeb Ewbank, Baltimore Colts
January 4, 1964 South 28–21 George Wilson, Detroit Lions Tom Landry, Dallas Cowboys
January 9, 1965 Tie 7–7 George Wilson, Detroit Lions Tom Landry, Dallas Cowboys
January 8, 1966 South 27–18 Mike Holovak, Boston Patriots Weeb Ewbank, New York Jets
January 7, 1967 North 35–13 Norm Van Brocklin, Atlanta Falcons Otto Graham, Washington Redskins
January 6, 1968 South 34–21 Mike Holovak, Boston Patriots Hank Stram, Kansas City Chiefs
January 11, 1969 North 27–16 Allie Sherman, New York Giants Charley Winner, St. Louis Cardinals
January 10, 1970 Tie 37–37 Lou Saban, Denver Broncos Don Shula, Baltimore Colts
January 9, 1971 North 31–13 Lou Saban, Denver Broncos Weeb Ewbank, New York Jets
January 8, 1972 South 26–21 Alex Webster, New York Giants J. D. Roberts, New Orleans Saints
January 6, 1973 South 33–30 Lou Saban, Buffalo Bills Weeb Ewbank, New York Jets
January 12, 1974 North 16–13 Mike McCormack, Philadelphia Eagles Don McCafferty, Detroit Lions
January 11, 1975 Tie 17–17 John Ralston, Denver Broncos Dick Nolan, San Francisco 49ers
January 11, 1976 North 42–35 Chuck Fairbanks, New England Patriots Jack Pardee, Chicago Bears
January 8, 1977 North 27–24 Forrest Gregg, Cleveland Browns Don Shula, Miami Dolphins
January 7, 1978 North 17–14 Don Coryell, St. Louis Cardinals Leeman Bennett, Atlanta Falcons
January 13, 1979 South 41–21 Walt Michaels, New York Jets Dick Nolan, New Orleans Saints
January 12, 1980 North 57–3 Bud Grant, Minnesota Vikings Ray Perkins, New York Giants
January 17, 1981 North 23–10 Bill Walsh, San Francisco 49ers Red Miller, Denver Broncos
January 16, 1982 South 27–10 Marv Levy, Kansas City Chiefs Chuck Noll, Pittsburgh Steelers
January 22, 1983 North 14–6 Frank Kush, Baltimore Colts Bum Phillips, New Orleans Saints
January 14, 1984 South 21–20 Kay Stephenson, Buffalo Bills Don Coryell, San Diego Chargers
January 12, 1985 South 23–7 Jim Hanifan, St. Louis Cardinals Forrest Gregg, Green Bay Packers
January 18, 1986 North 31–17 Dan Reeves, Denver Broncos Leeman Bennett, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
January 17, 1987 South 42–38 John Robinson, Los Angeles Rams Don Shula, Miami Dolphins
January 23, 1988 North 21–7 Chuck Knox, Seattle Seahawks Jim Mora, New Orleans Saints
January 21, 1989 South 13–12 Dan Reeves, Denver Broncos John Robinson, Los Angeles Rams
January 20, 1990 North 41–0 Marty Schottenheimer, Kansas City Chiefs Buddy Ryan, Philadelphia Eagles
January 19, 1991 AFC 38–28 Marty Schottenheimer, Kansas City Chiefs Jim Mora, New Orleans Saints
January 18, 1992 AFC 13–10 Art Shell, Los Angeles Raiders Mike Ditka, Chicago Bears
January 16, 1993 NFC 21–6 Ted Marchibroda, Indianapolis Colts Bill Belichick, Cleveland Browns
January 22, 1994 South 35–32 Rich Kotite, Philadelphia Eagles Don Shula, Miami Dolphins
January 21, 1995 South 14–7 Dan Reeves, New York Giants Ted Marchibroda, Indianapolis Colts
January 20, 1996 North 25–10 Dennis Erickson, Seattle Seahawks Dave Wannstedt, Chicago Bears
January 18, 1997 North 35–14 Norv Turner, Washington Redskins Marty Schottenheimer, Kansas City Chiefs
January 17, 1998 South 31–8 Ted Marchibroda, Baltimore Ravens Norv Turner, Washington Redskins
January 23, 1999 South 31–21 Jon Gruden, Oakland Raiders Tony Dungy, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
January 22, 2000 North 24–21 George Seifert, Carolina Panthers Gunther Cunningham, Kansas City Chiefs
January 20, 2001 South 21–16 Bill Cowher, Pittsburgh Steelers Mike Sherman, Green Bay Packers
January 26, 2002 South 41–26 Mike Holmgren, Seattle Seahawks Dave McGinnis, Arizona Cardinals
January 18, 2003 North 17–0 Dom Capers, Houston Texans Marty Mornhinweg, Detroit Lions
January 24, 2004 South 28–10 Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals Marty Schottenheimer, San Diego Chargers
January 29, 2005 North 23–13 Norv Turner, Oakland Raiders Jon Gruden, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
January 28, 2006 North 31–14 Jeff Fisher, Tennessee Titans Mike Nolan, San Francisco 49ers
January 27, 2007 North 27–0 Jon Gruden, Tampa Bay Buccaneers Mike Nolan, San Francisco 49ers notes
January 26, 2008 South 17–16 Lane Kiffin, Oakland Raiders Mike Nolan, San Francisco 49ers notes
January 24, 2009 South 35–18 Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals Jack Del Rio, Jacksonville Jaguars notes
January 30, 2010 North 31–13 Jim Schwartz, Detroit Lions Tony Sparano, Miami Dolphins notes
January 29, 2011 South 24–10 Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals Chan Gailey, Buffalo Bills notes
January 28, 2012 North 23–13 Leslie Frazier, Minnesota Vikings Mike Shanahan, Washington Redskins notes
January 26, 2013 South 21–16 Dennis Allen, Oakland Raiders Jim Schwartz, Detroit Lions notes
January 25, 2014 South 20–10 Mike Smith, Atlanta Falcons Gus Bradley, Jacksonville Jaguars notes
January 24, 2015 North 34–13 Ken Whisenhunt, Tennessee Titans Gus Bradley, Jacksonville Jaguars notes
January 30, 2016 South 27–16 Jason Garrett, Dallas Cowboys Gus Bradley, Jacksonville Jaguars notes
January 28, 2017 South 16–15 John Fox, Chicago Bears Hue Jackson, Cleveland Browns notes
January 27, 2018 South 45–16 Vance Joseph, Denver Broncos Bill O'Brien, Houston Texans notes
January 26, 2019 North 34–24 Jon Gruden, Oakland Raiders Kyle Shanahan, San Francisco 49ers notes
  • All-time series (through the 2019 game): South (35–29–3); AFC (2–1)
  • From 1991 to 1993, the two teams were designated AFC and NFC to distinguish where their coaching staffs were from and to stress the professional nature of the game. This was confusing to some, as the game occurred well before players had been selected by teams in the NFL draft. In 1994, the designations were reverted to the traditional North vs. South format.
  • The first game played in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1950. All subsequent games have been played in Mobile, Alabama.

Game MVPs

Year Name College
1950 Travis Tidwell Auburn
1951 Bucky Curtis Vanderbilt
1952 Al Dorow Michigan State
1953 Harry Agganis Boston University
1954 Gene Filipski Villanova
1955 Bobby Freeman Auburn
1956 Don Goss SMU
1957 Don Bosseler Miami (FL)
1958 Jim Taylor LSU
1959 Theron Sapp
Norm Odyniec
Georgia
Notre Dame
1960 Jacky Lee Cincinnati
1961 Dick Norman Stanford
1962 Earl Gros
Ronnie Bull
LSU
Baylor
1963 Glynn Griffing Ole Miss
1964 Ode Burrell Mississippi State
1965 Steve DeLong Tennessee
1966 Howard Twilley Tulsa
1967 Bubba Smith Michigan State
1968 Kim Hammond Florida State
1969 Jerry Levias SMU
1970 Terry Bradshaw Louisiana Tech
1971 J. D. Hill Arizona State
1972 Pat Sullivan Auburn
1973 Chuck Foreman Miami (FL)
1974 Bill Kollar Montana State
1975 Steve Bartkowski California
1976 Craig Penrose San Diego State
1977 Tommy Kramer Rice
1978 James Lofton Stanford
1979 Willie Jones Florida State
1980 Marc Wilson Brigham Young
1981 Neil Lomax Portland State
1982 John Fourcade
Steve Clark
Ole Miss
Utah
1983 Dan Marino
Terry Kinard
Pittsburgh
Clemson
Year Name College
1984 Walter Lewis
Doug Smith
Alabama
Auburn
1985 Paul Ott Carruth Alabama
1986 Napoleon McCallum Navy
1987 Don Smith Mississippi State
1988 Thurman Thomas Oklahoma State
1989 Cleveland Gary Miami (FL)
1990 Blair Thomas Penn State
1991 Alvin Harper Tennessee
1992 Tony Smith Southern Miss
1993 Eric Hunter Purdue
1994 Stan White Auburn
1995 Derrick Brooks Florida State
1996 Bobby Hoying Ohio State
1997 Pat Barnes California
1998 Dameyune Craig Auburn
1999 Cade McNown UCLA
2000 Chad Pennington Marshall
2001 LaDainian Tomlinson TCU
2002 Antwaan Randle El Indiana
2003 Larry Johnson Penn State
2004 Philip Rivers NC State
2005 Charlie Frye Akron
2006 Sinorice Moss Miami (FL)
2007 Tony Hunt Penn State
2008 Matt Forte Tulane
2009 Pat White West Virginia
2010 Brandon Graham Michigan
2011 Christian Ponder Florida State
2012 Isaiah Pead Cincinnati
2013 EJ Manuel Florida State
2014 Dee Ford Auburn
2015 Ameer Abdullah Nebraska
2016 Dak Prescott Mississippi State
2017 Davis Webb California
2018 Kyle Lauletta Richmond
2019 Daniel Jones Duke

Source: [6]

50th Anniversary Senior Bowl All-Time Team

The following team was selected by fan voting before the 1999 game:[7]

Offense
Pos. Name College Year HOF
QB Joe Namath Alabama 1965 – P
RB Walter Payton Jackson State 1975 C P
RB Bo Jackson Auburn 1986 C –
RB Franco Harris Penn State 1972 – P
WR Steve Largent Tulsa 1976 – P
WR Lynn Swann USC 1974 C P
WR Art Monk Syracuse 1980 C P
TE Ozzie Newsome Alabama 1978 C P
OL Gene Upshaw Texas A&I 1967 – P
OL Jerry Kramer Idaho 1958 – P
OL Mike Webster Wisconsin 1973 – P
OL Randall McDaniel Arizona State 1988 C P
OL Tom Banks Auburn 1970 – –
PK Morten Andersen Michigan State 1982 – P
Defense
Pos. Name College Year HOF
DL Joe Greene North Texas State 1969 C P
DL Ed Jones Tennessee State 1974 – –
DL Bubba Smith Michigan State 1967 C –
DL Jack Youngblood Florida 1971 C P
LB Lee Roy Jordan Alabama 1963 C –
LB Ray Nitschke Illinois 1958 – P
LB Derrick Thomas Alabama 1989 C P
LB Ted Hendricks Miami (FL) 1969 C P
DB Paul Krause Iowa 1964 – P
DB Dale Carter Tennessee 1992 – –
DB Albert Lewis Grambling 1983 – –
DB Roger Wehrli Missouri 1969 C P

HOF: C=College, P=Pro

Senior Bowl Hall of Fame

Established in 1987, the Senior Bowl Hall of Fame seeks to pay tribute to the many outstanding former Senior Bowl players who have made lasting contributions to the game of football. The Senior Bowl Hall of Fame also allows enshrinement to former coaches, administrators and other individuals whose efforts helped the Senior Bowl.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Senior Bowl, Reese's announce extension". seniorbowl.com (Press release). January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  2. ^ "Playing Rules". seniorbowl.com. Retrieved January 15, 2018.
  3. ^ Brugler, Dane (January 14, 2015). "2015 NFL Draft: UCLA QB Brett Hundley declines Senior Bowl". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on January 28, 2015.
  4. ^ "First non-seniors to compete in Senior Bowl". CBS Sports. January 19, 2013. Archived from the original on June 1, 2013. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  5. ^ Low, Chris (January 22, 2008). "Former Trojans happy to be reunited with Kiffin". ESPN.com.
  6. ^ "Game Scores/MVPs". seniorbowl.com. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  7. ^ "All-Time Senior Bowl Team". seniorbowl.com. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  8. ^ "Hall of Fame". seniorbowl.com. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
  9. ^ "Senior Bowl to add 3 to Hall of Fame, Honor Jalyn Armour-Davis". WKRG. March 8, 2018. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
  10. ^ "Hudson, McNeil, Neighbors to be inducted into HOF". seniorbowl.com (Press release). January 14, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.

Further reading

External links

2007 Senior Bowl

The 2007 Under Armour Senior Bowl was a college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2006 college football season and prospects in the 2007 NFL Draft. It was played on January 27, 2007, at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. Coverage of the event was on high-definition on the NFL Network. The North team won, 27–0.

2008 Senior Bowl

The 2008 Under Armour Senior Bowl was a college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2007 college football season and prospects in the 2008 NFL Draft. It was played on January 26, 2008, at 3 p.m. EST at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. Coverage of the event was on high-definition on the NFL Network between January 21–26.

2009 Senior Bowl

The 2009 Under Armour Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2008 college football season, and prospects for the 2009 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL).

The game was played on January 24, 2009, at 6 p.m. local time at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. The South defeated the North, 35–18, and quarterback Pat White of the South team was named game's Most Valuable Player (MVP). Various players were seen to have either improved or harmed their NFL draft prospects through their play in the game and the week leading up to the competition, which was closely monitored by NFL scouts and the media.Coverage of the event was in high-definition on the NFL Network.

2010 Senior Bowl

The 2010 Under Armour Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2009 college football season, and prospects for the 2010 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL), as well as for the United Football League's inaugural draft.The game was played on January 30, 2010, at 3 p.m. local time at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama.Coverage of the event was in high-definition on the NFL Network.

2011 Senior Bowl

The 2011 Under Armour Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2010 college football season, and prospects for the 2011 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL). Final score was South Team 24 to North Team 10.

The game was played on January 29, 2011, at 3 pm CST (4 p.m. Eastern time) at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, between "North" and "South" teams. The coaching staff of the Cincinnati Bengals, led by head coach Marvin Lewis, coached the North team. The coaching staff of the Buffalo Bills, led by head coach Chan Gailey, coached the South team.

For the South team, quarterback Christian Ponder, formerly with Florida State, threw 132 yards and two touchdowns and was named the Most Valuable Player. Leonard Hankerson, former Miami Hurricanes wide receiver, had five catches for 100 yards and one touchdown. He was named the Under Armour Offensive Player of the Game.

Coverage of the event was in high-definition on the NFL Network.

2012 Senior Bowl

The 2012 Nike Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2011 college football season, and prospects for the 2012 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL).

The game was played on January 28, 2012, at 3 pm CST (4 p.m. Eastern time) at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, between "North" and "South" teams. This year's Senior Bowl concluded the 2011-12 post-season as the NFLPA's Texas vs The Nation game, which would have been played the following week, was canceled. The coaching staff of the Minnesota Vikings, led by head coach Leslie Frazier, coached the North team. The coaching staff of the Washington Redskins, led by head coach Mike Shanahan, coached the South team.

Coverage of the event was provided in high-definition on the NFL Network.

2013 Senior Bowl

The 2013 Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2012 college football season, and prospects for the 2013 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL).

The game was played on January 26, 2013, (4 p.m. ET), at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, between "North" and "South" teams, with the South winning 21–16. The coaching staff of the Detroit Lions, led by head coach Jim Schwartz, coached the South team. The coaching staff of the Oakland Raiders, led by head coach Dennis Allen, coached the North team. Schwartz had previously coached in the 2010 Senior Bowl.Coverage of the event was provided on the NFL Network. The referee for the game, David Smith of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), was a quarterback for Alabama and MVP of the 1988 Sun Bowl.

2014 Senior Bowl

The 2014 Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featured players from the 2013 college football season, and prospects for the 2014 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL). The game concluded the post-season that began on December 21, 2013. It was sponsored by Reese's Peanut Butter Cups and is officially known as the Reese's Senior Bowl.The game was played on January 25, 2014, at 3:00 p.m. CST, at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, between "North" and "South" teams, with the South team winning the game 20–10. Mike Smith of the Atlanta Falcons and Gus Bradley of the Jacksonville Jaguars served as the North and South head coaches, respectively.Coverage of the event was provided on the NFL Network.

2016 Senior Bowl

The 2016 Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season, and prospects for the 2016 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL). The game concluded the post-season that began on December 19, 2015. It was sponsored by Reese's Peanut Butter Cups and is officially known as the Reese's Senior Bowl.The game was played on January 30, 2016, at 1:30 p.m. CST, at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, between "North" and "South" teams. Coverage of the event was provided on the NFL Network.

2017 Senior Bowl

The 2017 Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2016 NCAA Division I FBS football season, and prospects for the 2017 Draft of the professional National Football League (NFL). The game concluded the post-season that began on December 17, 2016. It was sponsored by Reese's Peanut Butter Cups and is officially known as the Reese's Senior Bowl. The game was coached by John Fox of the Chicago Bears and Hue Jackson of the Cleveland Browns.The Game was played on January 28, 2017, at 1:30 p.m. CST, at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, between "North" and "South" teams. Coverage of the event was provided by NFL Network.

2018 Senior Bowl

The 2018 Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game featuring players from the 2017 NCAA Division I FBS football season, and prospects for the 2018 draft of the professional National Football League (NFL). The game was the last of the 2017–18 bowl games and the final game of the 2017 FBS football season. It was sponsored by Reese's Peanut Butter Cups and was officially known as the Reese's Senior Bowl.

The game was played on January 27, 2018, at 1:30 p.m. CST, at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, between "North" and "South" teams; coverage of the event was provided by NFL Network.Bowl organizers announced that, for the first time, RFID devices would be used to track players and footballs during practices and the game. The maker of the RFID devices, Zebra Sports Solutions, was also announced as a corporate sponsor of the game.

2019 Senior Bowl

The 2019 Senior Bowl was an all-star college football exhibition game played on January 26, 2019, at 1:30 p.m. CST, at Ladd–Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. The game featured prospects for the 2019 draft of the professional National Football League (NFL), predominantly from the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season, rostered into "North" and "South" teams. The game was the last of the 2018–19 bowl games and the final game of the 2018 FBS football season. It was sponsored by Reese's Peanut Butter Cups and officially known as the Reese's Senior Bowl, with television coverage provided by NFL Network.Coaching staffs were announced on December 31, 2018; Jon Gruden and the Oakland Raiders staff for the North team, and Kyle Shanahan and the San Francisco 49ers staff for the South team.

Isaac Yiadom

Isaac Yiadom (born February 20, 1996) is an American football cornerback for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). A graduate of Doherty Memorial High School in Worcester, Massachusetts, he played college football at Boston College.

Ladd–Peebles Stadium

Ladd–Peebles Stadium (formerly Ernest F. Ladd Memorial Stadium) is a stadium located in Mobile, Alabama.

Opened 70 years ago in 1948, it has a seating capacity of 33,471. It is primarily used for American football, and is the home field for the Senior Bowl, the Dollar General Bowl, and the University of South Alabama Jaguars. In addition to football, the stadium is also used for concerts (maximum capacity 50,000), boxing matches, high school graduations, trade shows, and festivals. Numerous entertainers have performed at Ladd–Peebles Stadium.

O. J. Howard

O'Terrius Jabari "O. J." Howard (born November 19, 1994) is an American football tight end for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama, and was drafted by the Buccaneers in the first round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

Ronnie Bull (American football)

Ronald David Bull (born February 2, 1940) is a retired American football running back. He played running back at Bishop High School in Bishop, Texas.

Bull played halfback at Baylor University wearing jersey No. 25 from 1958 to 1961. While at Baylor he played at the Gator Bowl against the University of Florida. He also played in the East–West Shrine Game, the Senior Bowl, and the College All-Star Game.

Bull was drafted in the 1962 American Football League Draft by the Dallas Texans with the team's first pick, but elected to play for the National Football League instead. Bull was taken out of the Baylor University by the Chicago Bears as the seventh pick in the first round in the 1962 NFL Draft. He played for the Bears wearing jersey No. 29 and the Philadelphia Eagles wearing jersey No. 47. During his career, Bull played in 123 games, carried the ball 881 times for 3,222 yards and 9 touchdowns. He was named the 1962 Senior Bowl most valuable player and 1962 UPI NFL-NFC Rookie of the Year. Bull was among the inaugural inductees in the Texas High School Hall of Fame in 1985. He was also inducted into the Chicagoland Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.

He currently runs his specialty advertising business, Ronnie Bull Sales, Inc in the Chicago area.

Senior Bowl (bridge)

The d'Orsi Senior Bowl, or Senior Bowl or d'Orsi Bowl, is a biennial world championship contract bridge tournament for national teams of "Seniors", players age 60 and older.

It is contested every odd-number year under the auspices of the World Bridge Federation (WBF), alongside the Bermuda Bowl (Open) and Venice Cup (Women). Entries formally represent WBF Zones as well as nations

so it is also known as the "World Zonal Senior Team Championship", one of three "World Zonal Team Championships".

It became an official world championship event in 2001 following a successful exhibition in 2000.

Alternatively, the d'Orsi Senior Bowl is the trophy awarded to the winning team. It was donated at the 2009 tournament in Brazil by former WBF President Ernesto d'Orsi,

and the tournament was renamed at that time.France won its first title in the 6th Senior Bowl tournament, October 2011 in Veldhoven, Netherlands. USA 2

and Poland placed second and third.In the 2013 tournament, held in Bali, Indonesia, the original winners were Germany, with USA2 second and Poland third. Two members of the Germany team were later found to be cheating and the WBF awarded USA 2 first, Poland second and France third. The 2015 championship, held in Chennai, India, was won by USA1 ahead of Sweden, with Poland third.

Tommy Kramer

Thomas Francis "Tommy" Kramer (born March 7, 1955) is an American former professional football player who was a quarterback in the NFL from 1977 to 1990. He played collegiately at Rice University and was selected by the Minnesota Vikings in the first round (27th overall) of the 1977 NFL Draft after being named MVP of the 1977 Senior Bowl. He was inducted with the 2012 class into the College Football Hall of Fame.

World Bridge Championships

The World Bridge Championships consists of several sets of championships organized under the auspices of the World Bridge Federation.

Senior Bowl
College Football Playoff
Other bowl games
Future bowl games
All-Star games

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