Second baseman

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between second and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base in Major League Baseball since 1950.[1] In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Good second basemen need to have very good range since they have to field balls closer to the first baseman who is often holding runners on, or moving towards the base to cover. On a batted ball to right field, the second baseman goes out towards the ball for the relay. Due to these requirements, second base is sometimes a primarily defensive position in the modern game, but there are hitting stars as well.

Baseball 2B
The position of the second baseman

Functions

Mark Ellis on June 6, 2011
Second baseman Mark Ellis of the Oakland Athletics hit for the cycle in 2007.

The second baseman catches line drives or pop flies hit near him, and fields ground balls hit near him and then throws the ball to a base to force out a runner. In this case, if the runner is to be forced out at second base then that base is covered by the shortstop.

With a runner on first base, on a ground ball to the shortstop or third baseman the second baseman will cover second base to force out the runner coming from first. Moreover, if there are fewer than two outs he will attempt to turn the double play: that is, he will receive the throw from the other player with his foot on second base (to force out the runner coming from first base), and in one motion pivot toward first base and throw the ball there (to force out the batter before he gets there).

If a runner on first base attempts to steal second base, or if the pitcher attempts to pick off a runner already at second base, then either the second baseman or the shortstop will cover second base.

National Baseball Hall of Fame second basemen

BookletCoverHowToPlaySecondBase1905
Cover of a 1905 how-to booklet

The following second basemen have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum:[2]

Notes
  1. ^ Began as a catcher, but played second base for the bulk of his career
  2. ^ Later played at first base
  3. ^ Played second base in the early portion of his career
  4. ^ Started his career at first base, then moved to second base

Multiple Gold Glove Award winners

Number of seasons with 100+ double plays turned at second base (among Hall of Fame second basemen)

Source: baseball-reference.com

References

  1. ^ "From 1950 to 2013, Throws LH, Played: 2B". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved 2010-06-03.
  2. ^ "Stats for Hall of Fame Second Basemen : A Research List by Baseball Almanac". Baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved 2015-07-26.
Baseball positions

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. Within the game there are positions in which each player can play in.

There are nine fielding positions in baseball. Each position conventionally has an associated number, which is used to score putouts:

1 (pitcher), 2 (catcher), 3 (first baseman), 4 (second baseman), 5 (third baseman), 6 (shortstop), 7 (left fielder), 8 (center fielder), and 9 (right fielder).For example:

If the third baseman fields a ball and throws it to first, it is recorded as a 5-3 out.

A double play where the second baseman fields, throws to the shortstop covering second base, who throws to the first baseman, is recorded as a 4-6-3 double play. This is not the only way to make a double play.

Bid McPhee

John Alexander "Bid" McPhee (November 1, 1859 – January 3, 1943) was an American 19th-century Major League Baseball second baseman. He played 18 seasons in the majors, from 1882 until 1899, all for the Cincinnati Reds franchise. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000. Known more for his fielding than his hitting, McPhee was the last second baseman to play without a glove.

Bill Hallman (second baseman)

William Wilson Hallman (March 31, 1867 – September 11, 1920) was an American professional baseball second baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for six teams during his 14-year career, including one stint as a player-manager for the 1897 St. Louis Browns. He was the uncle of Bill Hallman, an outfielder for four seasons.

DJ LeMahieu

David John LeMahieu (; born July 13, 1988) is an American professional baseball second baseman for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Chicago Cubs and Colorado Rockies.

The Cubs selected LeMahieu in the second round of the 2009 MLB draft, and he made his MLB debut for the Cubs in 2011 before being traded to the Rockies before the 2012 season. LeMahieu won a Gold Glove Award in 2014, 2017, and 2018 and was named an MLB All-Star in 2015 and 2017, and won the National League batting title in 2016. After becoming a free agent, he signed with the Yankees before the 2019 season, where he has played as a third baseman, second baseman and occasionally as a first baseman. His versatility on defense and hitting ability earned him the nickname 'LeMachine' by Gary Sanchez. He was also selected as a starter for the American League in the 2019 All-Star game.

Danny Murphy (second baseman)

Daniel Francis Murphy (August 11, 1876 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – November 22, 1955 in Jersey City, New Jersey) was a second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1900 to 1915. He managed the Jersey City Skeeters in 1919.

He spent most of his career with the Philadelphia Athletics and moved from second base to outfielder in 1910 to make room for the Athletics' new second baseman Eddie Collins. In the Athletics 1913 World Championship season, Murphy's playing time was limited by a broken knee cap, and he did not play in the World Series, but he served as the team's acting captain.In 1,496 games, Murphy batted .289 (1563-5399) with 705 runs scored, 289 doubles, 102 triples, 44 home runs, 702 RBI, 193 stolen bases,, an on-base percentage of .336 and a slugging percentage of .405 in 16 seasons. In 16 World Series games, he hit .305 (18-59) with one home run and 12 RBI.

Dave Campbell (infielder)

David Wilson "Dave" Campbell (born January 14, 1942) is a former American baseball player and sportscaster. His nickname is "Soup", a reference to the brand name Campbell's Soup.

Infielder

An infielder is a baseball player stationed at one of four defensive "infield" positions on the baseball field.

Jeff Kent

Jeffrey Franklin Kent (born March 7, 1968) is an American former professional baseball second baseman. He played seventeen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1992 to 2008 for the Toronto Blue Jays, New York Mets, Cleveland Indians, San Francisco Giants, Houston Astros, and Los Angeles Dodgers.

Kent won the National League Most Valuable Player award in 2000 with the San Francisco Giants, and is the all-time leader in home runs among second basemen. He drove in 90 or more runs from 1997 to 2005, a streak of run production for a second baseman which is a position typically known for its defense. Kent is a five-time All-Star, and his 560 career doubles put him tied for 21st on the all-time doubles list.

Jimmy Williams (second baseman)

James Thomas Williams (December 20, 1876 – January 16, 1965) was a second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1899 to 1909. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Baltimore Orioles, New York Highlanders, and St. Louis Browns. The power-hitting Williams set several records during his rookie season and led a major league in triples three times. He stood at 5' 9" and weighed 175 lbs.

Joe Quinn (second baseman)

Joseph "Joe" James Quinn (December 25, 1864 – November 12, 1940) was an Australian second baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball. Born in Ipswich, Queensland, to Patrick Quinn and Catherine, née McAfee, both from Ireland, he was the only Australian-born player to reach the major leagues until Craig Shipley in 1986.

José Altuve

José Carlos Altuve (Spanish pronunciation: [alˈtuβe]; born May 6, 1990) is a Venezuelan professional baseball second baseman for the Houston Astros of Major League Baseball (MLB). The Astros signed Altuve as an amateur free agent in 2007, and he made his major league debut in 2011. A right-handed batter and thrower, as of 2017 he was the shortest active MLB player at 5 feet 6 inches (1.68 m). His listed weight is 165 pounds (75 kg). From 2014 to 2017, Altuve recorded at least 200 hits each season and led the American League (AL) in the category. He won three batting championships in that span.

A six-time MLB All-Star, Altuve has been voted the starting second baseman for the AL in the All-Star Game four times. In 2017, he won the AL Most Valuable Player Award, the Hank Aaron Award, and became a World Series champion with the Astros, each for the first time. Also in 2017, Altuve was Sports Illustrated's co-Sportsperson of the Year with J. J. Watt of the NFL's Houston Texans for helping to lead relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Further awards Altuve received in 2017 were the Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year, The Sporting News Major League Player of the Year (making him the fifth player to be selected in consecutive years), and Baseball America's Major League Player of the Year. He has also won five Silver Slugger Awards and one Rawlings Gold Glove. In 2014, he became the first player in over 80 years to reach 130 hits and 40 stolen bases before the All-Star Game. That same season, he became the first Astro to win a batting title, leading the AL with a .341 average. He has twice led the AL in stolen bases. From Maracay, Venezuela, Altuve played for the Venezuelan national team in the 2017 World Baseball Classic (WBC).

José Ortiz (second baseman)

José Daniel Ortiz Flores is a former professional baseball player. He has played all or part of three seasons in the majors, and is currently playing for the Saitama Seibu Lions of the Pacific League in Japan.

José Ramírez (infielder)

José Enrique Ramírez (born September 17, 1992) is a Dominican professional baseball third baseman for the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball (MLB). He signed with Indians as an amateur free agent on November 26, 2009, and made his MLB debut on September 1, 2013. A right-handed thrower and switch hitter, Ramírez stands 5 feet 9 inches (1.75 m) and weighs 175 pounds (79 kg).

Ramírez was selected for both the MLB All-Star Game and Silver Slugger Award for the first time in 2017. He became the 19th player in history to hit at least 56 doubles in one season, while leading the major leagues in 2017. Ramírez is under contract with the Indians until 2021.

Larry Doyle (baseball)

Lawrence Joseph Doyle (July 31, 1886 – March 1, 1974), nicknamed "Laughing Larry", was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1907 to 1920 who played almost his entire career for the New York Giants. The National League's outstanding second baseman during the 1910s, he was awarded the 1912 Chalmers Award as the league's best player, and won the 1915 batting title with a .320 average. The team captain and top everyday star on three consecutive pennant winners (1911–13), his .408 career slugging average was the top mark by an NL second baseman when he retired, as were his career totals in hits (1887), doubles (299), triples (123), total bases (2654) and extra base hits (496). He ended his career among the major league leaders in career games (5th, 1730), putouts (9th, 3635), assists (9th, 4654), total chances (9th, 8732) and double plays (5th, 694) at second base, and set Giants franchise records for career games, at bats and doubles, each of which was broken by Bill Terry.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Fred Pfeffer is the all-time leader in errors as a second baseman with 857 career. Pfeffer is the only second basemen to commit over 800 career errors. Bid McPhee (792) and Cub Stricker (701) and the only other second basemen to commit more than 700 career errors.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Bid McPhee is the all-time leader in career putouts as a second baseman with 6,552. Eddie Collins (6,526) and Nellie Fox (6,090) are the only other second basemen with over 6,000 career putouts.

List of second-generation Major League Baseball players

The following is a list of father-and-son combinations who have played or managed in Major League Baseball (MLB).

Luis Castillo (second baseman)

Luis Antonio Castillo (born September 12, 1975) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman. Castillo is a three-time All-Star, three-time Gold Glove winner, and won the World Series with the Florida Marlins in 2003. He is also the only player who played for the Marlins in both of their World Series winning seasons who did not get traded in between the two seasons.

Marty Barrett (second baseman)

For the 19th-century baseball catcher, see Marty Barrett (catcher).

Martin Glenn Barrett (born June 23, 1958) is an American former Major League Baseball second baseman, who played for the Boston Red Sox (1982–1990) and San Diego Padres (1991).

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