Seaman

Seaman may refer to:

See also

Able seaman

An able seaman (AB) is a naval rating of the deck department of a merchant ship with more than two years' experience at sea and considered "well acquainted with his duty". An AB may work as a watchstander, a day worker, or a combination of these roles. Once a sufficient amount of sea time is acquired, then the AB can apply to take a series of courses/examinations to become certified as an officer.

Comparative navy enlisted ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of enlisted rank for navies of African states.

Comparative navy enlisted ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of navies of Asian states.

Comparative navy enlisted ranks of Europe

Rank comparison chart of all navies of European states.

Some European countries do not have naval forces, either because they are landlocked Austria, Belarus, the Czech Republic, Moldova, Luxembourg, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo, Slovakia, San Marino and the Vatican (enclaves with Italy), or naval duties provided by another state such as Monaco (provided by France), .

The Cyprus Navy is the naval branch of the Cypriot National Guard.

NATO has a scheme for comparative ranks for member countries, non-NATO countries equivalence is determined against this system.

Comparative navy enlisted ranks of the Americas

Rank comparison chart of navies of North and South American states.

Comparative navy enlisted ranks of the Commonwealth

Rank comparison chart of naval forces of Commonwealth of Nations states.

David Seaman

David Andrew Seaman, MBE (born 19 September 1963) is an English former footballer who played as a goalkeeper. In a career lasting from 1981 to 2004, he is best known for his time playing for Arsenal. He won 75 caps for the England national football team, and is the country's second-most capped goalkeeper, after Peter Shilton. In 1997 was awarded the MBE for services to football.

The peak of Seaman's career was during his period as Arsenal and England goalkeeper in the 1990s and early 2000s. During his time at Arsenal he won three league championships (1991, 1998, 2002), four FA Cups (1993, 1998, 2002, 2003), the League Cup in 1993 and the European Cup Winners Cup in 1994. During this time he also played for England in the 1998 and 2002 FIFA World Cups, and Euro 96 and Euro 2000. As well as Arsenal, he also played in the Premier League for Manchester City, as well as making appearances in the Football League for Peterborough United, Birmingham City and Queens Park Rangers.

His save from Paul Peschisolido of Sheffield United in the 2002–03 FA Cup was described as one of the best ever. Notable lows came with two costly errors, both from long-range efforts—conceding a last-minute goal in the 1995 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Final to Nayim and conceding to a Ronaldinho free-kick in the 2002 FIFA World Cup quarter-final.Seaman is left-handed, but threw the ball with his right arm and kicked with his right foot. He retired in 2004 due to a recurring shoulder injury.

In June 2012, he was appointed goalkeeping coach of Combined Counties League club Wembley.

Leading seaman

Leading Seaman is a junior non-commissioned rank or rate in navies, particularly those of the Commonwealth. When it is used by NATO nations, Leading Seaman has the rank code of OR-4. It is often equivalent to the army and air force rank of corporal and some navies use Corporal rather than Leading Seaman.

The rank is used in the navies of Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Finland, Ghana, India, Ireland, Namibia, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom.

Merchant navy

A merchant navy or merchant marine is the fleet of merchant vessels that are registered in a specific country. On merchant vessels, seafarers of various ranks and sometimes members of maritime trade unions are required by the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) to carry Merchant Mariner's Documents.

King George V bestowed the title of the "Merchant Navy" on the British merchant shipping fleets following their service in the First World War; since then a number of other nations have also adopted use of that title or the similar "Merchant Marine." The following is a partial list of the merchant navies or merchant marines of various countries. In many countries the fleet's proper name is simply the capitalized version of the common noun ("Merchant Navy").

Nellie Bly

Elizabeth Cochran Seaman (May 5, 1864 – January 27, 1922), better known by her pen name, Nellie Bly, was an American journalist who was widely known for her record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, in emulation of Jules Verne's fictional character Phileas Fogg, and an exposé in which she worked undercover to report on a mental institution from within. She was a pioneer in her field, and launched a new kind of investigative journalism. Bly was also a writer, industrialist, inventor, and a charity worker.

Ordinary seaman

An ordinary seaman (OS) is a naval rating of the deck department of a ship. The position is an apprenticeship to become an able seaman, and has been for centuries. In modern times, an OS is required to work on a ship for a specific amount of time, gaining what is referred to as "sea time". For centuries, the term ordinary seaman was used to refer to a seaman with between one and two years' experience at sea, who showed enough seamanship to be so rated by their captain.An OS is generally not required to stand watch, but must pass examinations on watchstanding skills such as performing lookout duty and being a helmsman. Thus an OS will often be found on a ship's bridge after working hours taking a turn at the ship's wheel or being familiarized with bridge equipment.

During the apprenticeship, an OS performs a variety of duties concerned with the operation and upkeep of deck department areas and equipment. These duties vary with the type of ship, the type of voyage, the number of crewmembers, the weather, the supervisor, and any number of other variables. However, in most cases, one can expect an ordinary seaman to clean, to perform maintenance, to work with deck equipment, and to undergo on-the-job-training under the supervision of senior deck department members.

Private Snafu

Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional adult cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945 during World War II. The films were designed to instruct service personnel about security, proper sanitation habits, booby traps and other military subjects, and to improve troop morale. Primarily, they demonstrate the negative consequences of doing things wrong. The main character's name is a play on the military slang acronym SNAFU, "Situation Normal: All Fouled Up."

The series was directed by Chuck Jones and other prominent Hollywood animators, and the voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc.

Ranks and insignia of NATO navies enlisted

This table shows the ranks and insignia of NCOs and Seaman in the navies of member countries of NATO. NATO maintains a "standard rank scale" in an attempt to match every member country's military rank to corresponding ranks used by the other members. The rank categories were established in the document STANAG 2116, formally titled NATO Codes for Grades of Military Personnel.

STA-21

STA-21 or Seaman to Admiral - 21 is the U.S. Navy's commissioning program for the 21st century and is designed to enable active-duty sailors to get a college degree and become commissioned officers.

Sailor

A sailor, seaman, mariner, or seafarer is a person who works aboard a watercraft as part of its crew, and may work in any one in a number of different fields that are related to the operation and maintenance of a ship.

The profession of the sailor is old, and the term sailor has its etymological roots in a time when sailing ships were the main mode of transport at sea, but it now refers to the personnel of all watercraft regardless of the mode of transport, and encompasses people who operate ships professionally or recreationally, be it for a military navy or civilian merchant navy. In a navy, there may be further distinctions: sailor may refer to any member of the navy even if they are based on land; while seaman may refer to a specific enlisted rank.

Seaman (rank)

Seaman is a military rank used in many navies around the world. It is considered a junior enlisted rank and, depending on the navy, it may be a single rank on its own or a name shared by several similarly-junior ranks.

In the Commonwealth, it is the lowest rank in the navy, while in the United States, it refers to the three lowest ranks of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard. The equivalent of the seaman is the matelot in French-speaking countries, and Matrose in German-speaking countries.

Seaman apprentice

Seaman apprentice is the second lowest enlisted rate in the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps just above seaman recruit and below seaman; this rank was formerly known as seaman second class.

The actual title for an E-2 in the U.S. Navy varies based on the community to which the sailor belongs. Likewise, the color of their group rate marks also depends on their community.

Those in the general deck and administrative community are seamen apprentice. They wear white stripes on navy blue uniforms, and navy blue (black) stripes on white uniforms.

Hospital corpsmen are hospitalmen apprentice. They are the only rate in this community. They wear white stripes on navy blue uniforms, and navy blue stripes on white uniforms.

Those in the engineering and hull community are called firemen apprentice and wear red stripes on both navy blue and white uniforms.

Those in the aviation community are called airmen apprentice and wear green stripes on both navy blue and white uniforms.

Seabees are called constructionmen apprentice and wear light blue stripes on both navy blue and white uniforms.No stripes are worn on the working uniforms - coveralls or utilities.

In October 2005, the dental technician rating was merged with the hospital corpsman rating, eliminating the dentalman apprentice title. Those who once held the rank of dentalman apprentice have instead become hospitalman apprentices.

Sailors who have completed the requirements to be assigned a rating and have been accepted by the Bureau of Naval Personnel as holding that rating (a process called "striking") are called designated strikers, and are called by their full rate and rating in formal communications (i.e., "machinist's mate fireman apprentice", as opposed to simply "fireman apprentice"), though the rating is often left off in informal communication. Those who have not officially been assigned to a rating are officially referred to as "undesignated" or "non-rates."

Sinbad the Sailor

Sinbad (or Sindbad) the Sailor (Arabic: السندباد البحري‎, translit. as-Sindibādu al-Baḥriyy) is a fictional mariner and the hero of a story-cycle of Middle Eastern origin. He is described as hailing from Baghdad during the early Abbasid Caliphate (8th and 9th centuries CE). In the course of seven voyages throughout the seas east of Africa and south of Asia, he has fantastic adventures in magical realms, encountering monsters and witnessing supernatural phenomena.

Tim Seaman

Timothy "Tim" M. Seaman (born May 14, 1972) is an American race walker who competed at the 2000 and 2004 Olympics.Seaman made a habit of winning the 5000 metres racewalk at the USA Indoor Track and Field Championships. He won the event 13-times winning consecutive years from 1998-2007, and in 2009, 2010 and 2013. His 13 USA Indoor titles rank highest in the sport’s history. Seaman is also seven-time USA 20 km champion, winning in 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2009 and 2014. [1] On April 20, 2004, he set the still standing American record in the 10-km walk at 39:22.7 in Storetveitmarsje, Norway.

As a collegiate athlete, Seaman was a four-time National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) race walk champion while competing for the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. [2]

Seaman is currently the cross country, women's track and field and distance running coach for Cuyamaca College. His wife Rachel Seaman is also an Olympic racewalker.

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