Scottish Football Association

The Scottish Football Association (also known as the SFA and the Scottish FA; Scottish Gaelic: Comann Ball-coise na h-Alba; Scots: Scots Fitbaw Association) is the governing body of football in Scotland and has the ultimate responsibility for the control and development of football in Scotland. Members of the SFA include clubs in Scotland, affiliated national associations as well as local associations. It was formed in 1873, making it the second oldest national football association in the world. It is not to be confused with the Scottish Football Union, which is the name that the SRU was known by until the 1920s.

The Scottish Football Association sits on the International Football Association Board which is responsible for the laws of the game. The SFA is also a member of FIFA and founder member of UEFA. It is based at Hampden Park in Glasgow. In addition, the Scottish Football Museum is located there.

The Scottish Football Association is responsible for the operation of the Scotland national football team, the annual Scottish Cup and several other duties important to the functioning of the game in Scotland.

Scottish Football Association
UEFA
Scottish Football Association Logo
Founded13 March 1873
HeadquartersGlasgow[1]
FIFA affiliation
  • 1910–1920
  • 1924–1928
  • 1946–present
UEFA affiliation1954
IFAB affiliation1886
PresidentAlan McRae[2]
Vice-PresidentRod Petrie
Websitehttps://www.scottishfa.co.uk/

History

Scottish Football Association
Logo used until 30 November 2012[3]

Following the formation of Scotland's earliest football clubs in the 1860s, football experienced a rapid growth but there was no formal structure, and matches were often arranged in a haphazard and irregular fashion.

Queen's Park, a Glasgow club founded in 1867, took the lead, and following an advertisement in a Glasgow newspaper in 1873, representatives from seven clubs – Queen's Park, Clydesdale, Vale of Leven, Dumbreck, Third Lanark, Eastern and Granville – attended a meeting on 13 March 1873. Furthermore, Kilmarnock sent a letter stating their willingness to join.

That day, these eight clubs formed the Scottish Football Association, and resolved that:

The clubs here represented form themselves into an association for the promotion of football according to the rules of The Football Association and that the clubs connected with this association subscribe for a challenge cup to be played for annually, the committee to propose the laws of the competition.[4]

Chief executive

The chief executive of the Scottish Football Association oversees the development of football in Scotland and the administration of disciplinary matters, and is also responsible for the general organisation of the national side. One of the most prominent roles of the chief executive is to hire and dismiss Scotland national football team managers.[5]

There have been nine chief executives since 1882:[6]

National teams

As well as the Scotland national football team, the Scottish Football Association is also currently responsible for organising the Scotland B national football team, as well as men's national teams at under-21, under-19, under-18 and under-17 levels. There was also a semi-professional team, but this was disbanded in 2008.[12] In women's football, there is the full Scotland women's national football team, under-19 and under-17 teams.

Club competitions

The Scottish Football Association organises the Scottish Cup and the Scottish Youth Cup. Although the SFA are not involved in the day-to-day operation of the Scottish Professional Football League or other league competitions, they do appoint referees to officiate the games in these leagues, as well as dealing with player registrations and disciplinary issues.[4]

Club licensing

The Scottish Football Association encourages quality of governance in football clubs through a system of club licence awards. All SFA member clubs are assessed annually in four areas (ground, first team, youth team, and governance) and, if appropriate, awarded a licence at platinum, gold, silver, bronze or entry level. As of July 2019[13], only Celtic have been awarded a platinum-level licence, while three clubs have been awarded gold-level licences: Hibernian, St Johnstone and St Mirren. All clubs in the Scottish Professional Football League, Highland Football League, and Lowland Football League are required to be licensed at entry level or above.

Member clubs

As of July 2019[13], 98 clubs are full members of the Scottish Football Association, comprising:

Affiliated associations

National associations

The Scottish Football Association has affiliated to it the following six national associations:

Local associations

The following nine local associations are affiliated:

References

  1. ^ "Contact Us - Scottish Football Association - Scottish FA". www.scottishfa.co.uk.
  2. ^ "Record Turnover announced at Scottish FA AGM". www.scottishfa.co.uk. Scottish Football Association. 9 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  3. ^ James Shaw [@JGBS] (30 November 2012). "James Shaw" (Tweet). Retrieved 19 May 2017 – via Twitter.
  4. ^ a b "Brief History of the Scottish Football Association". Scottish Football Association. Archived from the original on 1 July 2008. Retrieved 6 December 2013.
  5. ^ "New SFA chief ready to take flak". BBC Sport. 1 June 2007. Retrieved 6 June 2007.
  6. ^ "Gordon Smith appointed chief executive". Scottish Football Association. Archived from the original on 19 July 2007. Retrieved 6 June 2007.
  7. ^ "SFA chief executive Gordon Smith steps down from role". BBC Sport. 19 April 2010. Retrieved 19 April 2010.
  8. ^ "Regan named new Scottish FA chief executive". BBC Sport. 28 July 2010. Retrieved 30 October 2010.
  9. ^ "Scotland: Stewart Regan steps down as SFA chief executive". BBC Sport. 1 February 2018. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  10. ^ "Ian Maxwell appointed as Chief Executive". Scottish Football Association. 23 April 2018. Retrieved 23 April 2018.
  11. ^ McLauchlin, Brian (8 May 2018). "Scottish FA & SPFL merger not likely, says Andrew McKinlay". BBC Sport. BBC. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  12. ^ "SFA pulls the plug on Scots semi-pro team". The Scotsman. Johnston Publishing. 7 November 2008. Retrieved 18 November 2013.
  13. ^ a b "Licensed Clubs - July 2019" (PDF). Scottish FA. Retrieved 1 July 2019.

External links

Clydesdale F.C.

Clydesdale F.C. were a nineteenth-century Glasgow-based football club, who were attached to Clydesdale Cricket Club during the 1870s. In 1873, Clydesdale was one of the teams to found the Scottish Football Association.

Clydesdale played in blue and orange hoops. The club played at the cricket club's ground at Kinning Park, and moved with the cricket club to Titwood in 1876.

With Scottish international players Frederick Anderson, John McPherson, James J Lang, James Tassie Richmond in the forward line, David Wotherspoon in defence and Robert W Gardner as captain and goalkeeper, Clydesdale were at one time the only team to give Queen's Park a good game and were in 1874 the team that broke Queen's Park's immaculate goal concession record. Clydesdale were strong enough to trounce Notts County 6–0.

Clydesdale reached the first Scottish Cup final, in 1874, but lost 2–0 to Queen's Park. The Clydesdale 1874 Scottish Cup finalists were:

Goalkeeper Robert W Gardner (Capt)

Defenders David Wotherspoon, James McArly

Midfielders A. H. Raeburn, Ebenezer Hendry

Forwards Frederick Anderson, William Gibb, James R. Wilson, James J. Lang, John McPherson, and J. Kennedy.

From then on, Clydesdale's on-the-pitch fortunes gradually faded until the football club was discontinued. The club had become bankrupt by the turn of the century, but the cricket and hockey teams continue. Several attempts have been made at reviving the club as a junior team.

Dumbreck F.C.

Dumbreck Football Club were a 19th-century football club based in Glasgow that were one of the original 16 teams to participate in the inaugural season of the Scottish Cup. They were one of the eight founder members of the Scottish Football Association.Dumbreck played in blue shirts with white shorts, and played in Ibroxhill.Dumbreck participated in Scottish Cup tournaments between 1873–74 and 1877–78, reaching the quarter-finals on one occasion. They dissolved in 1879.During its relatively short time, Dumbreck provided Scotland with one of its early internationalists, Alex McGeoch, who represented Scotland on four occasions.Dumbreck were the opposition for Queen's Park on 25 October 1873 for the first match played at Hampden Park.

Eastern F.C.

Eastern Football Club was a 19th-century football club based in Glasgow, Scotland. They were one of the founder members of the Scottish Football Association (SFA) and one of the sixteen teams to participate in the inaugural season of the Scottish Cup.

Football in Scotland

Association football is one of the national sports of Scotland and the most popular sport in the country. There is a long tradition of "football" games in Orkney, Lewis and southern Scotland, especially the Scottish Borders, although many of these include carrying the ball and passing by hand, and despite bearing the name "football" bear little resemblance to association football.Founded in 1873, Scotland has the second oldest national Football Association in the world (behind England's FA), and the trophy for the national cup, the Scottish Cup, is the oldest national sporting trophy in the world. Scotland and Scottish football clubs hold many records for football attendances.

List of Scotland international footballers

The Scotland national football team is the joint-oldest international football team, having played in the first official international match, a goalless draw on 30 November 1872 against England. Since then, the team has established a long-standing rivalry with England, particularly in the annual British Home Championship, which Scotland won 24 times outright and shared a further 17 times. The team has enjoyed less success in continental and global competition. Even though Scotland has participated in eight FIFA World Cup and two UEFA European Championship final tournaments, the team has never progressed beyond the first round of any major tournament.Kenny Dalglish, the only man to have won more than 100 caps for Scotland, was the only Scottish player named in the FIFA 100. Denis Law, who shares with Dalglish the record for the most goals scored for the national team, is the only Scottish player to have won the European Footballer of the Year award.This list includes all players with 25 or more appearances for the national team. When a player reaches that landmark, they are presented with a commemorative medal. The Scottish Football Association also maintains a roll of honour for players who have won at least 50 caps. This distinction was launched in March 1998, when 11 players had already achieved that mark.

List of Scotland international footballers (1–4 caps)

The Scotland national football team is the joint-oldest international football team, having played in the first official international match, a goalless draw on 30 November 1872 against England. Since then, the team has established a long-standing rivalry with England, particularly in the annual British Home Championship, which Scotland won 24 times outright and shared a further 17 times. The team has enjoyed less success in continental and global competition. Even though Scotland has participated in eight FIFA World Cup and two UEFA European Championship final tournaments, the team has never progressed beyond the first round of any major tournament.Kenny Dalglish, the only man to have won more than 100 caps for Scotland, was the only Scottish player named in the FIFA 100. Denis Law, who shares with Dalglish the record for the most goals scored for the national team, is the only Scottish player to have won the European Footballer of the Year award. The Scottish Football Association maintains a roll of honour for players who have won at least 50 caps. This distinction was launched in March 1998, when 11 players had already achieved that mark.This list includes all Scotland players who have made 4 appearances or less for the national team.

List of Scotland international footballers (5–24 caps)

The Scotland national football team is the joint-oldest international football team, having played in the first official international match, a goalless draw on 30 November 1872 against England. Since then, the team has established a long-standing rivalry with England, particularly in the annual British Home Championship, which Scotland won 24 times outright and shared a further 17 times. The team has enjoyed less success in continental and global competition. Even though Scotland has participated in eight FIFA World Cup and two UEFA European Championship final tournaments, the team has never progressed beyond the first round of any major tournament.Kenny Dalglish, the only man to have won more than 100 caps for Scotland, was the only Scottish player named in the FIFA 100. Denis Law, who shares with Dalglish the record for the most goals scored for the national team, is the only Scottish player to have won the European Footballer of the Year award. The Scottish Football Association maintains a roll of honour for players who have won at least 50 caps. This distinction was launched in March 1998, when 11 players had already achieved that mark.This list includes all players with between 5 and 24 appearances for the national team.

List of Scotland women's international footballers

The Scotland women's national football team represents Scotland in international women's football competitions. Since 1998, the team has been governed by the Scottish Football Association (SFA). Scotland qualified in the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, and qualified for their first UEFA Women's Euro in 2017.

This list includes all players who have made at least one appearance for the national team. In July 2017, the SFA launched the Women's International Roll of Honour, which recognises players who have won 100 or more caps for the national team. The women's roll of honour initially included 12 players.

Mark Wotte

Mark Christian Wotte (born 16 December 1960 in Enschede, Overijssel) is a football player and manager from the Netherlands. Wotte has managed teams in the Netherlands, Egypt, Qatar, England and Romania, and has also worked for the Scottish Football Association.

Scotland national under-16 football team

The Scotland national under-16 football team represents Scotland in international football at the under-16 age level. It is controlled by the Scottish Football Association, the governing body for football in Scotland. The coach is Dean Gorré.The Scotland under-16s' best tournament performance was as runners up in the 1989 FIFA U-16 World Championship under manager Craig Brown. Despite leading Saudi Arabia 2–0 in the final after goals from Ian Downie and Paul Dickov, the match finished 2–2 after extra time. Scotland lost the subsequent penalty shoot-out in front of over 50,000 fans at Hampden Park in Glasgow. Some media commentators reported suspicions, which were shared by Craig Brown and former Scottish Football Association secretary Ernie Walker, that Saudi Arabia had fielded ineligible over-age players in the competition.

Scotland national under-17 football team

The Scotland national under-17 football team, controlled by the Scottish Football Association, is Scotland's national Under-17 football team and is considered to be a feeder team for the Scotland national football team. The team represents Scotland in international Under-17 competitions such as the U-17 World Cup and the European U-17 Championship.

The team has qualified for five European Championship final tournaments, in 2008, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017. The team achieved its best result in 2014 by progressing to the semi-final.

Scotland national under-19 football team

The Scotland national under-19 football team is the national football team representing Scotland for players of 19 years of age or under at the start of a European Under-19 Football Championship campaign. The team, which is controlled by the Scottish Football Association, acts as a feeder team to the Scotland national football team.

Scotland women's national football team 2010–19 results

This article lists the results and fixtures for the Scotland women's national football team from 2010 to 2019.

Scottish Cup

The Scottish Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the Scottish Cup (Scots: Scots Cup; Scottish Gaelic: Cupa na h-Alba), is an annual association football knock-out cup competition for men's football clubs in Scotland. The competition was first held in 1873–74. Entry is open to all 89 clubs with full membership of the Scottish Football Association (SFA), along with up to eight other clubs who are associate members. The competition is called the William Hill Scottish Cup for sponsorship reasons.Although it is the second oldest competition in association football history, after the FA Cup, the Scottish Cup trophy is the oldest in association football and is also the oldest national trophy in the world. It was first presented to Queen's Park, who won the final match of the inaugural tournament in March 1874. The current holders are Celtic, who won the tournament for a 39th time by defeating Hearts 2–1 in the 2019 final.

Scottish FA Women's International Roll of Honour

The Scottish FA Women's International Roll of Honour is a list established by the Scottish Football Association recognising women players who have gained 100 or more international caps for Scotland. The roll of honour was launched in 2017, when 12 players had already achieved the distinction. Since then, Rachel Corsie (2018) and Hayley Lauder (2019) have also passed the 100-appearance milestone.

Scottish Junior Football Association

The Scottish Junior Football Association (SJFA) is an affiliated national association of the Scottish Football Association and is the governing body for the junior grade of football in Scotland. The term "junior" refers to the level of football played, not the age of the players. The closest equivalent terminology would be non-League football in England, the difference being that non-league football in Scotland is not similarly integrated into its football league system. Founded in 1886, the SJFA is responsible for disciplinary matters within the grade, certain player registration procedures and organising the annual Scottish Junior Cup. Other league and cup competitions are organised by three regional committees. The association headquarters are at Hampden Park, Glasgow, which is Scotland's national football stadium. There was an earlier Scottish Junior FA, which was founded in Glasgow in October 1880. This body also ran a Scottish Junior Cup competition during 1880–81 season but appears to have disbanded at the end of that season.

Scottish Qualifying Cup

The Scottish Qualifying Cup was a football competition played in Scotland between 1895 and 2007. During that time, apart from a brief spell in the 1950s, it was the only way for non-league teams to qualify for the Scottish Cup. The Qualifying Cup was open to all full member clubs of the Scottish Football Association, who were not members of the Scottish Premier League or Scottish Football League. In June 2007 the Scottish Football Association announced a new format for the Scottish Cup from season 2007–08 that would allow all full member clubs direct entry into the competition and consequently the Qualifying Cup competition was scrapped.

Scottish Welfare Football Association

The Scottish Welfare Football Association (SWFA) is an affiliated association of the Scottish Football Association. It was formed at the end of the First World War to boost morale among factory workers. Historically, over 500 clubs competed in Welfare competitions; however, this has dwindled over the years to fewer than 200 currently. The association oversees competitions mainly operating Sunday and summer or midweek football, predominantly in the North of Scotland.

Scottish Women's Football

Scottish Women's Football (SWF), formerly the Scottish Women’s Football Association (SWFA), is the governing body for women's association football in Scotland, and an affiliated national association of the Scottish Football Association (SFA). The SWFA was founded in 1972, when four teams met and decided to form an Association.This association consists of:

A senior league - including one national league, and divisional leagues.

U13 and U16 leagues in various parts of Scotland.

Development centres open to girls at different age groups nationwide.

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See also

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