Scott Tolzien

Scott Jeffery Tolzien (born September 4, 1987) is a former American football quarterback. He played college football at Wisconsin. He was signed by the San Diego Chargers as an undrafted free agent in 2011. He has also played for the San Francisco 49ers, Green Bay Packers and Indianapolis Colts. On November 27, he was drafted by the Birmingham Iron in the 2019 AAF QB Draft.[1]

Scott Tolzien
refer to caption
Tolzien with the Colts in 2016
No. 3, 16
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:September 4, 1987 (age 31)
Rolling Meadows, Illinois
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:215 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Palatine (IL) Fremd
College:Wisconsin
Undrafted:2011
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Passing attempts:146
Passing completions:88
Completion percentage:60.3
TDINT:2–9
Passing yards:1,065
Passer rating:61.6
Player stats at NFL.com

High school career

Tolzien was a two-star recruit out of William Fremd High School, located in Palatine, Illinois, a suburb northwest of Chicago.[2] He made official visits to the University of Kentucky and the University of Toledo, but he did not attract many offers from major universities. He chose to attend the University of Wisconsin–Madison.[3]

College career

Tolzien attended and played college football for the University of Wisconsin from 2006–2010.[4]

2006 season

As a true freshman at Wisconsin in 2006, Tolzien was redshirted and did not play.

2007 season

Scott Tolzien and Dustin Sherer in 2007
Tolzien (center) listens to the offensive coordinator with fellow Wisconsin quarterback Dustin Sherer (#18) in 2007

Tolzien did not play in any games for Wisconsin in 2007, as Wisconsin had Tyler Donovan, Allan Evridge, and Dustin Sherer at quarterback.[5]

2008 season

After Allan Evridge was benched following his performances against Michigan, Ohio State, and Penn State, Tolzien saw his first major action for Wisconsin against Iowa in Kinnick Stadium. He completed 5 passes on 8 attempts, but threw an interception in the red zone.[6] Dustin Sherer eventually took charge of the Badgers, who finished the season 7–6.[7]

2009 season

Scott Tolzien 2009.jpeg
Tolzien huddles in 2009

The winner of a spring quarterback competition, Tolzien beat out starter Sherer in 2009. He set the Wisconsin record for completions in a single season, with 211, and passed for 2,705 yards.[8] Under Tolzien's leadership, Wisconsin finished the season at 9–3.[9] He threw a pair of interceptions that were returned for touchdowns in a loss at Ohio State and threw three interceptions against Iowa the following week.[10][11] Despite this, Tolzien was at the top of his game in games against Michigan, Minnesota, and Michigan State, and was named Big Ten Offensive Player of the Week for his efforts against Michigan State.[12][13][14]

Tolzien finished the 2009 season in a 20–14 win over Miami in the Champs Sports Bowl, completing 19 passes on 26 attempts as the Badgers knocked off the higher-ranked Hurricanes.[15]

2010 season

After a disappointing effort against Michigan State in which the Badger receiving corps dropped several passes, Tolzien improved week after week as the Badgers won their next 7 games, to finish the year 11–1.[16][17] Against a top 5 Ohio State defense, Tolzien completed 13 of 16 passes. His efforts led the Badgers to an eventual upset of then top-ranked Ohio State.[18] The next week against Iowa, Tolzien again had a solid game, completing 20 passes on 26 attempts for 205 yards and a touchdown. Most impressively, Tolzien led the Badgers down the field for the game-winning touchdown with Wisconsin's running game stifled by Iowa's defense.[19] In his final home start, against the Northwestern Wildcats, Tolzien was nearly flawless, completing 15 passes on 19 attempts for 230 yards with four touchdown passes.[20]

Tolzien made his final collegiate start at Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl against one of the top defenses in the nation, TCU. He finished the game with 12 completions out of 21 attempts for 159 yards, no touchdowns and no interceptions and a rating of 120.7 for the game, and the Horned Frogs won, 21–19. Tolzein completed his college career at the East-West Shrine Game on January 22, 2011.[21]

Tolzien won the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award in 2010, edging out finalists Andy Dalton of TCU, Colin Kaepernick of Nevada, Christian Ponder of Florida State, and Ricky Stanzi of Iowa,[22][23] He smashed the Wisconsin record for completion percentage in a season in his remarkable 2010 season, completing 74.3% of his passes in 12 regular season games. Tolzien ranked 4th nationally in passer rating, and led the nation in completion percentage.

Statistics

The following statistics were retrieved from Sports-Reference.com.[24]

Collegiate career statistics
Wisconsin Badgers
Season Games Games
started
Record Passing Rushing
Comp Att Yards Pct. TD Int QB rating Att Yards Avg TD
2006
Redshirt
2007
Did not play
2008 3 0 0–0 5 8 107 62.5 0 1 149.9 4 13 3.3 1
2009 13 13 10–3 211 328 2,705 64.3 16 11 143.0 54 8 0.1 2
2010 13 13 11–2 194 266 2,459 72.9 16 6 165.9 30 –30 –1.0 0
NCAA Career Totals 29 26 21–5 410 602 5,271 68.1 32 18 153.2 88 –9 –0.1 3

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad Wonderlic
6 ft 2 in
(1.88 m)
212 lb
(96 kg)
30 12 in
(0.77 m)
10 in
(0.25 m)
4.93 s 1.79 s 2.96 s 4.12 s 6.84 s 29.5 in
(0.75 m)
9 ft 8 in
(2.95 m)
38[25]
All values are from NFL Combine[26][27]

San Diego Chargers

After going undrafted in the 2011 NFL Draft, Tolzien signed with the San Diego Chargers on July 26, 2011.[28] He threw for 302 yards, one touchdown, and one interception in the preseason.[29] On September 3, 2011, Tolzien was released by the Chargers during final team cuts.[30]

San Francisco 49ers

Scott Tolzien in 2012
Tolzien with the 49ers in 2012

On September 4, 2011, Tolzien was claimed off waivers by the San Francisco 49ers. He became the 49ers third-string quarterback behind starter Alex Smith and backup Colin Kaepernick. He remained with San Francisco after the conclusion of the 2012 preseason, still slotted as the team's third-string quarterback. He was on the roster for the 49ers appearance in Super Bowl XLVII. On August 26, 2013, Tolzien was waived by the 49ers.[31]

Green Bay Packers

Tolzien was signed to the Green Bay Packers practice squad on September 1, 2013.[32] After Aaron Rodgers suffered a clavicle injury, the Packers brought him up from the practice squad to the active roster. On November 10, 2013, Tolzien entered a game after an early injury to Rodgers's backup Seneca Wallace.[33]

Scott Tolzien in 2014
Tolzien with the Packers in 2014

In his regular season debut, Tolzien completed 24-of-39 attempts for 280 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions in a 27–13 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles, earning him the start in the Packers' next game against the New York Giants.[34] Against the Giants, Tolzien was 24 of 34 and threw for 339 yards, but also threw 3 interceptions in a 27–13 loss.[35] After the game, head coach Mike McCarthy remarked that he had never seen anyone hit every shot he took down field, having been five-for-five on plays of 25 yards or longer. The next week against the Vikings, Tolzien performed a spin move during a touchdown run before being relieved by quarterback Matt Flynn who led the Packers to a 26–26 tie against their divisional rival.[36][37][38]

In the 2015 season, he appeared in three games for the Packers and had very limited roles.[39]

Indianapolis Colts

On March 11, 2016, Tolzien signed a two-year contract with the Indianapolis Colts worth $3.50 million with $500,000 guaranteed.[40][41] Due to a concussion to Andrew Luck, Tolzien made his first start for the Colts on Thanksgiving on November 24, 2016, throwing for 205 yards, one touchdown, and two interceptions in a 28–7 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.[42]

With Luck being inactive due to a shoulder injury, Tolzien was named the starting quarterback to begin the 2017 season. On September 10, 2017, he started the season opener against the Los Angeles Rams. Tolzien had 128 passing yards with two interceptions returned for touchdowns, until being benched in favor for Jacoby Brissett. The Colts lost by a score of 46–9.[43] Brissett started the next game against the Arizona Cardinals with Tolzien as the backup. After being benched, Tolzien had no more action in 2017. At the end of the year the Colts elected not to renew his contract, becoming a free agent.[44]

Birmingham Iron

On November 27, 2018, Tolzien was selected by the Birmingham Iron of the Alliance of American Football in the third round of the 2019 AAF QB Draft.[45]

Tolzien never played a down for the Iron as he retired before training camp began.[46]

Statistics

Season Passing Rushing Fumbles
Year Team G GS Comp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rate Att Yds Avg TD Fum Lost
2013 GB 3 2 55 90 61.1 717 8.0 1 5 66.8 5 55 11.0 1 0 0
2015 GB 3 0 1 1 100.0 4.0 4 0 0 83.3 3 −3 −1.0 0 1 0
2016 IND 3 1 23 37 62.2 216 5.8 1 2 64.7 6 3 0.5 0 1 0
2017 IND 1 1 9 18 50 128 7.1 0 2 33.8 2 2 1.0 0 1 0
Total[47] 10 4 88 146 60.3 1,065 7.3 2 9 61.6 16 57 3.6 1 3 0

[48]

References

  1. ^ "Christian Hackenberg, Scott Tolzien among 32 QBs allocated by new AAF". ESPN.
  2. ^ LeGere, Bob. "Fremd product Scott Tolzien signs with Indianapolis Colts". Daily Herald. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  3. ^ "9 things you need to know about new Packers quarterback Scott Tolzien". USA Today.
  4. ^ "Scott Tolzien College Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  5. ^ "2007 Wisconsin Badgers Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  6. ^ "Wisconsin at Iowa Box Score, October 18, 2008". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  7. ^ "2008 Wisconsin Badgers Schedule and Results". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  8. ^ "Scott Tolzien 2009 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  9. ^ "2009 Wisconsin Badgers Schedule and Results". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  10. ^ "Wisconsin at Ohio State Box Score, October 10, 2009". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  11. ^ "Iowa at Wisconsin Box Score, October 17, 2009". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  12. ^ "Michigan at Wisconsin Box Score, November 14, 2009". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  13. ^ "Wisconsin at Minnesota Box Score, October 3, 2009". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  14. ^ "Michigan State at Wisconsin Box Score, September 26, 2009". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  15. ^ "Champs Sports Bowl - Wisconsin vs Miami (FL) Box Score, December 29, 2009". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  16. ^ "Wisconsin at Michigan State Box Score, October 2, 2010". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  17. ^ "2010 Wisconsin Badgers Schedule and Results". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  18. ^ "Ohio State at Wisconsin Box Score, October 16, 2010". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  19. ^ "Wisconsin at Iowa Box Score, October 23, 2010". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  20. ^ "Northwestern at Wisconsin Box Score, November 27, 2010". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  21. ^ "Tolzien to play in 86th East-West Shrine Game".
  22. ^ "Tolzien named finalist for Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award".
  23. ^ "Scott Tolzien wins Unitas Golden Arm Award".
  24. ^ "Scott Tolzien Stats - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved July 29, 2016.
  25. ^ McGinn, Bob (April 16, 2011). "State NFL draft prospects". JSOnline.com. Archived from the original on April 20, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  26. ^ "NFL Events: Combine Player Profiles - Scott Tolzien". NFL.com. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  27. ^ "Scott Tolzien - Wisconsin, QB : 2011 NFL Draft Scout Player Profile". NFLDraftScout.com. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  28. ^ "Chargers reach agreement with college FAs". Chargers.com. July 26, 2011. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  29. ^ "Scott Tolzien: 2011 Game Logs". NFL.com. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  30. ^ "Chargers cut roster to 53". Chargers.com. September 3, 2011. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  31. ^ Price, Taylor (August 23, 2013). "49ers waive five players". 49ers.com. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  32. ^ Wesseling, Chris (September 1, 2013). "Practice squad roundup: Greg McElroy Bengal-bound". National Football League. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  33. ^ Hanzus, Dan (November 5, 2013). "Scott Tolzien activated to Packers' 53-man roster". NFL. Archived from the original on September 8, 2015.
  34. ^ Breech, John (November 10, 2013). "Packers QB Scott Tolzien will start in Week 11 vs. Giants". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on June 10, 2015.
  35. ^ "Green Bay Packers at New York Giants - November 17th, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  36. ^ "Scott Tolzien will start for Packers in Week 12 vs. Vikes".
  37. ^ Pelissero, Tom (November 24, 2013). "Matt Flynn helps Packers salvage 26-26 tie with Vikings". USA Today.
  38. ^ "Minnesota Vikings at Green Bay Packers - November 24th, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  39. ^ "Scott Tolzien 2015 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  40. ^ Wesseling, Chris (March 11, 2016). "Indianapolis Colts sign former Packers QB Scott Tolzien". NFL.com. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  41. ^ Spotrac.com. "Scott Tolzien". Spotrac.com. Retrieved March 26, 2016.
  42. ^ "Pittsburgh Steelers at Indianapolis Colts - November 24th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  43. ^ Bergman, Jeremy. "Scott Tolzien has lousy start as Colts fall to Rams". NFL. Retrieved September 10, 2017.
  44. ^ "Scott Tolzien 2017 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  45. ^ Crabtree, Curtis (November 27, 2018). "Christian Hackenberg, Scott Tolzien, Zach Mettenberger selected in AAF quarterback draft". Profootballtalk.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  46. ^ Birmingham Iron [@aafiron] (February 10, 2019). "Scott Tolzien retired prior to training camp" (Tweet). Retrieved February 10, 2019 – via Twitter.
  47. ^ "Scott Tolzien Stats - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  48. ^ Football, Jesus (2008). Scott Tolzein. Marek. pp. 35–37.

External links

2008 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 2008 Wisconsin Badgers football team represented the University of Wisconsin–Madison during the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Badgers were coached by Bret Bielema and played their home games at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wisconsin.

2009 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 2009 Wisconsin Badgers football team competed on behalf of the University of Wisconsin–Madison during the 2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Badgers were coached by Bret Bielema and played their home games at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wisconsin. The Badgers finished the season 10–3, 5–3 in Big Ten play and beat Miami (FL) 20–14 in the Champs Sports Bowl.

2010 Big Ten Conference football season

The 2010 Big Ten Conference football season was the 115th season for the Big Ten. The conference started its season on Thursday, September 2, as conference member Minnesota traveled to Murfreesboro, Tennessee to face Middle Tennessee, and Ohio State hosted the Thundering Herd of Marshall. The conference’s other 9 teams began their respective 2010 season of NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) competition on Saturday, September 4. It was also the final season for the conference before the Nebraska Cornhuskers joined the conference from the Big 12 the following season.

2010 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 2010 Wisconsin Badgers football team represented the University of Wisconsin–Madison in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Badgers, led by fifth-year head coach Bret Bielema, were members of the Big Ten Conference and played their home games at Camp Randall Stadium. They finished the season 11–2, 7–1 in the Big Ten to be crowned Big Ten co-champions along with Michigan State. Due to being ranked the highest of the three schools in the BCS rankings at the end of the season, the Badgers earned the conference's automatic bid to the Rose Bowl, where they were defeated 21–19 by TCU.

2013 Green Bay Packers season

The 2013 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 95th season overall, the 93rd in the National Football League, and the eighth under head coach Mike McCarthy. The Packers came into the 2013 season looking to win the NFC North for the 3rd year in a row. They came off a 45-31 loss to the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Divisional Playoffs the previous season. The Packers started the 2013 season in a rematch with the 49ers, to whom they lost 34-28. After winning their home opener against the Redskins, Green Bay lost 34-30 in Cincinnati to the Bengals after holding a 30-14 lead in the 3rd quarter. Following the loss in Cincinnati, the Packers won 4 games in a row to sit at 5-2 before losing a Monday Night game at home to the Bears, 27-20. In that game, the Packers lost star quarterback Aaron Rodgers to a broken collarbone in the 1st quarter. He would be replaced by backups Scott Tolzien and Matt Flynn during recovery. In week 12, the Packers tied the Vikings 26-26; it was Green Bay's first tie since 1987.

The Packers would lose the next game 40-10 to the Lions on Thanksgiving to sit at 5-6-1, threatening to miss the postseason for the first time since 2008. The Packers then rallied to beat the Falcons 22-21 to even their record at 6-6-1. The following week, the Packers defeated the Dallas Cowboys 37-36 in Dallas after they had trailed 26-3 at halftime. The comeback was the largest in franchise history. The Packers would then lose a shootout with the Pittsburgh Steelers 38-31 at home to sit at 7-7-1, the first meeting between the teams since Super Bowl XLV. The following week, the Packers defeated the Chicago Bears 33-28 at Soldier Field to clinch the NFC North in a game in which the winner would've clinched the division. The game is well-known for a touchdown catch made by Randall Cobb from Aaron Rodgers with less than a minute remaining to seal the win. The play came on a 4th and 8 situation in which Cobb was wide open near the endzone. The Packers entered the playoffs as the 4 seed in the NFC. In the wild card game, they lost 23–20 in a rematch with the 49ers on a Phil Dawson field goal as time expired. The game was one of the coldest in NFL playoff history, with a final temperature of 5 °F (-15 °C)

The Packers would again lose Aaron Rodgers to a collarbone injury almost four years later in 2017. However, the team’s fortunes without Rodgers were much poorer the second time; the team would fail to win the division that year, finishing in third behind a more competent Detroit Lions team and surrendering the division title to arguably one of the most talented Minnesota Vikings teams in years. As a result, the Packers did not qualify for the postseason that year.

2017 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2017 Indianapolis Colts season was the franchise's 65th season in the National Football League and the 34th in Indianapolis. It was also the sixth and final season under head coach Chuck Pagano, who was fired at the end of the season. It was also the first under new general manager Chris Ballard, the former Kansas City Chiefs' Director of Football Operations, following the dismissal of Ryan Grigson. The Colts were looking to improve on their 8–8 record from last year and make the playoffs for the first time since 2014. However, star quarterback Andrew Luck suffered an injury before the regular season began and was placed on the injured reserve list, putting the season in doubt.

After an ineffective performance by backup Scott Tolzien in Week 1 against the Rams, the Colts put Jacoby Brissett as their starting quarterback for the rest of the season. However, Brissett could not save the team as they finished 4-12 for their first losing season since 2011, and missed the playoffs for the third consecutive season.

2019 AAF QB Draft

The 2019 AAF QB Draft was the inaugural draft of the Alliance of American Football (AAF) for the 2019 season. The draft was a four-round quarterback draft where clubs were allowed to "protect or pick" from the selection. It was held on November 27, 2018, at the HyperX Esports Arena at Luxor Las Vegas and broadcast on the CBS Sports Network.

Bill Troup

Paul William "Bill" Troup III (April 2, 1951 – December 14, 2013) was a professional American football player. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. An undrafted quarterback from the University of South Carolina, Troup played in seven NFL seasons from 1974 to 1980 for 2 different teams. After being released by Baltimore, Troup went north to the C.F.L.'s Winnipeg Blue Bombers, where he served as Dieter Brock's backup for the 1979 season. He saw his most extensive action for the Colts in 1978, when Bert Jones was injured and Mike Kirkland ineffective.

Blair Kiel

Blair Armstrong Kiel (November 29, 1961 – April 8, 2012) was a four-year starting quarterback and punter/holder for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team, from 1980 to 1983. He played professionally for several teams in the National Football League, the Canadian Football League, and the Arena Football League, and was inducted into the Indiana State Football Hall of Fame in 1998. Kiel worked as an advisor to corporate real estate clients in the Indianapolis area.

Brett Hundley

Brett Alan Hundley Jr. (born June 15, 1993) is an American football quarterback for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the UCLA Bruins, where he was the school's career leader in both total offense and touchdown passes. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the fifth round of the 2015 NFL Draft, and started nine games for them in 2017 following an injury to Aaron Rodgers.

Don Milan

Don Milan is a former quarterback in the National Football League. He spent two seasons in the NFL. The first with the Los Angeles Rams, though he did not see any playing time during a regular season game. His second season was with the Green Bay Packers.

Ed Mioduszewski

Edward "Ed" Thomas Mioduszewski (October 28, 1931 - September 8, 2010) was a professional American football player for the National Football League's Baltimore Colts. He played quarterback in 12 games, starting one, during the 1953 NFL season. Mioduszewski played college football at William & Mary, where as a senior in 1952 he was named a Second Team All-American by the Associated Press.Mioduszewski died on September 8, 2010, at the age of 78.

Jack Evans (American football)

John "Jack" Vinson Evans (August 5, 1905 - March 11, 1980) was a National Football League quarterback.

List of Green Bay Packers starting quarterbacks

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) and are the third-oldest franchise in the National Football League (NFL). The club was founded in 1919 by coach, player, and future Hall of Fame inductee Curly Lambeau and sports and telegraph editor George Whitney Calhoun. The Packers competed against local teams for two seasons before entering the NFL in 1921.

The Packers have had 46 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Packers' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees Curly Lambeau, Tony Canadeo, Arnie Herber, Bart Starr and Brett Favre. The team's first starting quarterback was Norm Barry, while the longest serving was Brett Favre. The Packers' starting quarterback for the 2018 season was Aaron Rodgers, who was playing in his 14th season in the NFL.

They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Packers.

List of Indianapolis Colts starting quarterbacks

The Indianapolis Colts are a professional American football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. They are currently members of the South Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL).

The club was officially founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1953, as the Baltimore Colts, replacing a previous team of that name that folded in 1950. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis.

The Colts have had 33 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Colts' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Johnny Unitas, as well as the Associated Press National Football League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) winners Earl Morrall and Bert Jones. Unitas also won the MVP award three times in his career. The franchise's first starting quarterback was Fred Enke, who started 9 games in total for the Colts. The Colts' starting quarterback from 1998 to 2011 was 5-time MVP Peyton Manning. The Colts' current starting quarterback is Andrew Luck.

Roger Grove

Roger Robert Grove (June 19, 1908 – December 19, 1986) was a professional American football running back in the National Football League. He played five seasons for the Green Bay Packers including the 1931 team that won the NFL Championship. He lettered at Michigan State in 1928, 1929 and 1930.

Roy McKay (American football)

Roy Dale McKay (February 2, 1920 – May 29, 1969) was a player in the National Football League.

Seneca Wallace

Seneca Sinclair Wallace (born August 6, 1980) is a former American football quarterback. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the fourth round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He played college football at Iowa State. He was also a member of the Cleveland Browns, New Orleans Saints, San Francisco 49ers and Green Bay Packers.

Wisconsin Badgers football statistical leaders

The Wisconsin Badgers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Wisconsin Badgers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Badgers represent the University of Wisconsin–Madison in the NCAA's Big 10 Conference.

Although Wisconsin began competing in intercollegiate football in 1889, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1946, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Badgers have reached a bowl game every year since then, giving recent players an extra game each year to accumulate statistics.

Similarly, the Badgers have played in the Big Ten Football Championship Game four times since its establishment in 2011.These lists are updated through Wisconsin's game against Miami on December 27, 2018.

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