Scantic River

The Scantic River (pronounced SKAN-tik) is a river that flows through the states of Massachusetts and Connecticut and is tributary to the Connecticut River.

The Scantic River's tributaries rise in the towns of Hampden, Wilbraham, East Longmeadow and Monson in Massachusetts, and in Stafford and Somers, Connecticut, forming the river in the town of Hampden, Massachusetts southeast of Springfield. The Scantic flows southwest for 40.6 miles (65.3 km)[1] through the towns and communities of Hampden, Massachusetts; Somers, Somersville, Scitico, Hazardville, Enfield, East Windsor, Broad Brook, Scantic, South Windsor, and East Windsor Hill, Connecticut, until joining the Connecticut River (41°52′04″N 72°36′59″W / 41.8678°N 72.6165°W) near the East Windsor Hill community, part of South Windsor.

There are two areas named after the river. One is a small community, part of East Windsor. The other is in the southeast section of Hampden, near the corner of Scantic Road and Rock-A-Dundee Road.

The state of Connecticut is working to form a state park surrounding the Scantic River in the towns of Somers, Enfield, East Windsor, and South Windsor. Two areas that are proposed for public park areas are the Scantic River State Park at Powder Hollow in Enfield and the Scantic River State Park at Trolley Crossing just south of Broad Brook where the planned route of the Connecticut Trolley Museum's main line crosses the river.

Among things named after the river are several roads, the Scantic River Valley YMCA, the Scantic River Artists, the Scantic River Watershed Assn., and many others.

Scantic River (Connecticut) map
The lower Scantic River and environs, depicted on an 1892 topographic map.

See also

References

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline data. The National Map, accessed April 1, 2011

External links

Augustus George Hazard

Augustus George Hazard (April 28, 1802 – May 7, 1868), known as Colonel Augustus Hazard, was an American manufacturer of gunpowder and the namesake of Hazardville, Connecticut.

Hazard was born in Kingston, Rhode Island, on April 28, 1802, a son of Thomas and Silence Knowles Hazard. His family moved to Connecticut when he was six years old. As a young man, he worked as a merchant in Savannah, Georgia. In 1827 he relocated to New York City, where he was a commission agent engaged in the sale of gunpowder and other products. In 1837 he bought into a gunpowder production company that had been established two years earlier on the Scantic River in the town of Enfield, Connecticut. He assumed sole ownership of the company in 1843. The business was known thereafter as the Hazard Powder Company, and the village that supported it became known as Hazardville.During the early years of the Civil War, Colonel Hazard was under suspicion by the federal government as being sympathetic to the Southern cause. It was well known that he was a good friend of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, and that he lived in the South and had developed many business relationships. Shortly before South Carolina seceded from the Union, it bought 80,000 lbs. of powder that was used to propel the first shots fired on Fort Sumter. In fact, much of the powder in the Southern arsenals at the outset of the war was manufactured by the Connecticut company.

The rapidly increasing demand for powder products compelled Hazard to hurry to expand his facilities to meet war time production needs. Soon Hazard Powder was supplying the Union Forces with 12,500 lbs of powder a day. The mill at Hazardville was in operation 24 hours a day and produced 40% of all the gunpowder used during the Civil War by the Union.

Hazard lived on Enfield Street in Enfield, several miles from the powder mill, and ran the business until his death on May 7, 1868, at Ascot House in New York City.

East Windsor Hill Historic District

East Windsor Hill Historic District is a historic district located in the northwestern corner of the town of South Windsor, Connecticut. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. The district runs along both sides of Main Street from the Scantic River south to the Edwards Cemetery. The district also includes areas west of Main Street to the Connecticut River, including properties along Ferry Lane. The district is located directly north of another historic district, Windsor Farms Historic District. The district encompasses a neighborhood of well-preserved largely folk vernacular buildings erected between about 1700 and 1860.

George Waldo State Park

George Waldo State Park is an undeveloped public recreation area on the eastern shore of Lake Lillinonah in the town of Southbury, Connecticut. Park activities include hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, fishing, and hunting. The state park is managed by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

Hazard Powder Company

The Hazard Powder Company is a former American manufacturer of gunpowder and explosives.

Hazardville, Connecticut

Hazardville is a section of the town of Enfield, Connecticut, in Hartford County. It is a census-designated place (CDP) that had a total population of 4,599 as of the 2010 census.

Hazardville Historic District

The Hazardville Historic District is a historic district in the Hazardville section of Enfield, Connecticut, United States, that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

John A. Minetto State Park

John A. Minetto State Park is a public recreation area encompassing 715 acres (289 ha) in the towns of Goshen and Torrington, Connecticut. Facilities are available for picnicking, fishing, and cross-country skiing. The state park is managed by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

List of Connecticut state parks

This is a list of state parks and reserves in the Connecticut state park system, shown in four tables. The first table lists state parks and reserves, the second lists state park trails, the third list state forests, and the fourth lists other state-owned, recreation-related areas.

Macedonia Brook State Park

Macedonia Brook State Park is a public recreation area covering 2,302 acres (932 ha) in the town of Kent, Connecticut, United States. Visitors can camp in a 51-site campground, picnic, fish, and hike the blue-blazed Macedonia Ridge Trail, which crosses Cobble Mountain and other peaks. The park's first 1,552 acres (628 ha) were a gift made in 1918 by the White Memorial Foundation.

Melrose Road Bridge

The Melrose Road Bridge is a historic bridge at the western end of Melrose Road in East Windsor, Connecticut. Built in 1888, it is one of a small number of surviving 19th-century lenticular pony truss bridge in the state. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. It has been closed for many years, and lacks stringers and decking.

Mooween State Park

Mooween State Park is a public recreation area covering 577 acres (234 ha) in the town of Lebanon, Connecticut. The state park offers hiking and mountain biking plus fishing and boating on 127-acre (51 ha) Red Cedar Lake.

Platt Hill State Park

Platt Hill State Park is an undeveloped public recreation area occupying 159 acres (64 ha) in the town of Winchester, Connecticut. The state park has hiking trails, picnicking sites, and views of the surrounding area.

Ross Pond State Park

Ross Pond State Park is a public recreation area covering 314 acres (127 ha) in the town of Killingly, Connecticut. The state park offers hiking, hunting, fishing, and a boat launch. It sits adjacent to Old Furnace State Park and a blue-blazed trail connects the two. Ross Pond State Park entered the Connecticut Register and Manual in 1964 as a state park of 181 acres (73 ha).

Scantic

Scantic may refer to

Scantic River State Park

Scantic River State Park is a public recreation area consisting of several separated parcels totaling 784 acres (317 ha) along the Scantic River in the towns of Enfield, East Windsor, and Somers, Connecticut. The state park is suitable for hiking, fishing, and hunting and is managed by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

Somersville Historic District

The Somersville Historic District encompasses the historic components of the mill village of Somersville in western Somers, Connecticut, United States. The district is centered on a mill complex on the Scantic River, which divides the district. The most significant years of development were between about 1835 and 1935, although the area has a history (and surviving structures) dating to the 1760s. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. The Mill itself has since burned down and as of October 2018 is currently open field, although the canal structure remains in place.

Tunxis State Forest

Tunxis State Forest is a Connecticut state forest located in the towns of Hartland, Barkhamsted, and Granby. The forest surrounds Barkhamsted Reservoir and borders the Granville State Forest in Massachusetts. The forest is used for hiking, mountain biking, cross-country skiing, fishing, hunting, and letterboxing. Several trails cross the forest, including the northern end of the blue-blazed Tunxis Trail.

Whittemore Glen State Park

Whittemore Glen State Park is an undeveloped public recreation and wilderness area for hiking and horseback riding covering 242 acres (98 ha) mostly within the town of Naugatuck, Connecticut. Sitting outside the southwestern edge of the city of Waterbury, the state park is the eastern terminus of the Larkin State Park Trail. It entered the roles as Connecticut's forty-eighth state park in the 1945–46 edition of the Connecticut Register and Manual. The park is managed by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

Windsor Locks Canal State Park Trail

Windsor Locks Canal State Park Trail is a public recreation area that parallels the Connecticut River for 4.5 miles (7.2 km) between Suffield and Windsor Locks, Connecticut. The modern paved surface covers the original dirt towpath of the historic Enfield Falls Canal. The park is used for fishing, hiking, and biking.

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