Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film

The Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film is one of the Saturn Awards that has been presented annually since 1972 by Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to the best film in the science fiction genre of the previous year.

Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film
Awarded forBest motion picture of the year in the science fiction genre
CountryUnited States
Presented byAcademy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films
First awarded1972
Currently held byBlade Runner 2049 (2018)
Websitewww.saturnawards.org

Winners and nominees

In the list below, winners are listed first in bold, followed by the other nominees. The number of the ceremony (1st, 2nd, etc.) appears in parentheses after the awards year, linked to the article (if any) on that ceremony.

1970s

Year Film
1972
(1st)
Slaughterhouse-Five
1973
(2nd)
Soylent Green
Battle for the Planet of the Apes
The Day of the Dolphin
The Neptune Factor
Sleeper
Beware! The Blob
Sssssss
Westworld
1974/75
(3rd)
Rollerball
A Boy and His Dog
The Stepford Wives
1976
(4th)
Logan's Run
Embryo
Futureworld
God Told Me To
The Man Who Fell to Earth
Network
Solaris (Солярис)
1977
(5th)
Star Wars
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Demon Seed
The Island of Dr. Moreau
Twilight's Last Gleaming
1978
(6th)
Superman
The Boys from Brazil
Capricorn One
The Cat from Outer Space
Invasion of the Body Snatchers
1979
(7th)
Alien
The Black Hole
Moonraker
Star Trek: The Motion Picture
Time After Time

1980s

Year Film
1980
(8th)
The Empire Strikes Back
Altered States
Battle Beyond the Stars
The Final Countdown
Flash Gordon
1981
(9th)
Superman II
Escape from New York
Heartbeeps
Heavy Metal
Outland
1982
(10th)
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
Blade Runner
Endangered Species
Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Tron
1983
(11th)
Return of the Jedi
Blue Thunder
Brainstorm
Strange Invaders
WarGames
1984
(12th)
The Terminator
Dune
Starman
2010: The Year We Make Contact
Star Trek III: The Search for Spock
1985
(13th)
Back to the Future
Cocoon
Enemy Mine
Mad Max 3: Beyond Thunderdome
A View to a Kill
1986
(14th)
Aliens
Flight of the Navigator
Peggy Sue Got Married
Short Circuit
Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
1987
(15th)
RoboCop
The Hidden
Innerspace
Masters of the Universe
Predator
The Running Man
1988
(16th)
Alien Nation
The Blob
Cocoon: The Return
My Stepmother Is an Alien
Short Circuit 2
They Live
1989/90
(17th)
Total Recall
The Abyss
Back to the Future Part II
Back to the Future Part III
Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure
Flatliners
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids
RoboCop 2
Tremors

1990s

Year Film
1991
(18th)
Terminator 2: Judgment Day
Frankenstein Unbound
Timescape
Prayer of the Rollerboys
Predator 2
The Rocketeer
1992
(19th)
Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country
Alien 3
Freejack
Honey, I Blew Up the Kid
The Lawnmower Man
Memoirs of an Invisible Man
1993
(20th)
Jurassic Park
Demolition Man
Fire in the Sky
Fortress
Man's Best Friend
The Meteor Man
RoboCop 3
1994
(21st)
Stargate
Body Snatchers
No Escape
The Puppet Masters
Star Trek Generations
Street Fighter
Timecop
1995
(22nd)
12 Monkeys
Congo
Judge Dredd
Outbreak
Species
Strange Days
Waterworld
1996
(23rd)
Independence Day
Escape from L.A.
The Island of Dr. Moreau
Mars Attacks!
Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie
Star Trek: First Contact
1997
(24th)
Men in Black
Alien: Resurrection
Contact
The Fifth Element (Le Cinquième Élément)
The Postman
Starship Troopers
1998
(25th)
Armageddon
Dark City
Deep Impact
Lost in Space
Star Trek: Insurrection
The X Files: Fight the Future
1999
(26th)
The Matrix
Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace
The Thirteenth Floor
eXistenZ
Galaxy Quest
Pitch Black

2000s

Year Film
2000
(27th)
X-Men
The 6th Day
The Cell
Hollow Man
Space Cowboys
Titan A.E.
2001
(28th)
A.I. Artificial Intelligence
Jurassic Park III
Lara Croft: Tomb Raider
The One
Planet of the Apes
Vanilla Sky
2002
(29th)
Minority Report
Men in Black II
Signs
Solaris
Star Trek: Nemesis
Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones
2003
(30th)
X2
Hulk
Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life
The Matrix Revolutions
Paycheck
Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines
2004
(31st)
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
The Butterfly Effect
The Day After Tomorrow
The Forgotten
I, Robot
Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow
2005
(32nd)
Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith
Fantastic Four
The Island
The Jacket
Serenity
War of the Worlds
2006
(33rd)
Children of Men
Déjà Vu
The Fountain
The Prestige
V for Vendetta
X-Men: The Last Stand
2007
(34th)
Cloverfield
Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer
I Am Legend
The Last Mimzy
Sunshine
Transformers
2008
(35th)
Iron Man
Eagle Eye
Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
Jumper
The Day the Earth Stood Still
The Incredible Hulk
2009
(36th)
Avatar
Knowing
Moon
Star Trek
The Book of Eli
Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen
X-Men Origins: Wolverine

2010s

Year Film
2010
(37th)
Inception
Hereafter
Iron Man 2
Never Let Me Go
Splice
Tron: Legacy
2011
(38th)
Rise of the Planet of the Apes
The Adjustment Bureau
Captain America: The First Avenger
Limitless
Super 8
X-Men: First Class
2012
(39th)
The Avengers
Chronicle
Cloud Atlas
The Hunger Games
Looper
Prometheus
2013
(40th)
Gravity
Ender's Game
The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
Pacific Rim
Riddick
Star Trek Into Darkness
2014
(41st)
Interstellar
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
Edge of Tomorrow
Godzilla
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1
The Zero Theorem
2015
(42nd)
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Ex Machina
Jurassic World
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
Terminator Genisys
2016
(43rd)
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Arrival
Independence Day: Resurgence
Midnight Special
Passengers
Star Trek Beyond
2017
(44th)
Blade Runner 2049
Alien: Covenant
Life
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets
War for the Planet of the Apes

See also

External links

Alex Proyas

Alexander Proyas (; born 23 September 1963) is an Australian film director, screenwriter, and producer. Proyas is best known for directing the films The Crow (1994), Dark City (1998), I, Robot (2004), Knowing (2009), and Gods of Egypt (2016).

Back to the Future

Back to the Future is a 1985 American science fiction film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Zemeckis and Bob Gale. It stars Michael J. Fox as teenager Marty McFly, who accidentally travels back in time to 1955, where he meets his future parents and becomes his mother's romantic interest. Christopher Lloyd portrays the eccentric scientist Dr. Emmett "Doc" Brown, inventor of the time-traveling DeLorean, who helps Marty repair history and return to 1985.

Zemeckis and Gale wrote the script after Gale wondered whether he would have befriended his father if they had attended school together. Film studios rejected it until the financial success of Zemeckis' Romancing the Stone. Zemeckis approached Steven Spielberg, who agreed to produce the project at Amblin Entertainment, with Universal Pictures as distributor. Fox was the first choice to play Marty, but he was busy filming his television series Family Ties, and Eric Stoltz was cast; after the filmmakers decided he was wrong for the role, a deal was struck to allow Fox to film Back to the Future without interrupting his television schedule.

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 and it grossed over $381 million worldwide, becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. It won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film, and the Academy Award for Best Sound Effects Editing. It received three Academy Award nominations, five BAFTA nominations, and four Golden Globe nominations, including Best Motion Picture (Musical or Comedy). In 2007, the Library of Congress selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry, and in June 2008 the American Film Institute's special AFI's 10 Top 10 designated it the 10th-best science fiction film. The film began a franchise including two sequels, Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Back to the Future Part III (1990), an animated series, theme park ride, and several video games.

Chronicle (film)

Chronicle is a 2012 American found footage superhero science-fiction thriller film directed by Josh Trank and written by Max Landis based on a story by both. It follows three Seattle high school seniors, bullied Andrew (Dane DeHaan); his cousin Matt (Alex Russell); and more popular Steve (Michael B. Jordan) — who form a bond after gaining telekinetic powers from an unknown crystalline object found underground.

Chronicle premiered at the Gérardmer Film Festival on January 28, 2012. It was released in the United Kingdom and Ireland on February 1, 2012, and in the United States on February 3, 2012.

Drew Goddard

Andrew Brion Hogan Goddard (born February 26, 1975) is an American film and television screenwriter, director, and producer. He began his career as a writer on acclaimed television series, such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Alias, and Lost. He also created the Netflix superhero series Daredevil.

Goddard received further recognition for writing the successful monster horror film Cloverfield (2008) and the action horror film World War Z (2013). Goddard then wrote the screenplay for the acclaimed science fiction film The Martian (2015), for which he won the National Board of Review Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Goddard co-wrote and made his directorial feature film debut with the horror-comedy film The Cabin in the Woods (2012). He also directed, wrote and produced the mystery thriller film Bad Times at the El Royale (2018).

Eagle Eye

Eagle Eye is a 2008 American action thriller film directed by D. J. Caruso, written by John Glenn, Travis Adam Wright, Hillary Seitz and Dan McDermott and stars Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan and Billy Bob Thornton. The plot follows two strangers who must go on the run together after receiving a mysterious phone call from an unknown woman who is using information and communications technology to track them.

The film was released in traditional theaters and IMAX theaters on September 26, 2008 and grossed $178 million worldwide.

Francis Ford Coppola filmography

Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) has worked in a number of prominent films as director, writer and producer.

James Cameron

James Francis Cameron (born August 16, 1954) is a Canadian filmmaker, environmentalist, explorer, and philanthropist who lives in the United States. After working in special effects, he found major success after directing and writing the science fiction action film The Terminator (1984). He then became a popular Hollywood director and was hired to write and direct Aliens (1986); three years later he followed up with The Abyss (1989). He found further critical acclaim for his use of special effects in Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991). After his film True Lies (1994), Cameron took on his biggest film at the time, Titanic (1997), which earned him Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Film Editing.

After Titanic, Cameron began a project that took almost 10 years to make: his science-fiction epic Avatar (2009), which was in particular a landmark for 3D technology, and for which he received nominations for the same three Academy Awards. Despite Avatar being his only movie made to date in 3D, Cameron is the most successful 3D film-maker in terms of box-office revenue. In the time between making Titanic and Avatar, Cameron spent several years creating many documentary films (specifically underwater documentaries) and co-developed the digital 3D Fusion Camera System. Described by a biographer as part scientist and part artist, Cameron has also contributed to underwater filming and remote vehicle technologies. On March 26, 2012, Cameron reached the bottom of the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean, in the Deepsea Challenger submersible. He is the first person to do this in a solo descent, and is only the third person to do so ever. In 2010, Time magazine listed Cameron among the 100 most influential people in the world.In total, Cameron's directorial efforts have grossed approximately US$2 billion in North America and US$6 billion worldwide. Not adjusted for inflation, Cameron's Titanic and Avatar are the two highest-grossing films of all time at $2.19 billion and $2.78 billion respectively. Cameron also holds the distinction of having directed the first two of the four films in history to gross over $2 billion worldwide (the later two being Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Avengers: Infinity War). In March 2011, he was named Hollywood's top earner by Vanity Fair, with estimated 2010 earnings of $257 million. In October 2013, a new species of frog Pristimantis jamescameroni from Venezuela was named after him in recognition of his efforts in environmental awareness, in addition to his public promotion of veganism.

List of science fiction films of the 1970s

A list of science fiction films released in the 1970s. These films include core elements of science fiction, but can cross into other genres. They have been released to a cinema audience by the commercial film industry and are widely distributed with reviews by reputable critics.

During the 1970s, blockbuster science fiction films, which reached a much larger audience than previously, began to make their appearance. The financial success of these films resulted in heavy investment in special effects by the American film industry, leading to big-budget, heavily marketed science fiction film releases during the 1990s. Collectively, the science fiction films from the 1970s received 11 Academy Awards, 10 Saturn Awards, six Hugo Awards, three Nebula Awards and two Grammy Awards. Two of these films, Star Wars (1977, currently known as Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope) and Superman (1978), were the highest grossing films of their respective years of release.

List of science fiction films of the 1980s

A list of science fiction films released in the 1980s. These films include core elements of science fiction, but can cross into other genres. They have been released to a cinema audience by the commercial film industry and are widely distributed with reviews by reputable critics.

Collectively, the science fiction films from the 1980s have received 14 Academy Awards, 11 Saturn Awards, six Hugo Awards, five BAFTA awards, four BSFA Awards, and one Golden Globe Award. Four of these movies were the highest grossing films of their respective years of release. However, these films also received nine Golden Raspberry Awards.

List of science fiction films of the 1990s

A list of science fiction films released in the 1990s. These films include core elements of science fiction, but can cross into other genres. They have been released to a cinema audience by the commercial film industry and are widely distributed with reviews by reputable critics.

Collectively, the science fiction films from the 1990s have received 13 Academy Awards, 15 Saturn Awards, five Hugo Awards, one Nebula Award and one Golden Globe Award. Four of these movies were the highest-grossing films of their respective years of release. However, these films also received 10 Golden Raspberry Awards.

List of science fiction films of the 2000s

This is a list of science fiction films released in the 2000s. These films include core elements of science fiction, but can cross into other genres. They have been released to a cinema audience by the commercial film industry and are widely distributed with reviews by reputable critics. Collectively, the science fiction films from the 2000s have received six Academy Awards, twenty Saturn Awards, two Hugo Awards, one Nebula Award, five BAFTA awards, and six Magritte Awards. However, these films also received 17 Golden Raspberry Awards.

Lists of science fiction films

This is a list of science fiction films organized chronologically. These films have been released to a cinema audience by the commercial film industry and are widely distributed with reviews by reputable

critics. (The exception are the films on the made-for-TV list, which are normally not released to a cinema audience.) This includes silent film–era releases, serial films, and feature-length films. All of the films include core elements of science fiction, but can cross into other genres such as drama, mystery, action, horror, fantasy, and comedy.

Among the listed movies are films that have won motion-picture and science fiction awards as well as films that have been listed among the worst movies ever made, or have won one or more Golden Raspberry Awards. Critically distinguished films are indicated by footnotes in the listings.

Nicholas Meyer

Nicholas Meyer (born December 24, 1945) is an American writer and director, known for his best-selling novel The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, and for directing the films Time After Time, two of the Star Trek feature film series, the 1983 television movie The Day After, and the 1999 HBO original movie Vendetta.

Meyer was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for the film The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976), where he adapted his own novel into a screenplay. He has also been nominated for a Satellite Award, three Emmy Awards, and has won four Saturn Awards. He appeared as himself during the 2017 On Cinema spinoff series The Trial, during which he testified about Star Trek and San Francisco.

Saturn Award for Best Film

The Saturn Awards have various Best Film categories. Saturn Award for Best Film may refer to:

Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film (since 1972)

Saturn Award for Best Horror Film (since 1972), known as Best Horror or Thriller Film from 2010 to 2012

Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film (since 1973)

Saturn Award for Best Animated Film (1978, 1982, 2002–present)

Saturn Award for Best Foreign Film (1979 only)

Saturn Award for Best Low-Budget Film (1980–1982)

Saturn Award for Best International Film (1980, 2006–present)

Saturn Award for Best Action or Adventure Film (since 1994), originally Best Action/Adventure/Thriller Film from 1994 to 2010)

Best Thriller Film (since 2010), originally Best Horror or Thriller Film from 2010 to 2012

Best Independent Film (since 2012)

Best Comic-to-Film Motion Picture (since 2013)

Soylent Green

Soylent Green is a 1973 American dystopian thriller film directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Charlton Heston and Leigh Taylor-Young. Edward G. Robinson appears in his final film. Loosely based on the 1966 science fiction novel Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison, it combines both police procedural and science fiction genres; the investigation into the murder of a wealthy businessman and a dystopian future of dying oceans and year-round humidity due to the greenhouse effect, resulting in suffering from pollution, poverty, overpopulation, euthanasia and depleted resources.In 1973 it won the Nebula Award for Best Dramatic Presentation and the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film.

Street Fighter (1994 film)

Street Fighter is a 1994 Japanese-American action film written and directed by Steven E. de Souza, based on the Street Fighter video game series, produced by Capcom. It stars Jean-Claude Van Damme, and Raúl Juliá, along with supporting performances by Byron Mann, Damian Chapa, Kylie Minogue, Ming-Na Wen and Wes Studi.

Loosely following the plot of Street Fighter II: The World Warrior, the film focuses on the efforts of Colonel Guile (Van Damme) to bring down General M. Bison (Juliá), the military dictator and drug kingpin of Shadaloo City who aspires to conquer the world with an army of genetic supersoldiers, while enlisting the aid of street fighters Ryu (Mann) and Ken (Chapa) to infiltrate Bison's empire and help destroy it from within.

The film was a commercial success, with a worldwide box office gross approximately three times its production costs, and its home video releases and television broadcasts were also profitable, with the film earning Capcom a return of ¥15.5 billion ($165 million) from the box office and home media, but the film itself was not well-received by critics or fans of the games for its campy tones and use of characters. Raúl Juliá's performance as M. Bison, however, was widely praised and garnered him a posthumous nomination for Best Supporting Actor at the Saturn Awards, while the film was nominated for the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film. The film was also Julia's final theatrical performance, as he died of a stroke two months before the film's release; the film is dedicated to his memory.

An intended reboot, Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li, was released in 2009 to critical and commercial failure, while a much more positively-received British television series focusing on Ryu and Ken, Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist, was released in 2014.

The Thirteenth Floor

The Thirteenth Floor is a 1999 neo-noir science fiction crime thriller film written and directed by Josef Rusnak, and produced by Roland Emmerich. It is loosely based upon Simulacron-3 (1964), a novel by Daniel F. Galouye, and a remake of the German film World on a Wire (1973). The film stars Craig Bierko, Gretchen Mol, Armin Mueller-Stahl, Vincent D'Onofrio, and Dennis Haysbert. In 2000, The Thirteenth Floor was nominated for the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film, but lost to The Matrix.

Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film
Film
Television
Home Video
Special Awards
Retired Awards
Ceremonies

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.