Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film

The Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film is an award presented to the best film in the fantasy genre by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films.

Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film
Awarded forBest motion picture of the year in the fantasy genre
CountryUnited States
Presented byAcademy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films
First awarded1973
Currently held byThe Shape of Water (2018)
Websitewww.saturnawards.org

Winners and nominees

"†" means that the film won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

"‡" means that the film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture.

1970s

Year Motion Picture
1973
(2nd)
The Golden Voyage of Sinbad
1974/75
(3rd)
Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze
1976
(4th)
The Holes (Les gaspards)
At the Earth's Core
The Blue Bird
Bugsy Malone
The Seven-Per-Cent Solution
1977
(5th)
Oh, God!
Pete's Dragon
Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger
The Slipper and the Rose: The Story of Cinderella
Wizards
1978
(6th)
Heaven Can Wait
The Lord of the Rings
La Merveilleuse Visite
Watership Down
The Wiz
1979
(7th)
The Muppet Movie
Dinner for Adele
Arabian Adventure
The Last Wave
Nutcracker Fantasy

1980s

Year Motion Picture
1980
(8th)
Somewhere in Time
The Blue Lagoon
The Ninth Configuration
Oh, God! Book II
Popeye
1981
(9th)
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Clash of the Titans
Dragonslayer
Excalibur
The Fox and the Hound
1982
(10th)
The Dark Crystal
Conan the Barbarian
The Secret of NIMH
The Sword and the Sorcerer
Zapped!
1983
(11th)
Something Wicked This Way Comes
High Road to China
Krull
Never Say Never Again
Octopussy
1984
(12th)
Ghostbusters
Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
The NeverEnding Story
Splash
1985
(13th)
Ladyhawke
Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins
Return to Oz
The Purple Rose of Cairo
Young Sherlock Holmes
1986
(14th)
The Boy Who Could Fly
An American Tail
"Crocodile" Dundee
The Golden Child
Labyrinth
1987
(15th)
The Princess Bride
Batteries Not Included
Date with an Angel
Harry and the Hendersons
The Living Daylights
The Witches of Eastwick
1988
(16th)
Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Big
The Land Before Time
Scrooged
Willow
Without a Clue
1989/90
(17th)
Ghost
The Adventures of Baron Munchausen
Always
Batman
Dick Tracy
Field of Dreams
Gremlins 2: The New Batch
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

1990s

Year Motion Picture
1991
(18th)
Edward Scissorhands
Defending Your Life
The Fisher King
If Looks Could Kill
Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves
Warlock
1992
(19th)
Aladdin
The Addams Family
Batman Returns
Beauty and the Beast
Death Becomes Her
Hook
Toys
1993
(20th)
The Nightmare Before Christmas
Addams Family Values
Groundhog Day
Heart and Souls
Hocus Pocus
Last Action Hero
Rookie of the Year
1994
(21st)
Forrest Gump
Angels in the Outfield
Ed Wood
The Flintstones
The Lion King
The Mask
The Santa Clause
1995
(22nd)
Babe
Batman Forever
Casper
Fluke
The Indian in the Cupboard
Jumanji
Toy Story
1996
(23rd)
Dragonheart
Matilda
The Adventures of Pinocchio
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
James and the Giant Peach
The Nutty Professor
Phenomenon
1997
(24th)
Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery
Batman & Robin
George of the Jungle
Hercules
The Lost World: Jurassic Park
MouseHunt
1998
(25th)
The Truman Show
Babe: Pig in the City
A Bug's Life
City of Angels
Godzilla
Pleasantville
1999
(26th)
Being John Malkovich
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me
The Mummy
Stuart Little
Tarzan
Toy Story 2

2000s

Year Motion Picture
2000
(27th)
Frequency
Chicken Run
Dinosaur
The Family Man
How the Grinch Stole Christmas
What Women Want
2001
(28th)
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Monsters, Inc.
The Mummy Returns
Shrek
Spy Kids
2002
(29th)
The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Reign of Fire
The Santa Clause 2
The Scorpion King
Spider-Man
2003
(30th)
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
Big Fish
Freaky Friday
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen
Peter Pan
Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl
2004
(31st)
Spider-Man 2
Birth
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Hellboy
Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events
House of Flying Daggers
2005
(32nd)
Batman Begins
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
King Kong
Zathura: A Space Adventure
2006
(33rd)
Superman Returns
Charlotte's Web
Eragon
Night at the Museum
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest
Stranger than Fiction
2007
(34th)
Enchanted
The Golden Compass
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End
Spider-Man 3
Stardust
2008
(35th)
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
Hancock
The Spiderwick Chronicles
Twilight
Wanted
2009
(36th)
Watchmen
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
The Lovely Bones
The Time Traveler's Wife
Where the Wild Things Are

2010s

Year Motion Picture
2010
(37th)
Alice in Wonderland
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
Clash of the Titans
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1
Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
The Twilight Saga: Eclipse
2011
(38th)
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2
Hugo
Immortals
Midnight in Paris
The Muppets
Thor
2012
(39th)
Life of Pi
The Amazing Spider-Man
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
Ruby Sparks
Snow White and the Huntsman
Ted
2013
(40th)
Her
About Time
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Jack the Giant Slayer
Oz the Great and Powerful
The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
2014
(41st)
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Birdman
The Grand Budapest Hotel
Into the Woods
Maleficent
Paddington
2015
(42nd)
Cinderella
The Age of Adaline
Baahubali: The Beginning
Goosebumps
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2
Ted 2
2016
(43rd)
The Jungle Book
A Monster Calls
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Ghostbusters
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children
Pete's Dragon
The BFG
2017
(44th)
The Shape of Water
Beauty and the Beast
Downsizing
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Kong: Skull Island
Paddington 2

External links

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Freaky Friday (2003 film)

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The film was released in theaters on August 6, 2003, by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Pictures. It received positive reviews from film critics and it earned over $160 million worldwide on a $20 million budget. It was Disney's third film adaptation of the novel, after the film Freaky Friday (1976), starring Barbara Harris and Jodie Foster, and the television film Freaky Friday (1995), starring Shelley Long and Gaby Hoffmann.

It was released on VHS and DVD on December 16, 2003, by Walt Disney Home Entertainment.

Ivan Reitman

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Ladyhawke (film)

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Nutcracker Fantasy

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Nutcracker Fantasy marks as the first stop-motion project by Sanrio, followed by Hello Kitty's Stump Village 37 years later. The film's overall animation style is reminiscent of all the original Rankin/Bass "Animagic" productions, shot at Tadahito Mochinaga's MOM Production (later renamed Video Tokyo Production) in which Nakamura work for. A remastered version of the film was announced by Sanrio, with an advanced screening at the 27th Tokyo International Film Festival in October 29, 2014 and released formally in theaters in November 29, 2014 as part of Hello Kitty's 40th anniversary.

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S. S. Rajamouli

Koduri Srisaila Sri Rajamouli (born 1973), known professionally as S. S. Rajamouli is an Indian film director and screenwriter, known for his works primarily in Telugu cinema. He is known for directing high fantasy works such as Magadheera (2009), Eega (2012), the two part Baahubali: The Beginning (2015) and Baahubali 2: The Conclusion (2017). The Baahubali franchise has achieved the highest grossing Indian multilingual film franchise of all time globally, with a box office of approximately ₹1,900 crore (US$260 million). The first edition, Baahubali: The Beginning was nominated for Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film, while the second edition, Baahubali 2: The Conclusion received the Saturn Award for Best International Film by the American Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. The second edition, garnered the Australian Telstra People's Choice Award at the 2017 Indian Film Festival of Melbourne.His other works include the sports drama film Sye and the social problem film Vikramarkudu, which was screened at the 37th International Film Festival of India in the mainstream section. The melodrama films Maryada Ramanna, Vikramarkudu and Chhatrapati were remade in various Indian languages, with successful reviews. Rajamouli has garnered several awards including three National Film Awards, four Filmfare Awards South, five state Nandi Awards, the IIFA Award, two SIIMA Awards, the Star World India, "Entertainer of The Year" in 2012, and the "CNN-News18 Indian of the Year in Entertainment" for 2015. In 2016, he was honoured with the Padma Shri, India's fourth highest civilian honour for his contributions towards the field of Art.

Saturn Award for Best Film

The Saturn Awards have various Best Film categories. Saturn Award for Best Film may refer to:

Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film (since 1972)

Saturn Award for Best Horror Film (since 1972), known as Best Horror or Thriller Film from 2010 to 2012

Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film (since 1973)

Saturn Award for Best Animated Film (1978, 1982, 2002–present)

Saturn Award for Best Foreign Film (1979 only)

Saturn Award for Best Low-Budget Film (1980–1982)

Saturn Award for Best International Film (1980, 2006–present)

Saturn Award for Best Action or Adventure Film (since 1994), originally Best Action/Adventure/Thriller Film from 1994 to 2010)

Best Thriller Film (since 2010), originally Best Horror or Thriller Film from 2010 to 2012

Best Independent Film (since 2012)

Best Comic-to-Film Motion Picture (since 2013)

Shobu Yarlagadda

Shobu Yarlagadda is an Indian American environmental engineer – turned film producer, and the son-in-law of veteran film maker K. Raghavendra Rao. He is the co-founder and CEO of Arka Media Works, a film production company known for its works exclusively in Telugu cinema. Shobu has garnered the National Film Award, two state Nandi Awards, three Filmfare South Awards, and the Telstra People's Choice Award.

In 2015, Shobhu produced Baahubali: The Beginning, which recorded the highest grossing Indian film within India. Touted to be the most expensive Indian film, the film was featured in the BBC's documentary on 100 Years of Indian cinema.He produced the two part Baahubali: The Beginning (2015) premiered at the Brussels International Fantastic Film Festival, and Baahubali 2: The Conclusion (2017) premiered at the British Film Institute, while becoming the highest grossing Indian multilingual film franchise of all time globally with a cumulative box office earnings of approximately ₹1,900 crore (US$260 million). The first part of the Telugu film has received the National Film Award for Best Feature Film, and got nominated for Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film by the American Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. The second part has garnered the Telstra People's Choice Award at the 2017 Indian Film Festival of Melbourne.

Something Wicked This Way Comes (film)

Something Wicked This Way Comes is a 1983 American dark fantasy film directed by Jack Clayton and produced by Walt Disney Productions, from a screenplay written by Ray Bradbury, based on his novel of the same name. The title was taken from a line in Act IV of William Shakespeare's Macbeth: "By the pricking of my thumbs / Something wicked this way comes." It stars Jason Robards, Jonathan Pryce, Diane Ladd, and Pam Grier.

The film was shot in Vermont and at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California. It had a troubled production – Clayton fell out with Bradbury over an uncredited script rewrite, and after test screenings of the director's cut failed to meet the studio's expectations, Disney sidelined Clayton, fired the original editor, and scrapped the original score, spending some $5 million and many months re-shooting, re-editing and re-scoring the film before its eventual release.

Suzanne Todd

Suzanne Todd (born June 1, 1965) is an American film and television producer whose movies have grossed over two billion dollars worldwide. She is the owner of the film production company Team Todd and has produced hits for nearly every major studio. Todd's films have been honored by the Academy Awards, Golden Globes and Emmys, and she has been presented with many awards including Women in Film's celebrated Lucy Award, the Independent Spirit Award for Best Picture, Cosmo's Fun Fearless Female Award, the GLAAD media award, four Saturn Awards, several MTV Movie Awards, a People's Choice Award and many others.

The Blue Bird (1976 film)

The Blue Bird is a 1976 American-Soviet children's fantasy film directed by George Cukor. The screenplay by Hugh Whitemore, Alfred Hayes, and Aleksei Kapler is based on L'Oiseau bleu by Maurice Maeterlinck. It was the fifth screen adaptation of the play, following two silent films, the studio's 1940 version starring Shirley Temple, and a 1970 animated feature. Unlike prior adaptations, the film received little-to-no critical praise and was a flop at the box office.

The Blue Lagoon (1980 film)

The Blue Lagoon is a 1980 American romantic survival drama film directed by Randal Kleiser from a screenplay written by Douglas Day Stewart based on the 1908 novel of the same name by Henry De Vere Stacpoole. The film stars Brooke Shields and Christopher Atkins. The music score was composed by Basil Poledouris and the cinematography was by Néstor Almendros.

It tells the story of two young children marooned on a tropical island paradise in the South Pacific. With neither the guidance nor the restrictions of society, emotional feelings and physical changes arise as they reach puberty and fall in love. The film contained a substantial amount of sexual content, and both main characters were depicted in the nude. This was controversial, as Shields was 14 years old at the time of the filming. A body double was used for all of her nude scenes and her breasts remained covered in frontal shots.

The Blue Lagoon was theatrically released on June 20, 1980 by Columbia Pictures. The film was panned by the critics, who disparaged its screenplay and execution and Shields's performance, although Almendros's cinematography received praise. In spite of criticism, the film was a commercial success, grossing over $58 million on a $4.5 million budget, becoming the ninth highest grossing film of 1980 in North America. The film received a significant amount of awards attention. It was nominated for the Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film, Almendros received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Atkins was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actor, and Shields won the inaugural Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress.

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad is a 1973 British fantasy film directed by Gordon Hessler and featuring stop motion effects by Ray Harryhausen. It is the second of three Sinbad films released by Columbia Pictures, the others being The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958) and Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977). The film stars John Phillip Law, Tom Baker, Takis Emmanuel and Caroline Munro. It won the first Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film.

The Holes

The Holes (French: Les gaspards) is a 1974 French comedy film written and directed by Pierre Tchernia.

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