Santo Alcalá

Santo Anibal Alcalá (born December 23, 1952) is a former Major League Baseball starting pitcher, born in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic. He batted and threw right-handed during his baseball career. Alcala was signed by the Cincinnati Reds organization as an amateur free agent and initially assigned to the minor leagues.

Santo Alcalá
Pitcher
Born: December 23, 1952 (age 66)
San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 10, 1976, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
September 25, 1977, for the Montreal Expos
MLB statistics
Win–loss record14–11
Earned run average4.76
Strikeouts140
Teams

Major League Baseball career

Alcala made his major league debut on April 10, 1976 with the Cincinnati Reds. Alcala pitched to four batters, giving up four hits and three earned runs in his debut.[1] In 1976, Alcala pitched one shutout. Despite winning 11 games in 1976, Alcala had an earned run average of 4.70, with a strikeout-to-walk ratio of 67–67. While Alcala's team went on to the World Series, Alcala didn't have any playoff appearances. At age 23, Alcala was the second youngest player on an aging 1976 Reds team.[2] In 1977, Alcala had a 5.74 earned run average before being traded to the Expos, where he recorded a 4.69 earned run average. In his final major league appearance, Alcala pitched a scoreless inning in relief, bringing his 1977 earned run average to 4.83.[3]

On May 21, 1977, the Cincinnati Reds traded Alcala to the Montreal Expos for players to be named later. The Expos later sent Shane Rawley and Angel Torres to the Cincinnati Reds to complete the trade. In 1978, Alcala was selected off waivers by the Seattle Mariners, only to be sent back to the Expos in the same year.[4] He never pitched in the major leagues again.

At the time of his retirement Alcala had a 14–11 record, a 4.76 ERA, 121 walks, and 140 strikeouts. Alcala was 8 for 71 hitting, with a lifetime batting average of .113. His lifetime fielding percentage was .978.

References

  1. ^ "Apr 10, 1976, Astros at Reds Box Score and Play by Play". www.baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2008-07-09.
  2. ^ "1976 Cincinnati Reds". www.baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2008-07-09.
  3. ^ "Sep 25, 1977, Phillies at Expos Play by Play and Box Score". www.baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2008-07-09.
  4. ^ "Transactions of Santo Alcala". www.baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2008-07-09.

External links

1952 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1952 throughout the world.

1976 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1976 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds entered the season as the reigning world champs. The Reds dominated the league all season, and won their second consecutive National League West title with a record of 102–60, best record in MLB and finished 10 games ahead of the runner-up Los Angeles Dodgers. They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees. They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants. The Reds drew 2,629,708 fans to their home games at Riverfront Stadium, an all-time franchise attendance record. As mentioned above, the Reds swept through the entire postseason with their sweeps of the Phillies and Yankees, achieving a record of 7-0. As of 2018, the Reds are the only team in baseball history to sweep through an entire postseason since the addition of divisions.

1976 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1976 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 94th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their first National League East title, as they compiled a record of 101–61, nine games ahead of the second-place Pittsburgh Pirates, and won 100 games or more for the first time in franchise history.

The Phillies lost the NLCS, 3–0 to the Cincinnati Reds. Danny Ozark managed the Phillies, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium, where the All-Star Game was played that season.

1977 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1977 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in second place in the National League West, with a record of 88–74, 10 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Reds were managed by Sparky Anderson and played their home games at Riverfront Stadium.

1977 Montreal Expos season

The 1977 Montreal Expos season was the ninth season in the history of the franchise. The team finished fifth in the National League East with a record of 73–87, 26 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies. This was the first year the team played their home games in Olympic Stadium, having left Jarry Park after the 1976 season.

1977 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1977 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 95th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their second consecutive National League East division title with a record of 101–61, five games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Phillies lost the NLCS to the Los Angeles Dodgers, three games to one. The Phillies were managed by Danny Ozark, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

Cincinnati Reds

The Cincinnati Reds are an American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. They were a charter member of the American Association in 1882 and joined the NL in 1890.The Reds played in the NL West division from 1969 to 1993, before joining the Central division in 1994. They have won five World Series titles, nine NL pennants, one AA pennant, and 10 division titles. The team plays its home games at Great American Ball Park, which opened in 2003 replacing Riverfront Stadium. Bob Castellini has been chief executive officer since 2006.

For 1882–2018, the Reds' overall win-loss record is 10,524–10,306 (a 0.505 winning percentage).

Cincinnati Reds all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Cincinnati Reds National League franchise (1890–1953, 1958–present), also known previously as the Cincinnati Red Stockings (1882–1889) and Cincinnati Redlegs (1953–1958).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

List of Major League Baseball players (A)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2018 season, there have been 580 players with a last name that begins with A who have been on a major league roster at some point.

List of Major League Baseball players from the Dominican Republic

This is an alphabetical list of notable baseball players from the Dominican Republic who have played in Major League Baseball since 1950.

Manny Sarmiento

.

Manuel Eduardo Sarmiento Aponte (born February 2, 1956) is a Venezuelan former professional baseball pitcher who played with the Cincinnati Reds (1976–79), Seattle Mariners (1980; 1981 on the disabled list) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1982–83) in Major League Baseball.

Sarmiento played for four years with Cincinnati's "Big Red Machine". While with the Reds, he posted a 14–8 record with 138 strikeouts, six saves, and a 4.12 ERA in 132 appearances (including five as a starting pitcher).

In 1980, Sarmiento was injured while with Seattle, requiring season-ending surgery and more than 18 months of rehabilitation. Sarmiento was traded in 1981 to the Pirates. For part of the season, he switched from the bullpen in an emergency move and had a 9–4 record with 81 strikeouts and 3.39 ERA record before returning to relief duties in the 1983 season.

In a seven-season career, Sarmiento compiled a 26–22 mark with 283 strikeouts and a 3.49 ERA in 513 innings pitched.

Mike Leake

Michael Raymond Leake (born November 12, 1987), is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, and St. Louis Cardinals.

He played college baseball for the Arizona State Sun Devils of Arizona State University. The Reds selected Leake in the first round of the 2009 MLB draft. They promoted him to the major leagues at the start of the 2010 season, without having him pitch in the minor leagues, one of only 21 baseball players to go straight from the draft to the major league team that drafted them. Leake did play for the Peoria Saguaros in the Arizona Fall League in 2009, winning the Arizona Fall League Rising Star Award. Though operated by MLB, the Arizona Fall League is not considered a traditional 'minor league'.

Leake pitched for the Reds through 2015, at which point he was traded to the Giants. A free agent that offseason, he signed with the Cardinals. The Cardinals traded him to the Mariners in 2017.

Mike Lum

Michael Ken-Wai Lum (born October 27, 1945) is a former Major League Baseball player and coach who became the first American of Japanese ancestry to play in the major leagues when he debuted with the Atlanta Braves in 1967. He currently serves as the hitting coach with the GCL Pirates.

Trois-Rivières Aigles

Les Aigles de Trois-Rivières (English: Three Rivers Eagles) was the name of a Canadian minor league baseball franchise representing Trois-Rivières, Quebec, in the Double-A Eastern League between 1971 and 1977. The Eagles were an affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds and played at le Stade Municipal de Trois-Rivières.

Washington Nationals all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Washington Nationals National League franchise (2005–present), also known previously as the Montreal Expos (1969–2004).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

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