Sant Martí d'Empúries

Sant Martí d'Empúries is an entity of the town of L'Escala. It is located next to the ruins of Empúries or Empòrion. Ancient Greeks established the settlement in the 6th century BC.[1] It was the county seat until 1079 Empúries moved to Castelló d'Empúries place less exposed to attack.

Sant Martí d'Empúries
Church of Sant Martí Empúries
Church of Sant Martí Empúries
Flag of Sant Martí d'Empúries

Flag
Sant Martí d'Empúries is located in Catalonia
Sant Martí d'Empúries
Sant Martí d'Empúries
Location in Catalonia
Coordinates: 42°8′23.59″N 3°7′4.48″E / 42.1398861°N 3.1179111°E
Country Spain
Community Catalonia
ProvinceGirona
ComarcaAlt Empordà
Population
 (2007)
 • Total47
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
WebsiteOfficial website

History

It was an inhabited place since the arrival of Greeks from Phocaea in the 6th century BC. Greeks established a settlement there called it, Kypsela (Greek: Κύψελα). At the ancient times there is a possibility that there was a temple of Artemis on the island.[1]

It was Christianized by Saint Feliu, an African martyr who died in 304 in Girona. He was bishop between 516 and 693. Charlemagne mentions Ermenguer as first Count of Empúries in 812.

References

  1. ^ a b Mierse, William E. (November 1999). Temples and Towns in Roman Iberia: The Social and Architectural Dynamics of Sanctuary Designs, from the Third Century B.C. to the Third Century A.D. University of California Press. p. 11. ISBN 978-0520203778.

External links

Archaeology Museum of Catalonia

The Archaeology Museum of Catalonia (Catalan: Museu d'Arqueologia de Catalunya; abbreviated as MAC) was created under the Museums of Catalonia Act in 1990 by the Department of Culture of the Government of Catalonia.

The head office is located in the former Palace of Graphic Arts, which was built on the Montjuïc hill for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition. The pavilion was initially to be dismantled once the event was over, but it was conserved and refitted by the architect Josep Gudiol before the museum opened its doors in 1932.

Castelló d'Empúries

Castelló d'Empúries is a town and municipality in the Alt Empordà in Girona, Catalonia, Spain. It lies 9 km east of Figueres.

In 1079, Castelló d'Empúries became the capital of the Empúries county due to the previous capital, Sant Martí d'Empúries, being too easily sacked by pirates. 1325-1341 saw a period of large expansion of this capital town, which ultimately ceased being the capital once the county joined the Crown of Aragon in 1385.

In 1809 the 113th Regiment de Ligne of Napoleon's Army fought here.The old town is somewhat dwarfed by the neighboring urbanisation of Empuriabrava, on the coastline of the Costa Brava.

Costa Brava

The Costa Brava (Catalan: [ˈkɔstə ˈβɾaβə], Spanish: [ˈkosta ˈβɾaβa]; "Wild Coast" or "Rough Coast") is a coastal region of Catalonia in northeastern Spain, consisting of the comarques (counties) of Alt Empordà, Baix Empordà and Selva in the province of Girona. Costa Brava stretches from the town of Blanes, 60 km (37 mi) northeast of Barcelona, to the French border.

In the 1950s, the Costa Brava was identified by the Spanish government and local entrepreneurs as being suitable for substantial development as a holiday destination, mainly for package holiday tourists from Europe. The combination of a very good summer climate, nature, excellent beaches and a favourable foreign exchange rate (before the creation of the single European currency), which made Costa Brava an attractive tourist destination, was exploited by the construction of large numbers of hotels and apartments in such seaside resorts as Blanes, Tossa de Mar and Lloret de Mar. Tourism rapidly took over from fishing as the principal business of the area.

County of Empúries

The County of Empúries (Catalan: Comtat d'Empúries, IPA: [kumˈtad dəmˈpuɾiəs]), also known as the County of Ampurias (Spanish: Condado de Ampurias), was a medieval county centred on the town of Empúries and enclosing the Catalan region of Peralada. It corresponds to the historic comarca of Empordà.

After the Franks conquered the regions in 785, Empúries and Peralada came under the authority of the County of Girona. Around 813, Empúries, with Peralada, became a separate county under Ermenguer. He and the other early counts were probably of Visigothic origin. In 817, Empúries was merged with the County of Roussillon, a union which lasted until 989. One of the ninth-century counts of Empúries assembled a fleet powerful enough to conquer the Balearic Islands, but only for a brief time. From 835 to 844, Sunyer I ruled Empúries and Peralada while Alaric I ruled Roussillon and Vallespir.

At the death of Gausfred I in 989, Roussillon and Empúries were separated. Gausfred's elder son Hugh I received Empúries while Giselbert I received Roussillon. Hugh's comital dynasty lasted until 1322, when Empúries passed to a collateral branch of his family. The last count, Hugh VI, sold the county to Peter IV of Ribagorza in 1325 in exchange for the barony of Pego and the towns of Xaló and Laguar, all located within the Kingdom of Valencia. Peter later traded it with Ramon Berenguer d'Aragona for the county of Prades in 1341. From that point on, Empúries was an apanage of the Crown of Aragon.

In a letter of December 1002, Pope Sylvester II confirmed the county of Empúries and the "county of Pedralbes" as a part of the diocese of Girona. The latter is probably to be identified with the Peralada region in the north of Empúries. A portion of the "taxes of the port", consisting of dues and anchorage, were passed on to the diocese.

Empordà

Emporda (from the official name in Catalan: Empordà, Catalan pronunciation: [əmpuɾˈða]) is a natural and historical region of Catalonia, Spain, divided since 1936 into two comarques, Alt Empordà and Baix Empordà.

The city of Figueres, an important urban and economic center of the Empordà, was designated the capital of Alt Empordà, while La Bisbal d'Empordà, following a more geographic and historical criteria, became the capital of Baix Empordà.

Empordà has been the cradle for many pictoric schools, with surrealism standing out, including artists such as Salvador Dalí, Angel Planells, Joan Massanet and Evarist Vallès.

Empuriabrava

Empuriabrava (Spanish: Ampuriabrava) is a community in the municipality of Castelló d'Empúries, in the Alt Empordà (Costa Brava, province of Girona, Catalonia, Spain). It is located in the Gulf of Roses, surrounded by the Natural Park of the Aiguamolls de l'Empordà, and is the largest residential marina in Europe, with some 24 km of navigable waterways.

Originally built on a swamp, Empuriabrava was transformed into a tourist community, initially planned in 1964 and completed in 1975. The town has more than 40 km of canals and a seasonal, summer population of around 80,000. The Greco-Roman acropolis of Sant Martí d'Empúries is nearby.

Its aerodrome (ICAO-code LEAP), immediately to the north of the town, offers a variety of air sports with services for all levels of skydiving.

Empúries

Empúries (Catalan: Empúries [əmˈpuɾiəs]) was an ancient city on the Mediterranean coast of Catalonia, Spain. Empúries is also known by its Spanish name, Ampurias (Spanish: Ampurias [amˈpuɾjas]). The city Ἐμπόριον (Greek: Ἐμπόριον, Emporion, meaning "trading place", cf. emporion) was founded in 575 BC by Greek colonists from Phocaea. After the invasion of Gaul from Iberia by Hannibal the Carthaginian general in 218 BC, the city was occupied by the Romans (Latin: Emporiæ). In the Early Middle Ages, the city's exposed coastal position left it open to marauders and it was abandoned.

Empúries is located within the Catalan comarca of Alt Empordà on Costa Brava. The ruins are midway between the town of L'Escala and the tiny village of Sant Martí d'Empúries.

Empúries Marathon

The Empúries Marathon (Catalan:Marató d'Empúries) is a long-distance run (42.195 km) which takes place in Empúries, the ancient Greek and Roman colony, next Sant Martí d'Empúries and L'Escala in Girona (Catalonia). The first edition of the marathon was held in 2003 to mark the collaboration of the City of L'Escala with the Universal Forum of Cultures in Barcelona 2004.Organized by the L'Escala Town Council and with the support of the Catalan Athletics Federation, the Empúries Marathon is held annually in the month of April or May, along with two additional athletics races: the half-marathon and 10,000-meter race. With over 1,847 athletes for the three tests in 2013 edition, the start and finish are performed at the Archaeology Museum of Catalonia-Empúries, and, just before the race started, the runners cross the ancient Greek city of Empúries to the starting position.

Hellenistic period

The Hellenistic period covers the period of Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire as signified by the Battle of Actium in 31 BC and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt the following year. The Ancient Greek word Hellas (Ἑλλάς, Ellás) is the original word for Greece, from which the word Hellenistic was derived.During the Hellenistic period Greek cultural influence and power reached the peak of its geographical expansion, being dominant in the Mediterranean World and most of West and Central Asia, even in parts of the Indian subcontinent, experiencing prosperity and progress in the arts, exploration, literature, theatre, architecture, music, mathematics, philosophy, and science. It is often considered a period of transition, sometimes even of decadence or degeneration, compared to the enlightenment of the Greek Classical era. The Hellenistic period saw the rise of New Comedy, Alexandrian poetry, the Septuagint and the philosophies of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Pyrrhonism. Greek science was advanced by the works of the mathematician Euclid and the polymath Archimedes. The religious sphere expanded to include new gods such as the Greco-Egyptian Serapis, eastern deities such as Attis and Cybele and a syncretism between Hellenistic culture and Buddhism in Bactria and Northwest India.

After Alexander the Great's invasion of the Achaemenid Empire in 330 BC and its disintegration shortly after, the Hellenistic kingdoms were established throughout south-west Asia (Seleucid Empire, Kingdom of Pergamon), north-east Africa (Ptolemaic Kingdom) and South Asia (Greco-Bactrian Kingdom, Indo-Greek Kingdom). The Hellenistic period was characterized by a new wave of Greek colonization which established Greek cities and kingdoms in Asia and Africa. This resulted in the export of Greek culture and language to these new realms, spanning as far as modern-day India. Equally, however, these new kingdoms were influenced by the indigenous cultures, adopting local practices where beneficial, necessary, or convenient. Hellenistic culture thus represents a fusion of the Ancient Greek world with that of the Near East, Middle East, and Southwest Asia. This mixture gave rise to a common Attic-based Greek dialect, known as Koine Greek, which became the lingua franca through the Hellenistic world.

Scholars and historians are divided as to what event signals the end of the Hellenistic era. The Hellenistic period may be seen to end either with the final conquest of the Greek heartlands by Rome in 146 BC following the Achean War, with the final defeat of the Ptolemaic Kingdom at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC, or even the move by Roman emperor Constantine the Great of the capital of the Roman Empire to Constantinople in 330 AD. "Hellenistic" is distinguished from "Hellenic" in that the first encompasses the entire sphere of direct ancient Greek influence, while the latter refers to Greece itself.

List of Bienes de Interés Cultural in the Province of Girona

This is a list of Bien de Interés Cultural landmarks in the Province of Girona, Catalonia, Spain.

List of oldest continuously inhabited cities

This is a list of present-day cities by the time period over which they have been continuously inhabited. The age-claims listed are generally disputed. Differences in opinion can result from different definitions of "city" as well as "continuous habitation" and historical evidence is often disputed. Caveats (and sources) to the validity of each claim are discussed in the "Notes" column.

Palaeopolis

Palaeopolis, Palaiopolis, or Paleopolis (Ancient Greek: Παλαιόπολις,, lit. 'old city'), rarely spelled Palaepolis (Παλαίπολις), can refer to:

the original site of the Greek colony in Italy that became Neapolis, now Naples.

Palaeopolis, Lydia, modern Baliambol in Turkey

Palaeopolis in Pamphylia, now Akören (in Adana province?) in Turkey

Palaiopoli, Andros, in the Cyclades Islands (Greece)

Palaeopolis, an ancient Greek settlement on the island Sant Martí d'Empúries, modern Spain, at the mouth of the Fluvia River next to the ancient Greek city of Empúries, known as Kypsela (Greek: Κύψελα) to the ancients.

Palaeopolis, Corfu, within the estate of Mon Repos on the Ionian Island of Corfu

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