Sandra Miesel

Sandra Louise Miesel (born Sandra Louise Schwartz on November 25, 1941) is an American medievalist, writer and science fiction and fantasy fan. Her early work was science fiction and fantasy criticism, fields in which she has remained active. She is a literary analyst; has described herself as "the world's greatest expert" on Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson,[1] and has written front and back matter for many of Anderson's books.

She is the leading expert on Dickson's Childe Cycle series of novels, and has written a number of commentaries which have been published with the books in that series, including an afterword in The Final Encyclopedia, as well as an essay in The Dorsai Companion. She also worked with Dickson in putting together a detailed timeline of the series, in order to set exact dates for the events and people in the often overlapping stories.

Writing career

Miesel began her writing as a member of science fiction fandom (a connection which sprang from a letter she had published in IF magazine[2]), with critical articles in the science fiction fanzine Yandro, especially on Anderson and Dickson, as well as other fanzines such as Granfalloon. She was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer three times (1973–1975);[3] and had two monographs published by fannish small presses: Myth, Symbol and Religion in The Lord of the Rings. (TK Graphics, 1973); and Against Time's Arrow: The High Crusade of Poul Anderson (Borgo Press, 1978).[4]

Since 1983, Miesel has written hundreds of articles for the Catholic press, chiefly on history, art, and hagiography. She wrote regularly for the now-defunct Crisis Catholic magazine and is a columnist for the diocesan paper of the Diocese of Norwich, Connecticut. Miesel is also a well-known speaker. She has spoken at religious and academic conferences, appeared on EWTN, and given numerous radio interviews.

She has co-authored a book, The Da Vinci Hoax: Exposing the Errors in The Da Vinci Code, a detailed critique of the popular novel based on her knowledge of Catholic history and teachings.

Most recently, she has co-authored a book The Pied Piper of Atheism: Philip Pullman and Children's Fantasy with Catholic journalist and canon lawyer Pete Vere. The book, published by Ignatius Press, offers a detailed critique of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy.[5]

She holds master's degrees in biochemistry and medieval history from the University of Illinois.

Personal life

She lives in the Indianapolis, Indiana area, as did her husband John (a fellow fan[6]), they were married 42 years until his death in 2006[7]

Selected works

  • Miesel, Sandra (1973). Myth, Symbol, and Religion in The Lord of the Rings. T-K Graphics. OCLC: 1242807.
  • Miesel, Sandra (1978). Against Time's Arrow: The High Crusade of Poul Anderson. Borgo Press. ISBN 0-89370-124-6.
  • Miesel, Sandra (1989). SHAMAN. Baen. ISBN 0-671-69844-3. Speculative fiction. An earlier version was published as Dreamrider (Ace Books, 1982).
  • "The Fan As Critic" in Science fiction fandom Joe Sanders, ed. (Contributions to the study of science fiction and fantasy, no. 62) Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994. ISBN 0-313-23380-2
  • Olson, Carl E.; Sandra Miesel (2004). The Da Vinci Hoax: Exposing the Errors in The Da Vinci Code. Ignatius Press. ISBN 1-58617-034-1.

References

  1. ^ "Catholics & Science Fiction: An Interview with Sandra Miesel". Ignatius Insight. http://ignatiusinsight.com. Retrieved January 19, 2011. External link in |publisher= (help)
  2. ^ "Catholics & Science Fiction: An Interview with Sandra Miesel". Ignatius Insight. http://ignatiusinsight.com. Retrieved January 19, 2011. External link in |publisher= (help)
  3. ^ Hugo Nominees Database
  4. ^ Reid, Robin Anne. Women in Science Fiction and Fantasy: Volume 1: Overviews Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2009; p. 284
  5. ^ Miesel, Sandra and Pete Vere. "Pied Piper of Atheism: Philip Pullman and Children's Fantasy". www.AtheismForChildren.com. http://www.ignatius.com/. Archived from the original on May 16, 2008. Retrieved October 22, 2010. External link in |publisher= (help)
  6. ^ Burton, David. "'Credentials?' We Don't Need No Stinkin' Credentials" Catchpenny Gazette #1 (February 2004), p. 2
  7. ^ Silver, Steven H. "News: Obituary" SF Site September 2006

External links

Carl E. Olson

Carl E. Olson (born April 17, 1969) is an American non-fiction author.

Criticism of The Da Vinci Code

The Da Vinci Code, a popular suspense novel by Dan Brown, generated criticism and controversy after its publication in 2003. Many of the complaints centered on the book's speculations and misrepresentations of core aspects of Christianity and the history of the Catholic Church. Additional criticisms were directed towards the book's inaccurate descriptions of European art, history, architecture, and geography.Charges of copyright infringement were also leveled by the novelist Lewis Perdue and by the authors of the 1982 book The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, which puts forward the hypothesis that the historical Jesus married Mary Magdalene, and that their children or their descendants emigrated to what is now southern France, and married into families that became the Merovingian dynasty, whose claim to the throne of France is championed today by the Priory of Sion. Brown was cleared of these copyright infringement charges in a 2006 trial.

Dickson!

Dickson! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by NESFA Press in 1984 and was issued in honor of Dickson's appearance as guest of honor at the 42nd World Science Fiction Convention. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines SFWA Bulletin, Astounding, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and Science Fiction Stories. The book contains introduction to each story by Sandra Miesel.

Forward!

Forward! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 1985, and was edited by Sandra Miesel. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Galaxy Science Fiction, Other Worlds, Fantasy and Science Fiction and Orbit.

Granfalloon (fanzine)

Granfalloon was a science fiction fanzine published by Linda Bushyager. It was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine in 1972, losing to Locus; and 1973 (losing to Energumen).

The first issue was published in 1966 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Suzanne Tompkins was co-editor for the first six issues. Twenty issues of Granfalloon were released, the last one in July 1976.Contributors included Piers Anthony, Alicia Austin, Bill Bowers, Ron Bushyager, Grant Canfield, Don D'Ammassa, Steve Fabian, Alexis Gilliland, Mike Glicksohn, Terry Jeeves, Arnie Katz, Tim Kirk, Damon Knight, Frank Lunney, Sandra Miesel, Ron Miller, Andrew J. Offutt, Andrew I. Porter, Bill Rotsler, Robert Silverberg, Darrell Schweitzer, Mae Strelkov, Bob Tucker, Harry Warner, Jr., Ted White, Susan Wood and Roger Zelazny.Suzanne Tompkins went on to publish the fanzine The Spanish Inquisition with Jerry Kaufman in the 1970s.Bushyager also published the fanzine Kardass in the 1970s.

Hoka!

Hoka! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writers Poul Anderson and Gordon Dickson. It was first published by Wallaby in 1983. The stories originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction and Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer

The Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer is the Hugo Award given each year for writers of works related to science fiction or fantasy which appeared in low- or non-paying publications such as semiprozines or fanzines or in generally available electronic media during the previous calendar year. There is no restriction that the writer is not also a professional author, and several such authors have won the award for their non-paying works. The award was first presented in 1967 and has been awarded annually.

During the 58 regular and retro nomination years, 98 writers have been nominated; 21 of these have won, including ties. David Langford has received the largest number of awards, with 21 wins out of 31 nominations. He was nominated every year from 1979 through 2009, and won 19 times in a row from 1989 through 2007. The other writers to win more than once are Richard E. Geis, with seven wins out of sixteen nominations; Mike Glyer, with four wins out of twenty-five nominations; Susan Wood Glicksohn, with three of eight; Harry Warner, Jr., with two out of eight; Wilson Tucker, with two out of seven; Bob Shaw, who won both times he was nominated; Forrest J Ackerman, with two out of four Retro Hugos; and Ray Bradbury, who won both Retro Hugos he was nominated for. The writers with the most nominations without winning are Evelyn C. Leeper, who was nominated twelve times in a row from 1990 through 2001, and Steven H Silver, whose twelve nominations span 2000-2013.

Invaders!

Invaders! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 1985 and was edited by Sandra Miesel. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Astounding, Cosmos, Orbit, Planet Stories, If, Fantasy and Science Fiction and Space Stories.

Magic in Ithkar 4

Magic in Ithkar 4 is a shared world anthology of fantasy stories edited by Andre Norton and Robert Adams. It was first published as a paperback by Tor Books in July 1987.

Margaret Starbird

Margaret Starbird (born 18 June 1942) is the author of seven books arguing for the existence of a secret Christian tradition that held Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene, calling it the "Grail heresy", after having set out to discredit the bloodline hypothesis contained in The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail.

Steel Brother

Steel Brother is a collection of science fiction stories by Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Tor Books in 1985 and reprints most of the stories from Dickson's 1984 collection Dickson!, with one substitution and one added interview. The stories originally appeared in the magazines SFWA Bulletin, Astounding, Galaxy Science Fiction, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and Science Fiction Stories. The book contains the introduction to each story by Sandra Miesel from the previous collection, though they are not credited.

Survival!

Survival! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 1984. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Astounding, Fantasy and Science Fiction, If, Imagination, Fantastic, Infinity Science Fiction, Future and Venture

The Da Vinci Hoax

The Da Vinci Hoax is a non-fiction book written by Carl E. Olsen and Sandra Miesel for the express purpose of critiquing Dan Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code. The book was first published in 2004 by Ignatius Press. According to Olson and Miesel, they wrote it out of concern that Brown's novel is popularizing unfounded theories and misrepresentations of history and beliefs, which are used as the basis of the novel's plot, and defended by its author as factual, and that purport to expose Christianity as founded on lies that have been kept secret by the Roman Catholic Church throughout the centuries.

The authors state that the theories, while presented as great revelations of hidden knowledge, are actually based on elements of gnostic and feminist ideas. They contend that the theories transparently contradict serious scholarship, and present detailed arguments and expositions against them.

The Dorsai Companion

The Dorsai Companion is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson, part of his Childe Cycle series. It was first published by Ace Books in 1986. The collection includes a number of articles by Sandra Miesel.

The Magic Goes Away

The Magic Goes Away is a fantasy short story written by Larry Niven in 1976, and later expanded to a novella of the same name which was published in 1978. While these works were not the first in the "Magic Universe" or "Warlock" series, they marked a turning point after the 1973 oil crisis and Niven's subsequent transformation of the series into an allegory for a modern-day energy crisis. The setting was later used as a backdrop for a series of full-length novels, The Burning City (2000) and its sequel, Burning Tower (2005), which were co-written with Jerry Pournelle.

The Many Worlds of Poul Anderson

The Many Worlds of Poul Anderson is a collection of science fiction short stories by American writer Poul Anderson, edited by Roger Elwood, first published in hardcover by Chilton in June 1974. A paperback edition retitled The Book of Poul Anderson followed from DAW Books in June 1975, and was reprinted in June 1978, December 1978, and October 1983. Most of the pieces were originally published between 1947 and 1971 in the magazines Astounding Science Fiction, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Analog, Riverside Quarterly, and Other Worlds Science Stories. The others are original to the collection.The book contains eight short fictions and essays by Anderson and others, two of them co-authored, together with an introduction by the editor.

The Psychotechnic League

The Psychotechnic League is a future history created by American science fiction writer Poul Anderson. The name "Psychotechnic League" was coined by Sandra Miesel in the early 1980s, to capitalize on Anderson's better-known Polesotechnic League future history. Anderson published 21 novels, novellas and short stories set in this future between 1949 and 1957, with a 22nd published in 1968.

Anderson did not write the stories in chronological order; instead, as Robert A. Heinlein did with his own Future History stories, he wrote whichever story in the series he wanted to, and trusted his readers to make the connections between them. Anderson included a series timeline in the Winter 1955 issue of Startling Stories to accompany the novella "The Snows of Ganymede".

By the late 1950s, Anderson's political beliefs had altered to the point where he was uncomfortable with the political philosophy underlying the series, and he abandoned it. In particular, he had completely reversed his earlier strong support for the United Nations as the nucleus of a world government, a stance which formed the main plot element of several earlier stories in the series.

The Wheels of If

"The Wheels of If" is an alternate history science fiction story by American writer L. Sprague de Camp. It was first published in the magazine Unknown Fantasy Fiction for October, 1940, and first appeared in book form in de Camp's collection The Wheels of If and Other Science Fiction (Shasta, 1940). It later appeared in the paperback edition of the collection published by Berkley Books in 1970, in de Camp's subsequent collections The Virgin & the Wheels (Popular Library, 1976) and Years in the Making: the Time-Travel Stories of L. Sprague de Camp (NESFA Press, 2005), and in the anthology Unknown Worlds: Tales from Beyond (Galahad Books, 1989). It also appeared, together with a sequel by Harry Turtledove, in The Pugnacious Peacemaker/The Wheels of If (Tor Books, 1990) and Down in the Bottomlands and Other Places (Baen Books, 1999). The story has also been translated into German.

The Year of the Quiet Sun

The Year of the Quiet Sun is a 1970 science fiction novel by American writer Wilson Tucker, dealing with the use of forward time travel to ascertain future political and social events. It won a retrospective John W. Campbell Memorial Award in 1976. It was also nominated for a Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1970, and a Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1971.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.