San José del Cabo

San José del Cabo (Spanish pronunciation: [san xo'se ðel 'kaβo], Saint Joseph of the Cape) is a city located in southern Baja California Sur state, Mexico. It is the seat of Los Cabos Municipality lying at a shallow bay 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Cabo San Lucas on the Gulf of California. The city has a population of 93,069 as of 2015.[3] San José del Cabo together with Cabo San Lucas are known as Los Cabos. Together they form a metropolitan area of 305,983 inhabitants.[3]

The two cities are served by Los Cabos International Airport.

San José del Cabo

Añiñi
Downtown San José del Cabo (2012)
Downtown San José del Cabo (2012)
San José del Cabo is located in Baja California Sur
San José del Cabo
San José del Cabo
Coordinates: 23°03′41″N 109°42′29″W / 23.06139°N 109.70806°WCoordinates: 23°03′41″N 109°42′29″W / 23.06139°N 109.70806°W
Country Mexico
StateBaja California Sur
MunicipalityLos Cabos
Elevation
45 m (148 ft)
Population
 (2015[3])[4]
 • City93,069[3]
 • Metro
305,983
Time zoneUTC−7 (MST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)

Population

In the 2015 census, it had a population of 93,069.[3] Together with neighboring Cabo San Lucas, it forms a major tourist destination for travelers, with over 900,000 hotel guests in 2011.[5]

The Mission San José del Cabo was founded in 1730 on the west bank of the nearby Río San José. The Río San José flows into an estuary, the largest body of fresh water in southern Baja California Sur, after flowing largely underground for 39.1 kilometres (24.3 mi) from its origin in the Sierra de la Laguna (Laguna Mountains). For more than 250 years it has furnished drinking and irrigation water for the town of San Jose del Cabo, beginning as a source of fresh water for Spanish galleons traveling back from the Philippines.[6] The river used to flow above ground until the beginning of the 20th century due to anthropogenic causes.[7] A one km long sand bar separates the estuary from what early Spanish explorers, including Sebastian Vizcaino, called the Bahía de San Bernabé or Bay of San Bernabé and now San José del Cabo Bay.[8]

San José del Cabo is one of two places where the rare and possibly extinct rice rat Oryzomys peninsulae has been found.[9]

Climate

San José del Cabo, like almost all of the Baja California peninsula, has an arid climate (Köppen BWh) although it does receive more rainfall than most areas further north due to tropical cyclones occasionally coming in from the south and bringing very heavy falls such as 340 millimetres (13.4 in) on the first of September 1998 and 316 millimetres (12.4 in) on 3 November 1993. Overall, however, rainfall is some of the most erratic anywhere in the world due to this influence, and many years pass by without significant falls at all.

The sea experiences lows of 72–73 °F (22–23 °C) in winter, and highs of 77–84 °F (25–29 °C) during the summer months.[10]

Average Sea Temperature
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
73 °F

23 °C

72 °F

22 °C

72 °F

22 °C

72 °F

22 °C

73 °F

23 °C

77 °F

25 °C

81 °F

27 °C

84 °F

29 °C

84 °F

29 °C

84 °F

29 °C

81 °F

27 °C

77 °F

25 °C

Demographics

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1990 13,302—    
1995 21,737+63.4%
2000 —    
2005 —    
2010 69,788—    
2015 93,069+33.4%
[12]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Los Cabos". Enciclopedia de los Municipios y Delegaciones de México. Mexico: INAFED. 2010. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  2. ^ John Howells and Don Merwin (2007). Choose Mexico for retirement. Guilford, CT: The Globe Pequot Press. p. 182. ISBN 9780762743926.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Poblacion Por Municipio, Superficie, Densidad De Poblacion" (PDF). Retrieved 2018-07-21.
  4. ^ "San Jose del Cabo". Censo de Población y Vivienda 2010 (in Spanish). INEGI. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  5. ^ "Ranking of World Tourism" (PDF) (in Spanish). Consejo de Promoción Turística de México. 2011. p. 2. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  6. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica, Second edition, 1778, Edinburgh, page 1580. Scan of page can be found at http://www.hyzercreek.com/britannica.htm
  7. ^ José Luis León de la Luz, Raymundo Domínguez Cadena, Miguel Domínguez León, and José Juan Pérez Navarro (September 1997). "Floristic Composition of the San José del Cabo Oasis, Baja California Sur, México". SIDA, Contributions to Botany. 17 (3): 599–614. JSTOR 41967252.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  8. ^ Peter Masten Dunne. University of California Press. pp. 4–. GGKEY:FK94TH92Q55.
  9. ^ Carleton, M.D. and Arroyo-Cabrales, J. 2009. Review of the Oryzomys couesi complex (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) in Western Mexico. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 331:94–127.
  10. ^ "December Climate History for San Jose Del Cabo | Local | Mexico". Myweather2.com. Retrieved 2018-07-21.
  11. ^ "Normales climatológicas 1951-2010. Estado: Baja California Sur. Estacion: San Jose del Cabo" (in Spanish). Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2013.
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-09-15. Retrieved 2014-09-15.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
Baja California Sur

Baja California Sur (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbaxa kaliˈfoɾnja suɾ] (listen), English: "South Lower California"), officially the Estado Libre y Soberano de Baja California Sur (English: Free and Sovereign State of South Lower California), is the second-smallest Mexican state by population and the 31st admitted state of the 31 states which, with Mexico City, make up the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico.

Before becoming a state on 8 October 1974, the area was known as the El Territorio Sur de Baja California ("South Territory of Lower California"). It has an area of 73,909 km2 (28,536 sq mi), or 3.57% of the land mass of Mexico, and occupies the southern half of the Baja California Peninsula, south of the 28th parallel, plus the uninhabited Rocas Alijos in the Pacific Ocean. It is bordered to the north by the state of Baja California, to the west by the Pacific Ocean, and to the east by the Gulf of California, or the "Sea of Cortés". The state has maritime borders with Sonora and Sinaloa to the east, across the Gulf of California.

The state is home to the tourist resorts of Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo. Its largest city and capital is La Paz.

Battle of San José del Cabo

The Battle of San José del Cabo was a military engagement of the Mexican–American War which took place on two November days in 1847, after the fall of Mexico City.

Cabo San Lucas

Cabo San Lucas (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkaβo san ˈlukas], "Saint Luke Cape"), or simply Cabo, is a resort city at the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula, in the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. As of 2015, the population of the city was 81,111 inhabitants. Cabo San Lucas together with San José del Cabo is known as Los Cabos. Together they form a metropolitan area of 305,983 inhabitants.Cabo has been rated as one of Mexico's top 5 tourist destinations; it is known for its beaches, scuba diving locations, balnearios, the sea arch El Arco de Cabo San Lucas, and marine life. The Los Cabos Corridor has become a heavily trafficked vacation destination for tourists, with numerous resorts and timeshares along the coast between Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo.

Cabo houses a range of wildlife, including rays, sharks, birds, and a range of fish, such as mahi-mahi (dorado), and striped marlin.

Francisco Palacios Miranda

Francisco Palacios Miranda was the Governor and Military Commandant of the Baja California Territory from 1844 to 1847. He is known for his cooperation with the Americans during the Mexican American War, accepting neutrality of his Territory in 1846 and making the abject surrender of La Paz to the Americans in 1847. For this he was declared a traitor and forced into exile at the end of the war.

On August 17, 1846, Commodore of the Pacific Squadron, Robert F. Stockton proclaimed: "...having by right of conquest taken possession of that territory known by the name of Upper and Lower California do now declare it to be a territory of the United States under the name of the Territory of California." Holding only part of Alta California and no part of the Territory of Baja California, Stockton was overstating the facts in the extreme. To carry out his intent to blockade the West coast of Mexico and to in fact control Baja California, on August 19, Stockton ordered the blockade of San Blas and Mazatlán. While stopping at La Paz, on the southeast corner of Baja California, and San José del Cabo, at the southern tip of the peninsula, Commander Samuel F. Du Pont, commander of the second-class sloop-of-war Cyane secured a promise of neutrality from Colonel Miranda. This allowed the American Navy to seize ships in the ports and get water and provisions there to support their blockade of the other Mexican ports on the west coast of the mainland.

Receiving this report of weakness from Du Pont, returning to San Francisco from the blockade in October, Stockton on February 2, 1847 ordered Commander John B. Montgomery on the first-class sloop-of-war Portsmouth to reestablish the blockade at Mazatlán and to raise the United States flag at San José del Cabo, La Paz, Pichilinque and Loreto. After reimposing a blockade at Mazatlán Montgomery sailed for Baja California. On April 14, Colonel Miranda surrendered La Paz and in effect all of Baja California to the Americans. A committee of residents soon afterward signed articles of capitulation which granted them United States citizen rights and the retention of their own officials and laws, as had been offered by the Americans before in Alta California.

However, as in Alta California, patriotic bajacalifornios were not ready to quietly surrender. On February 15, a council meeting of resistors at Santa Anita, north of San José del Cabo, declared Miranda a traitor and named Mauricio Castro Cota, of San José del Cabo, as his successor.On November 16, 1847 Mexican forces under Manuel Pineda, made a sudden assault on the U.S. Army garrison at La Paz but failed to take the town. However, as they withdrew on the 17th, they burned ex-Governor Miranda's town house. At the end of the Mexican American War, in early August, 1848 the 1st Regiment of New York Volunteers occupying Baja California were ordered to return to Alta California to be discharged. They were accompanied by over 130 refugees from La Paz and 350 from San José. Among the refugees was ex-governor Francisco Palacios Miranda, forced to abandon his lands and property.

José Antonio Mijares

José Antonio Mijares (1819–1847) was a Mexican Army Lieutenant who led the Mexican resistance force against the American garrison of San José del Cabo in the Battle of San José del Cabo where he was killed leading the assault.

List of television stations in Baja California Sur

The following is a list of all IFT-licensed over-the-air television stations broadcasting in the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. There are 19 television stations in Baja California Sur which are either independent or affiliated to Televisa or TV Azteca.

Los Cabos International Airport

Los Cabos International Airport (IATA: SJD, ICAO: MMSD) is the sixth-busiest airport in Mexico and one the Top 30 in Latin America, located at San José del Cabo in Los Cabos Municipality, Baja California Sur state, Mexico.

The airport serves San José del Cabo, Cabo San Lucas, and the Los Cabos area.

Los Cabos Municipality

Los Cabos (Spanish pronunciation: [los ˈkaβos]) is a municipality located at the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California Peninsula, in the state of Baja California Sur. It encompasses the two towns of Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo (the municipal seat) linked by a twenty-mile Resort Corridor of beach-front properties and championship golf courses. The area was remote and rural until the latter 20th century, when the Mexican government began to develop Cabo San Lucas for tourism, which then spread east to the municipal seat. The main draw is the climate and geography, where desert meets the sea, along with sport fishing, resorts and golf. This tourism is by far the main economic activity with over two million visitors per year. Over 1 million visit from the United States.

Manuel Pineda Munoz

Manuel Pineda Munoz (1804–1891), Mexican Army officer that led the Mexican resistance to the forces of the United States in Baja California Sur, during the Mexican–American War. Victor of the Battle of Mulege, he inspired the resistance force of bajacalifornios to attack and then besiege La Paz and attack San José del Cabo. Although he was eventually defeated and later captured at San Antonio de la Sierra, the protracted resistance he led made the American hold on the Baja California peninsula unsecure and prompted American statesman to omit in the final peace treaty, their original demand for the annexation of Baja California and Baja California Sur.

Mexican Federal Highway 1D

Federal Highway 1D (Spanish: Carretera Federal 1D, Fed. 1D) is a tolled (Spanish: cuota) part of the Mexico Federal Highways, paralleling Fed. 1. There are two segments, one in the state of Baja California and another in the state of Baja California Sur.

Misión Estero de las Palmas de San José del Cabo Añuití

Mission San José del Cabo (est. 1730) was the southernmost of the Jesuit missions on the Baja California peninsula, located near the modern city of San José del Cabo in Baja California Sur, Mexico.

The southern cape of the Baja California peninsula had been an often-visited landmark for Spanish navigators (as well as English privateers) for nearly two centuries when a mission was finally established at the Pericú settlement of Añuití in 1730 by Nicolá Tamaral. The Río San José, or San José River, stops just shy of the ocean, with a one km long sand bar creating an estuary, the third largest in Mexico. This pooling of brackish water has created an oasis in the surrounding Sarcocaule desert. The Río San José flows largely underground for 40 kilometres (25 mi) from its origin in the Sierra de la Laguna (Laguna Mountains). For more than 250 years it has furnished drinking and irrigation water for the town of San Jose del Cabo, beginning as a source of fresh water for Spanish galleons traveling back from the Philippines. Over the sand bar from the estuary is a bay referred to by early Spanish explorers, including Sebastian Vizcaino, as the Bahía de San Bernabé or Bay of San Bernabé (now the Bay of San José del Cabo). Initially located near the beach, the station was subsequently moved inland about 8 kilometers. The mission was founded in 1730 on the west bank of the nearby Río San José, and its full name is taken for the life-giving freshwater estuary.

In 1734 the Pericú Revolt broke out, Tamaral was killed, and the mission was destroyed. In 1735–1736, the reestablished outpost was moved back closer to the coast, but it served as a visita for Mission Santiago and as the site of a Spanish presidio. In 1753, San José del Cabo was again moved inland. In 1795, under the Dominicans, the surviving native population of Mission Santiago was transferred to San José del Cabo. The mission was finally closed in 1840.

Misión Santiago de Los Coras

Mission Santiago was founded by the Italian Jesuit Ignacio María Nápoli in 1724 and financed by the Marqués de Villapuente de la Peña and his wife the Marquesa de las Torres de Rada, at the native settlement of Aiñiní, about 40 kilometers north of San José del Cabo in the Cape Region of Baja California Sur, Mexico.

The mission took part of its name from the "Coras," the native people of the region. William C. Massey (1949) interpreted the Jesuit historical sources as indicating that the Coras were a Guaycura-speaking group, but a reexamination of the evidence favors the view that the name was a synonym for "Pericú" (Laylander 1997).

Mission Santiago was the first target of the Pericú Revolt in 1734. Its missionary, Lorenzo José Carranco, was killed, and the buildings were sacked. Rebuilding was begun in 1734, but the mission was ultimately abandoned during the Dominican period in 1795, and its remaining neophytes were relocated to San José del Cabo.

Pericú language

Pericú is the extinct and essentially unattested language of the Pericú people who lived at the southern tip of Baja California. Jesuit missionaries recognized it as distinct from Waikuri (Guaycura) immediately to the north. It was spoken in the mountainous area around the mission of San José del Cabo, on the southeastern coast from Santiago to La Paz, and on the islands off the east coast as far north as Isla San José.

Data is extremely limited, amounting to only four words and ten place names.

San Jose Airport

San Jose Airport may refer to:

San José International Airport an international airport in San Jose, California, United States

Juan Santamaría International Airport, an international airport serving in San José, Costa Rica

Los Cabos International Airport, an international airport in San José del Cabo, Mexico

San Jose Airport (Mindoro), a domestic airport in San Jose, Occidental Mindoro, Philippines

San José Airport (Guatemala), an airport being constructed in Puerto San José, Guatemala

Santiago, Baja California Sur

Santiago (Spanish [santia'go] ;previously Aiñiní) is a small town in Los Cabos Municipality in Baja California Sur, Mexico, located on Mexico's Highway 1, about an hour's drive north of San José del Cabo. Like Todos Santos it is almost directly on top of the Tropic of Cancer. It is also home of the only zoo in Baja California Sur.

The Misión Santiago de Los Coras in Aiñiní was founded in 1724 by the Jesuit missionary, Ignacio Maria Napoli, and closed in 1795; the subsequent Church of Santiago Apostol was built nearby.

Siege of San José del Cabo

The Siege of San José del Cabo, from January to February 1848, was a prolonged battle of the Mexican–American War in which Mexican militia besieged a smaller force of American marines, sailors and Californio militia. The final engagement during the battle involved half of the American garrison, and a landing party from a reinforcing warship, which successfully lifted the siege.

XHESJC-FM

XHESJC-FM is a radio station on 93.1 FM in San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur.

XHPSJC-FM

XHPSJC-FM is a radio station on 89.1 FM in San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur. It is owned by CPS Media and is known as Radiante FM.

XHSJS-FM

XHSJS-FM is a radio station on 96.3 FM in San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur. The station is known as Cabo Mil.

Climate data for San José del Cabo
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 37.0
(98.6)
38.0
(100.4)
39.0
(102.2)
39.0
(102.2)
40.0
(104.0)
38.0
(100.4)
39.0
(102.2)
42.0
(107.6)
42.0
(107.6)
41.0
(105.8)
40.0
(104.0)
39.0
(102.2)
42.0
(107.6)
Average high °C (°F) 25.8
(78.4)
26.4
(79.5)
27.4
(81.3)
29.1
(84.4)
30.9
(87.6)
32.6
(90.7)
33.8
(92.8)
33.9
(93.0)
33.4
(92.1)
32.3
(90.1)
30.1
(86.2)
26.9
(80.4)
30.2
(86.4)
Daily mean °C (°F) 18.9
(66.0)
19.2
(66.6)
20.1
(68.2)
21.9
(71.4)
24.0
(75.2)
26.5
(79.7)
28.5
(83.3)
28.9
(84.0)
28.2
(82.8)
26.2
(79.2)
23.2
(73.8)
20.2
(68.4)
23.8
(74.8)
Average low °C (°F) 12.0
(53.6)
12.0
(53.6)
12.8
(55.0)
14.8
(58.6)
17.1
(62.8)
20.5
(68.9)
23.3
(73.9)
23.8
(74.8)
23.0
(73.4)
20.1
(68.2)
16.3
(61.3)
13.4
(56.1)
17.4
(63.3)
Record low °C (°F) 1.5
(34.7)
2.0
(35.6)
5.0
(41.0)
6.0
(42.8)
9.0
(48.2)
11.0
(51.8)
11.5
(52.7)
11.0
(51.8)
11.0
(51.8)
11.0
(51.8)
9.2
(48.6)
3.0
(37.4)
1.5
(34.7)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 13.1
(0.52)
5.3
(0.21)
1.3
(0.05)
1.0
(0.04)
0.3
(0.01)
0.9
(0.04)
20.5
(0.81)
53.6
(2.11)
112.5
(4.43)
42.9
(1.69)
25.2
(0.99)
11.4
(0.45)
288.0
(11.34)
Average rainy days 1.4 0.6 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.1 1.4 3.0 3.9 2.0 0.8 1.1 14.6
Source: Servicio Meteorológico National[11]
Municipalities and
municipal seats

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.