San Bruno, California

San Bruno is a city in San Mateo County, California, United States, incorporated in 1914. The population was 41,114 at the 2010 United States Census. The city is located between South San Francisco and Millbrae, adjacent to San Francisco International Airport and Golden Gate National Cemetery, and is approximately 12 miles (19 km) south of downtown San Francisco.

San Bruno
City of San Bruno
San Bruno looking toward San Francisco Bay (2006)
San Bruno looking toward San Francisco Bay (2006)
San Bruno city seal

Seal
Motto(s): 
"City with a Heart"[1]
Location in San Mateo County and the state of California
Location in San Mateo County and the state of California
San Bruno is located in the US
San Bruno
San Bruno
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 37°37′31″N 122°25′31″W / 37.62528°N 122.42528°WCoordinates: 37°37′31″N 122°25′31″W / 37.62528°N 122.42528°W[2]
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountySan Mateo
RegionSan Francisco Bay Area
RegionNorthern California
IncorporatedDecember 23, 1914[3]
Government
 • MayorRico E. Medina [4]
Area
 • Total5.46 sq mi (14.14 km2)
 • Land5.46 sq mi (14.14 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)  0%
Elevation20 ft (6 m)
Population
 • Total41,114
 • Estimate 
(2016)[8]
42,957
 • Density7,866.14/sq mi (3,037.03/km2)
Time zoneUTC−8 (Pacific)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (PDT)
ZIP Codes
94066, 94067, 94096, 94098
Area code650
FIPS code06-65028
GNIS feature IDs277616, 2411778
Websitesanbruno.ca.gov
Policeplazasanbruno
The San Bruno police station next to the BART station at the Shops at Tanforan.

Geography

The city is located between South San Francisco and Millbrae, adjacent to San Francisco International Airport and Golden Gate National Cemetery, and is approximately 12 miles (19 km) south of downtown San Francisco.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.5 square miles (14 km2), all of it land. The city spreads from the mostly flat lowlands near San Francisco Bay into the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains, which rise to more than 600 feet (180 m) above sea level in Crestmoor and more than 700 feet (210 m) above sea level in Portola Highlands. San Bruno City Hall sits at an official elevation of 41 feet (12.5 m) above sea level.

Portions of Mills Park, Crestmoor, and Rollingwood are very hilly, featuring canyons and ravines. Creeks, many of them now in culverts, flow from springs in the hills toward San Francisco Bay. Just west of Skyline Boulevard and outside of city limits is San Andreas Lake, which got its name from the San Andreas Fault. The lake is one of several reservoirs used by the San Francisco Water Department, providing water to San Francisco and several communities in San Mateo County, including San Bruno west of I-280.

Climate

CrestmoorSnow
Rare snowfall in Crestmoor, February 5, 1976

San Bruno enjoys a mild Mediterranean climate characterized by cool, dry summers and chilly, wet winters.

Since 1927, the National Weather Service (formerly the U.S. Weather Bureau) has maintained a weather station at the nearby San Francisco International Airport (formerly Mills Field). According to the official records, January is the coldest month with an average high of 55.9 °F (13.3 °C) and an average low of 42.9 °F (6.1 °C).

Frost occurs occasionally during the winter months; snowfall is very rare, but 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) fell on January 21, 1962 (with as much as four inches (10 cm) reported in Crestmoor). Measurable snowfalls also occurred on December 11, 1932, and February 5, 1976. In recent years, traces of snow have been reported on December 27, 1988; January 8, 1989; and February 24, 1996.

Freezing temperatures occur on an average of only 1.3 days annually. The coldest winter temperature on record was 20 °F (−7 °C) on December 11, 1932, the same day 1.0 inch (2.5 cm) of snow fell. A week-long cold spell in December 1972 caused hard freezes throughout the area, damaging trees and plants and causing some water pipes to break; the temperature dropped as low as 24 °F (−4 °C) at the airport and 20 °F (−7 °C) in Crestmoor, which also reported snow flurries several times that week.

September is the warmest month with an average high of 72.7 °F (22.6 °C) and an average low of 55.1 °F (12.8 °C). Temperatures exceed 90 °F (32 °C) on an average of 4.0 days annually. Fog and low overcast are common during the night and morning hours in the summer months, which are generally very dry except for occasional light drizzle from the fog. On rare occasions moisture moving up from tropical storms has produced thunderstorms or showers in the summer. Gusty westerly winds are also common in the afternoon during the summer. The highest summer temperature was 106 °F (41 °C) on June 14, 1961, breaking a record of 104 °F (40 °C) set in June 1960. A high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded on July 17, 1988, and a high of 104 °F (40 °C) was recorded on September 1, 2017. Until August 1, 1993, it had never reached 100 °F (38 °C) in August, which is one of the foggier months in the area. Due to thermal inversions, summer temperatures in the higher hills are often much higher than at the airport.

SanBruno
San Bruno looking toward San Francisco Bay in 2006

Thunderstorms occur several times a year, mostly during the winter months, but are usually quite brief. Total annual precipitation, most of which falls from November to April, ranges from 20.11 inches (511 mm) at the nearby National Weather Service station at San Francisco International Airport to over 32 inches (810 mm) in the higher hills (according to observations by Gayle Rucker for the Army Corps of Engineers and Robert E. Nylund for the U.S. Geological Survey from 1962 to 1985). Nylund also took temperature observations for several years and published weekly weather reports in the San Bruno Herald from 1966 to 1969, which were included in official reports for the Golden Gate National Cemetery. The annual average days with measurable precipitation is 65.2 days. The most rainfall in a month at the airport was 13.64 inches (346 mm) in February 1998, and the most rainfall in 24 hours was 5.59 inches (142 mm) on January 4, 1982. Nylund reported 6.09 inches (155 mm) in Crestmoor during a 24-hour period in January 1967. Winter storms are often accompanied by strong southerly winds.[9]

Climate data for San Bruno, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 55.9
(13.3)
59.3
(15.2)
61.2
(16.2)
64.3
(17.9)
66.8
(19.3)
69.9
(21.1)
71.1
(21.7)
71.7
(22.1)
72.7
(22.6)
69.7
(20.9)
62.0
(16.7)
56.1
(13.4)
65.1
(18.4)
Average low °F (°C) 42.9
(6.1)
45.5
(7.5)
46.8
(8.2)
48.1
(8.9)
50.5
(10.3)
52.9
(11.6)
54.5
(12.5)
55.5
(13.1)
55.1
(12.8)
52.4
(11.3)
47.5
(8.6)
43.0
(6.1)
49.6
(9.8)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 4.45
(113)
4.01
(102)
3.26
(83)
1.18
(30)
0.38
(9.7)
0.11
(2.8)
0.03
(0.76)
0.07
(1.8)
0.20
(5.1)
1.04
(26)
2.49
(63)
2.89
(73)
20.11
(511)
Source: "Climatography of the United States", National Climatic Data Center (www.ncdc.noaa.gov)[10]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19201,562
19303,610131.1%
19406,51980.6%
195012,47891.4%
196029,063132.9%
197036,25424.7%
198035,417−2.3%
199038,96110.0%
200040,1653.1%
201041,1142.4%
Est. 201642,957[8]4.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

2010

The 2010 United States Census[12] reported that San Bruno had a population of 41,114. The population density was 7,505.0 people per square mile (2,897.7/km²). The racial makeup of San Bruno was 20,350 (49.5%) White, 942 (2.3%) African American, 246 (0.6%) Native American, 10,423 (25.4%) Asian, 1,377 (3.3%) Pacific Islander, 5,075 (12.3%) from other races, and 2,701 (6.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12,016 persons (29.2%).

The Census reported that 40,716 people (99.0% of the population) lived in households, 316 (0.8%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 82 (0.2%) were institutionalized.

There were 14,701 households, out of which 4,831 (32.9%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 7,364 (50.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,830 (12.4%) had a female householder with no husband present, 850 (5.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 764 (5.2%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 123 (0.8%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 3,660 households (24.9%) were made up of individuals and 1,119 (7.6%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77. There were 10,044 families (68.3% of all households); the average family size was 3.31.

The population was spread out with 8,632 people (21.0%) under the age of 18, 3,577 people (8.7%) aged 18 to 24, 12,038 people (29.3%) aged 25 to 44, 11,653 people (28.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 5,214 people (12.7%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.8 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.

There were 15,356 housing units at an average density of 2,803.1 per square mile (1,082.3/km²), of which 8,938 (60.8%) were owner-occupied, and 5,763 (39.2%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.1%; the rental vacancy rate was 3.9%. 24,712 people (60.1% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 16,004 people (38.9%) lived in rental housing units.

Demographic profile[13] 2010
Total Population 41,114 - 100.0%
One Race 38,413 - 93.4%
Not Hispanic or Latino 29,098 - 70.8%
White alone 14,781 - 36.0%
Black or African American alone 841 - 2.0%
American Indian and Alaska Native alone 89 - 0.2%
Asian alone 10,228 - 24.9%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone 1,342 - 3.3%
Some other race alone 260 - 0.6%
Two or more races alone 1,557 - 3.8%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 12,016 - 29.2%

2000

As of the census[14] of 2008, there were 42,401 people, 15,486 households, and 10,561 families residing in the city. The population density was 8,353.6 people per square mile (3,840.3/km²). There were 16,403 housing units at an average density of 3,742.6 per square mile (2,059.3/km²).

There were 15,486 households out of which 35.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.8% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.72 and the average family size was 4.29.

In the city, the age distribution of the population shows 25.0% under the age of 18, 11.2% from 18 to 24, 35.5% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.

The median household income for the city was $60,081, and the median income for a family was $69,251 (these figures had risen to $71,869 and $80,401 respectively as of a 2008 estimate[15]). Males had a median income of $47,843 versus $39,851 for females. The per capita income for the city was $25,360. About 5.1% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.8% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

The current Mayor of San Bruno is Rico E. Medina who began his term as Mayor on December 12, 2017. He has previously been a Council Member.[16] The previous mayor of San Bruno was Jim Ruane,[4] first elected in 2009 and served until December 2017. The mayor before Jim Ruane was Larry Franzella, first elected November 1999, and who was reelected through November 2009.[17] Bob Marshall, "Mr. San Bruno", served as mayor from 1980 to 1992.[18] San Bruno is one of the only cities in San Mateo County with an independently elected mayor.[19]

In the California State Legislature, San Bruno is in the 13th Senate District, represented by Democrat Jerry Hill, and in the 22nd Assembly District, represented by Democrat Kevin Mullin.[20]

In the United States House of Representatives, San Bruno is in California's 14th congressional district, represented by Democrat Jackie Speier.[21]

As of December 2014, the three largest political affiliations of the nearly twenty thousand registered voters in the City of San Bruno were the Democratic Party (10,882), Decline to State (5,092), and Republican (3,056).[22]

Parks

San Bruno City Park, bordered by Crystal Springs Avenue and El Crystal School, is the major municipal park. It offers shaded walkways and hiking trails, picnic tables, a playground, a small ballpark, a municipal swimming pool, and a recreation center that includes an indoor basketball court once used for training by the San Francisco Warriors basketball team. There are smaller municipal parks in other parts of the city.

Junipero Serra County Park, also accessible from Crystal Springs Avenue, is a 100-acre (.405 square kilometer) park owned by San Mateo County and includes numerous hiking trails, as well as picnic shelters, barbecue pits, and picnic tables. The wilderness area was named for Junípero Serra, a Franciscan friar who founded many of the Spanish missions in California during the eighteenth century; Serra regularly passed through what is now San Bruno whenever he visited the mission at San Francisco. The park is administered by the San Mateo County Parks and Recreation Department, which charges a six dollar entry fee for vehicles.

Education

The city is served by the San Bruno Park School District which operates seven elementary schools, and one intermediate school; in 1970, the school district had an enrollment of 4,829, and in 2013 is closer to 2,700.[23] San Mateo Union High School District also serves the city, and most students who attend secondary public education attend Capuchino High School, the only High School in the community after Crestmoor High School was closed in 1980.[23] The city's main library is part of the Peninsula Library System.

History

Early years

San Bruno was the location of the Ohlone village Urebure. It was explored in November 1769 by a Spanish expedition led by Gaspar de Portolà. Later, more extensive explorations by Bruno de Heceta resulted in the naming of San Bruno Creek after St. Bruno of Cologne, the founder of a medieval monastic order. This creek apparently later gave its name to the community.

With the establishment of the San Francisco de Asís (St. Francis of Assisi) mission, much of the area became pasture for the mission livestock. Following the decline of the missions, the area became part of Rancho Buri Buri granted to José de la Cruz Sánchez, the eleventh Alcalde (mayor) of San Francisco. After Jose Antonio Sanchez died, his heirs divided the Rancho and sold it off.[24] Dairy farms later became common in much of the area.

The city began as Clarks's Station,[25] a stop on the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach route, utilizing an inn built in 1849, which was initially called Thorp's Place and later Uncle Tom's Cabin or 14 Mile House.[26] The inn was demolished in 1949 and replaced with a Lucky's supermarket (now a Walgreens drugstore, on the corner of El Camino Real and Crystal Springs Avenue). Gus Jenevein (for whom Jenevein Avenue was named) built another landmark called San Bruno House, which burned several times and was not rebuilt after the third fire. A few homes and farms were developed in the area. The railroad between San Francisco and San Jose built a train station at San Bruno in the 1860s. The railroad eventually became part of the Southern Pacific system, which ran both passenger and freight trains on the line. Today it is known as Caltrain.

A U.S. Post Office was first established at San Bruno in 1875. Postal services were discontinued for several months in both 1890 and 1891, then from 1893 to 1898. There has been a post office in San Bruno continuously since 1898. The present post office is located near the Tanforan shopping center.[27][28]

20th century

Real growth and development began after the 1906 earthquake and fire. The city's first public school was completed in late 1906. With the construction of Edgemont Elementary School in 1910, all classes were moved there and the original school building became a public facility named Green Hall. Another school, North Brae Elementary School, opened in 1912; among its earliest students was future actor Eddie "Rochester" Anderson. Paving of California's first state highway, El Camino Real, began in 1912 in front of San Bruno's Uncle Tom's Cabin; the highway is now designated as State Route 82. The adjoining San Francisco International Airport opened in early 1927 and included a Weather Bureau station, now operated by the National Weather Service. Charles Lindbergh was an early visitor to the airport, during his national tour following his successful transatlantic flight; unfortunately, his airplane (Spirit of St. Louis) became stuck in the mud.

On January 18, 1911, aviator Eugene Ely made naval aviation history when he took off from Tanforan and made a successful landing on the armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania anchored in San Francisco Bay.[29] This marked the first successful shipboard aircraft landing.[30]

Following a campaign by the local newspaper, the San Bruno Herald, the community was incorporated in 1914, mainly so the streets could be paved. Green Hall became the first city hall. San Bruno grew rapidly, passing 1,500 residents by 1920 and 3,610 residents in 1930. Additional schools, including New Edgemont (later renamed Decima Allen) and Crystal Springs, were built during the 1940s.

In 1930, the El Camino Theater opened at the corner of El Camino Real and San Mateo Avenue. The popular theater, wired for sound, replaced the earlier Melody Theater, which had presented silent films. The El Camino showed double features, cartoons, short comedies, adventure serials, and newsreels during its history, including Saturday matinees and summer Wednesday matinees for children. Normally, films changed every week, but in 1958 Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments ran for two weeks to packed audiences. The theater closed in the early 1970s when a four-screen movie theater opened in the Tanforan shopping center. The El Camino Theater building was remodeled and is currently vacant.[31] A larger, multi-screen complex was later built north of Tanforan, but it has been replaced by an even larger complex, Century at Tanforan, in the remodeled shopping center.[32]

San Bruno, California. Barrack home in one of the long lines of converted horse stalls. Each famil . . . - NARA - 537897
Barrack home in one of the long lines of converted horse stalls at Tanforan Assembly Center, June 16, 1942

In 1939, the War Department created the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno as space was starting to run out for veterans to be buried at the Presidio of San Francisco. In 1942, after the start of World War II, the local race track became the Tanforan Assembly Center, a temporary detention site for Japanese Americans evicted from the West Coast under Executive Order 9066.[33]

Following World War II, there was continued growth and new subdivisions in Mills Park, Rollingwood, and Crestmoor. In 1947, the Bayshore Freeway (U.S. Route 101) was opened from South San Francisco to Redwood City and included an interchange at San Bruno.

Prior to 1950, San Bruno's high school students attended San Mateo High School (opened in 1902) and then Burlingame High School (opened in 1923), traveling to and from school on the street cars that ran next to the Southern Pacific railroad. Finally, on September 11, 1950, Capuchino High School opened in San Bruno. After years of using Green Hall as a multi-purpose building, the city dedicated a library and city hall in 1954. That same year saw the dedication of the current central terminal at the airport, part of a major expansion program. A central fire station was later built next to the city hall; an additional station was built in Crestmoor.

Actress and businesswoman Suzanne Somers was born in San Bruno in 1946. She attended local schools and graduated from Capuchino High School in June 1964.

In 1953, San Bruno annexed the adjoining unincorporated community of Lomita Park, bounded by San Felipe Avenue, El Camino Real, San Juan Avenue, and the railroad tracks.[34] Until the annexation, Lomita Park had its own Southern Pacific train station and some community services.

Parkside Intermediate School was opened in 1954, followed by additional elementary schools: Rollingwood, Crestmoor, John Muir, and Carl Sandburg. A second intermediate school, Engvall, was built in Crestmoor Canyon, only to be closed, along with North Brae and Sandburg, when enrollment fell. These were all part of the San Bruno Park School District. Students in northwestern San Bruno were included in the Laguna Salada district. The private school, Highlands Christian School, is also located in San Bruno. Founded in 1966, Highlands Christian School is an interdenominational school, and offers preschool through college preparatory school instruction.

San Bruno considered new annexations in the mid-1950s that would have extended the city limits to the Pacific Ocean. The unincorporated communities west of San Bruno were against annexation, and collectively incorporated as the city of Pacifica in 1957.

On March 22, 1957, a magnitude 5.7 earthquake was centered in the area of the city.[35] It inflicted minor damage throughout the city, especially in some of the schools, breaking windows and cracking plaster. A large chunk of plasterboard fell on the table where school district administrators were meeting, but no one was injured. Items were knocked off the shelves at local stores, causing some temporary closures. Capuchino High School closed for the day following the quake, while other schools evacuated students to open areas.

Eitel-McCullough operated a large manufacturing plant in San Bruno for many years. William Eitel and Jack McCullogh formed the company in 1934. It specialized in the manufacture of power grid tubes.[36] Known as Eimac, the company also made vacuum tubes used in communication equipment, as well as other products for military and commercial applications.[37] Due to its work on broadcast transmission parts, Eimac operated an FM radio station, KSBR, which transmitted on 100.5 megahertz.[38] The station began operations in 1947 and, that same year, was one of only two in the nation to test Rangertone tape recorders. (The other station was WASH-FM in Washington, D.C.)[39] The recorders were based on the German Magnetophon.[40] In need of more space, the company moved to San Carlos in 1959.[41] Eimac's San Carlos plant was dedicated on April 16, 1959.[41] In 1965, Eimac merged with Varian Associates and became known as the Eimac Division. In 1995, Leonard Green & Partners purchased the entire Electron Devices Business from Varian and formed Communications & Power Industries.[42]

SkylinePark
Skyline Park was the final subdivision developed in the Crestmoor district of San Bruno, in 1966–67. Grading for the Junipero Serra Freeway (I-280) leveled the hill seen on the right side of this photo. (San Bruno Herald photo by Robert E. Nylund)

Crestmoor High School opened in September 1962, but was closed in June 1980 due to a decline in school enrollment. The city has a two-year community college, Skyline College.

A major landmark in San Bruno for many years was Tanforan Racetrack, which opened in 1899. Such famous racehorses as Seabiscuit and Citation raced there. Famed Hollywood director Frank Capra filmed scenes for two of his films, Broadway Bill and Riding High, at the racetrack. For six months in 1942, it served as one of the main Bay Area centers for those forced into Japanese American internment, processing about 8000 Japanese before they were sent out to larger facilities in the desert of Utah and Manzanar in Owens Valley.[43] The track closed in 1964 and was about to be demolished, when it was destroyed in a major fire on July 31, 1964.[44] The Shops at Tanforan mall was later built on the site; surrounding city streets were named for some of the racehorses who appeared at Tanforan.

The city was the site of the crash of Flying Tiger Line Flight 282 on December 23, 1964.

During the late 1960s, the I-280 (Junipero Serra Freeway), followed by I-380, was built through San Bruno. The San Bruno Planning Commission (then chaired by Peter Weinberger, brother of Caspar Weinberger) reviewed and approved plans for two major shopping centers, Bayhill (located on the old U.S. Navy property between San Bruno Avenue and Sneath Lane) and Tanforan. With final approval by the San Bruno City Council, construction proceeded on these major retail developments. Prior to these developments, most of the city's retail businesses were located on San Mateo Avenue and El Camino Real.

San Bruno is one of two cities in the Bay Area that manages its own cable TV and internet system.

The October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake (6.9 magnitude) caused some damage in the city. The U.S. Postal Service's Western Regional headquarters, then the tallest building in San Bruno, had to be demolished due to severe structural damage. The site was rebuilt as part of an expansion of The Gap clothing company world headquarters campus.[45] The building now houses the headquarters for Wal-Mart's online retail services,[46] Walmart.com, and is now the tallest building in the city.

21st century

The San Bruno BART station opened in 2003, when the transit system was extended to Millbrae and the San Francisco International Airport.

September 2010 explosion and fire

Devastation in San Bruno
Destruction after fire and explosion in San Bruno
Millbrae, San Bruno, and San Andreas Lake
Aerial view of San Andreas Lake with portions of Millbrae and San Bruno

On September 9, 2010, at about 6:15 p.m. PDT, a gas line ruptured leading to a fire that severely damaged a residential neighborhood. Eight people were killed, nearly 60 others were injured, 38 homes were destroyed and 123 additional homes were damaged.[47][48] The resulting fire "hot spots" were easily detected using meteorological satellite images.[49]

The explosion, which took place two miles (3 km) west of San Francisco International Airport (37°37′23″N 122°26′31″W / 37.623°N 122.442°W), was initially thought to have been a plane crash, but the FAA and airport officials confirmed no downed aircraft was reported.[50][51]

During the days prior to the explosion, some residents reported a strong smell of natural gas in the area.[52][53]

On September 10, a team from the National Transportation Safety Board began an investigation into the cause of the explosion.[54]

On September 13, PG&E agreed to set aside a $100 million fund to the victims of the explosion. This does not preclude residents from taking any further action against PG&E. Parts of the exploded material were taken to Washington, D.C., a couple of days after the explosion for examination.[55]

YouTube headquarters

In 2007 YouTube had moved its headquarters from San Mateo, California to San Bruno, on Cherry Avenue next to Interstate 380.[56] The main building was initially built for Gap Inc. in 1997.[57] It had been designed in 1994, has a green roof, and was built with energy efficient ventilation systems.[58] Across more than six properties, YouTube has over 1,700 employees working in the city, and is San Bruno's largest employer.[59] On April 3, 2018, a shooting took place at the YouTube headquarters as a woman opened fire and wounded four others.[60]

Former Naval Facility San Bruno

USMC - 23rd Marine Regiment
23rd Marines' Insignia

During World War II the United States Navy established a base on what was a dairy opened by Richard Sneath.[61] There it operated a Classification Center and a Naval Advance Base Personnel Depot.[62] After the war it continued operation,[63] and became host to the consolidated Western Division of Naval Facilities, supporting the multiple navy bases that were operating in the greater San Francisco Bay Area.[64] Due to the 1993 BRAC and its closure of neighboring bases although recommended for realignment, the Navy decided to close the facility, carrying through with its decision in October 1994.[65]

The federal government retained part of the former Naval Facility. The Pacific Region (San Francisco) facility of the National Archives and Records Administration was established.[66] One of the buildings became a Navy and Marine Corps Reserve Center, which hosts the Headquarters Company of the 23rd Marine Regiment, amongst other units.[67][68] The rest of the facility was sold to a private developer who has since built multi-story apartment buildings on the former base.[69] The 20-acre (81,000 m2) area of the former U.S. Navy complex is bounded by San Bruno Avenue, El Camino Real, Sneath Lane, and I-280.

Economy

Top employers

According to San Bruno's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[70] and San Mateo Daily Journal [71] the top employers in the city were:

# Employer # of Employees
1 YouTube 1974
2 Walmart Global eCommerce 1400
3 Skyline College 611
4 Artichoke Joes 411
5 Lash Group 323
6 Sears 293
7 Target 292
8 IronPort 262
9 InQuira 160
10 Lowe's 150
11 Melody Toyota 68
12 VantagePoint Venture Partners 57
13 DaVita Rx 52

In popular culture

In video games

Notable people

Sister cities

See also

References

  1. ^ Whiting, Sam (8 February 2004). "The Heart of San Bruno / Hidden within an unusually shaped housing tract is Cupid Row". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
    Livengood, Carolyn (21 January 2011). "Carolyn Livengood: San Bruno honors Glenview residents". Mercury News. San Jose, California. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
    Clifford, Jim (8 February 2016). "San Bruno has a heart every day". San Mateo Daily Journal. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  2. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  3. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date". California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Archived from the original (Word) on November 3, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.
  4. ^ a b "City Council". City of San Bruno. Retrieved 16 February 2018.
  5. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jun 28, 2017.
  6. ^ "San Bruno". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved January 5, 2015.
  7. ^ "San Bruno (city) QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 8, 2015.
  8. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
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External links

23d Marine Regiment (United States)

The 23d Marine Regiment (23d Marines) is a reserve infantry regiment of the United States Marine Corps. It is headquartered in San Bruno, California and falls under the command of the 4th Marine Division and the Marine Forces Reserve.

The regiment comprises twenty units which are geographically dispersed throughout eight states from California to Alabama. The regiment consists of Marine reservists, active duty Marines and active duty Navy personnel. The regimental headquarters is located in San Bruno, California.

Bass Player (magazine)

Bass Player is a magazine for bassists. Each issue offers a variety of artist interviews, lessons, equipment reviews, and a complete transcribed bass line from a popular song. The magazine was founded in 1988 as a spinoff of Guitar Player magazine, with Jim Roberts as its first editor. It began as a regular edition magazine in 1990. The headquarters of the magazine is in San Bruno, California.Currently published by Future US, Bass Player holds an annual event for bassists, Bass Player LIVE!. From 2004 until 2007 Bass Player LIVE! was held in New York City; beginning in 2008 it was held in Hollywood, California.

California's 13th State Senate district

California's 13th State Senate district is one of 40 California State Senate districts. It is currently represented by Democrat Jerry Hill of San Mateo.

California's 22nd State Assembly district

California's 22nd State Assembly district is one of 80 California State Assembly districts. It is currently represented by Democrat Kevin Mullin of South San Francisco.

Capuchino High School

Capuchino High School is a public high school in San Bruno, California, United States. The school is surrounded by the city of Millbrae on all but one corner. It is one of seven high schools in the San Mateo Union High School District, a division of the San Mateo County Office of Education.

Capuchino's rival is Mills High School in Millbrae.

Crestmoor High School

Crestmoor High School opened in San Bruno, California in September 1962 to relieve congestion at Capuchino High School and Mills High School. It was the seventh high school to be built by the San Mateo Union High School District, based in San Mateo, California. Construction began in 1960 on a graded plateau in the Crestmoor district of San Bruno and took about two years to complete. The buildings, which are similar in design to those of Aragon High School, Hillsdale High School, and Mills High School, were constructed mostly of steel and glass, featuring expansion systems to provide earthquake resistance. The school, and its similarly designed schools, have been designed in an architectural style described as "postwar techno-optimism". The school was closed in 1980.Field Area:The schools Baseball and Football/Track fields are still open to the public, and are currently maintained by the San Bruno City. The track is one of the last dirt tracks you can run on. The fields are enjoyed by youth soccer teams.

The view from the school site takes in the East Bay and South San Francisco to San Mateo.

Golden Gate National Cemetery

Golden Gate National Cemetery is a United States national cemetery in California, located in the city of San Bruno, 12 miles (20 km) south of San Francisco. Because of the name and location, it is frequently confused with San Francisco National Cemetery, which dates to the 19th century and is in the Presidio of San Francisco, in view of the Golden Gate. Around 1937, San Francisco residents voted to bar the opening of new cemeteries within the city proper and, as a result, the site for the new national cemetery was selected south of the city limits in adjacent San Mateo County.

Junior Burgos

Efraín Antonio Burgos Jr. (born August 14, 1988), better known as Junior Burgos, is a Salvadoran professional footballer.

Keyboard (magazine)

Keyboard is a magazine that originally covered electronic keyboard instruments and keyboardists, though with the advent of computer-based recording and audio technology, they have added digital music technology to their regular coverage, including those not strictly pertaining to the keyboard-related instruments. The magazine has its headquarters in San Bruno, California.

Neal Dahlen

Neal Dahlen is a retired American football administrator, who worked for San Francisco 49ers (1979–1996), and the Denver Broncos (1996–2003), and was General Manager of the Broncos from 1999 to January 2002.Dahlen has the distinction of being tied (with Bill Belichick) for the most Super Bowl rings in history, at seven. He earned five with the 49ers, and two during his time at the Broncos.Dahlen attended Capuchino High School in San Bruno, California. He then played quarterback at San Jose State University, where he graduated from in 1963 (and earned a master's in 1964). He then coached baseball and football at Hillsdale High School in San Mateo, as well as at the College of San Mateo.

Dahlen starting working part-time for the 49ers in 1979, and earned increasing administrative responsibilities. He moved to Denver in 1996 to become director of player personnel, and later was named general manager in 1999. Ted Sundquist replaced him in early 2002, and Dahlen became the team's director of football administration until he retired the following year.

San Bruno Creek

San Bruno Creek (Spanish for: "St. Brun") is an intermittent stream that rises on the eastern slopes of the Northern Santa Cruz Mountains in San Mateo County, California, USA. The headwaters descend a relatively steep canyon east of Skyline Boulevard in a tortuous course. Comparison of topographic maps from 1896 and 1939 illustrates the extreme modification in the lower reaches due to urban development from the rapidly expanding population. The San Bruno Creek watershed was originally settled by a tribe of the Ohlone, and later this locale was part of the Spanish missions' landholdings.

A hiking trail winds along San Bruno Creek representing an important link in the San Francisco Bay Trail; in fact, this link is needed to make up for lack of access along a large bay front area occupied exclusively by San Francisco International Airport; thus, the Bay Trail must detour a full two miles inland from the bay to meet the San Bruno Creek Trail.

San Bruno Park School District

San Bruno Park Elementary School District was created in 1906 in San Bruno, California to meet the needs of a growing population following the San Francisco earthquake and fire.

San Bruno pipeline explosion

The San Bruno pipeline explosion occurred at 6:11 pm PDT on September 9, 2010, in San Bruno, California, a suburb of San Francisco, when a 30-inch (76 cm) diameter steel natural gas pipeline owned by Pacific Gas & Electric exploded into flames in the Crestmoor residential neighborhood 2 mi (3.2 km) west of San Francisco International Airport near Skyline Boulevard and San Bruno Avenue.

The loud roar and shaking led some residents of the area, first responders, and news media to initially believe that it was an earthquake or that a large jetliner had crashed. It took crews nearly an hour to determine it was a gas pipeline explosion.

As of September 29, 2010, the death toll was eight people. The United States Geological Survey registered the explosion and resulting shock wave as a magnitude 1.1 earthquake. Eyewitnesses reported the initial blast "had a wall of fire more than 1,000 feet high".

San Bruno station (BART)

San Bruno is a Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station located adjacent to the Tanforan shopping center in San Bruno, California, United States in northern San Mateo County. It consists of two main tracks and a shared underground island platform.

During daytime hours on weekdays, the station serves as a cross-platform transfer station for passengers traveling between Millbrae station to the south and San Francisco International Airport station to the east. Service at the station began on June 22, 2003 as part of the BART San Mateo County Extension project that extended BART service southward from Colma to Millbrae and San Francisco International Airport.

San Bruno station (Caltrain)

San Bruno is a Caltrain station located in San Bruno, California. The station is located just northeast of downtown San Bruno, above the intersection of San Mateo and San Bruno Avenues, adjacent to Artichoke Joe's Casino.

San Francisco Bay Discovery Site

The San Francisco Bay Discovery Site is a marker commemorating the first recorded European sighting of San Francisco Bay. In 1769, the Portola expedition traveled north by land from San Diego, seeking to establish a base at the Port of Monterey described by Sebastian Vizcaino in 1602. When they reached Monterey, however, they were not sure it was the right place and decided to continue north. The party reached San Pedro Creek on October 31 and camped there for four nights, while scouts led by José Francisco Ortega climbed Sweeney Ridge, where they could see over the ridge toward the east, and so became the first Europeans to see San Francisco Bay on November 1.

The scouts returned on November 3, and led the entire party up to the ridge on November 4. Franciscan missionary Juan Crespi noted in his diary, "from the summit of a peak we beheld the great estuary or arm of the sea..." After seeing the immense bay to the east, and having learned from the scouts that further progress to the north would be blocked by the Golden Gate, the party turned southeast and descended toward the bay.

Sweeney Ridge is located in northern San Mateo County and is now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The site is both a California Historical Landmark and a National Historic Landmark. The spot chosen for the marker is somewhat arbitrary, as the precise location where Portola's party reached the summit of the ridge is not known. The landmarked area encompasses two of the highest knolls on the ridge.

Skyline College

Skyline College is one of three comprehensive community colleges within the San Mateo County Community College District. Opened in 1969, the College is located just south of San Francisco in San Bruno, California on a site overlooking the Pacific Ocean.Skyline College claims an annual population of over 17,000 students.Students can choose from more than 100 degree and certificate programs.

The Shops at Tanforan

The Shops at Tanforan is a redeveloped, regional shopping mall in San Bruno, California. It is located in the Peninsula of the San Francisco Bay Area, 10 miles south of San Francisco. It is served by the adjacent San Bruno Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station, as well as several local SamTrans bus lines and the Brisbane Shuttle. The complex is located minutes away from San Francisco International Airport.

The mall underwent a 3-year reconstruction, and reopened in 2005. It continues to be anchored by two of its original major retailers Sears, and JCPenney, as well as a Century Theatres that opened in 2008. However, one of the anchoring retailers: Target actually purchased the space from The Emporium in 1996.

YouTube headquarters shooting

On April 3, 2018, at 12:46 p.m. PDT, a shooting occurred at the headquarters of the video-sharing website YouTube in San Bruno, California. The suspect was later identified as 39-year-old Nasim Najafi Aghdam, who entered through an exterior parking garage, approached an outdoor patio, and opened fire with a Smith & Wesson 9 mm caliber semi-automatic pistol. Aghdam wounded three people, one of them critically, before killing herself.San Bruno police said that "the investigation is now looking into a website that appears to show the same woman complaining about YouTube stifling traffic and suppressing videos."The shooting was a rare example of an active shooter incident committed solely by a woman; a 2014 FBI study reported that women perpetrated just six out of 160 active shooter incidents in the United States between 2000 and 2013.

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