Salvo, North Carolina

Salvo is a census-designated place located in Dare County, North Carolina, United States, on Hatteras Island, part of North Carolina's Outer Banks. As of the 2010 census, Salvo had a population of 229.[2] Originally (with Rodanthe and Waves) part of the settlement of Chicamacomico, Salvo was originally known as "Clarks" or "Clarksville."

The name "Salvo" allegedly stems from the American Civil War, during which a passing Union vessel spotted the settlement, which was not marked on their maps. The commanding officer ordered an attack, and a sailor marked the site on his map with the word "Salvo." The name was formally given to the town when it received a post office in 1901. The Salvo post office, ZIP code 27972, one of the smallest postal facilities in the United States, was damaged by an arsonist in 1992. A new post office was constructed later in the decade for all of Chicamacomico. Hurricane Irene in August 2011 damaged much of the Outer Banks area including Salvo.

The residents of Salvo are governed by the Dare County Board of Commissioners. Salvo is part of District 4, along with Avon, Buxton, Frisco, Hatteras, Rodanthe and Waves.

On June 24, 2014, a Virginia vacationer became buried alive in beach sand when trying to dig a tunnel, and then died.[3]

Salvo Post Office was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.[4]

Salvo, North Carolina
Location in Dare County and the state of North Carolina.
Location in Dare County and the state of North Carolina.
Coordinates: 35°32′56″N 75°28′8″W / 35.54889°N 75.46889°WCoordinates: 35°32′56″N 75°28′8″W / 35.54889°N 75.46889°W
CountryUnited States
StateNorth Carolina
CountyDare
Area
 • Total0.98 sq mi (2.53 km2)
 • Land0.97 sq mi (2.51 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation
3 ft (0.9 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total229
 • Density236/sq mi (91.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EST)
ZIP code
27972
FIPS code37-58940
GNIS feature ID2628655[1]

References

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Salvo, North Carolina
  2. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Salvo CDP, North Carolina". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved November 24, 2015.
  3. ^ http://www.witn.com/home/headlines/Man-Dies-On-OBX-Beach-After-Being-Buried-Alive-264434311.html Man bured alive trying to dig a sand tunnel
  4. ^ National Park Service (July 9, 2010). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.

External links

Preceded by
Waves
Beaches of The Outer Banks Succeeded by
Avon
Hurricane Hanna

Hurricane Hanna was a moderate but deadly tropical cyclone that caused extensive damage across the Western Atlantic, particularly in the Turks and Caicos Islands and the East Coast of the United States. The eighth named storm and fourth hurricane of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season. It formed east-northeast of the northern Leeward Islands on August 28. Initially, the storm struggled to intensify due to moderate wind shear as it moved westwards towards the Bahamas. By August 31, Hanna had drifted southwards and began intensifying while over the Bahamas; it attained its peak intensity as a Category 1 hurricane while over the Turks and Caicos Islands. Due to the outflow of the nearby Hurricane Gustav, Hanna weakened back into a tropical storm the next day as it began to drift northwestwards towards the Southeastern United States. The storm struck Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, before moving up the Eastern Seaboard to become an extratropical cyclone as it moved by New England into Atlantic Canada early on September 7. The system raced across the North Atlantic, sweeping west of Great Britain on September 10 before turning north and becoming absorbed by a stronger extratropical cyclone between Iceland and Greenland late on September 12.

At least 537 deaths were reported (the final death toll will likely never be known), mostly due to flooding in the northern part of Haiti. Hanna also caused $160 million in damages to the U.S, but the exact damage in Haiti is unknown. Despite the high number of deaths caused by the hurricane, the name Hanna was not retired.

List of United States Post Offices

This is a List of United States Post Offices that are individually notable and that have operated under the authority of the United States Post Office Department (1792–1971) or of the United States Postal Service (since 1971). Notable U.S. Post Offices include individual buildings, whether still in service or not, which have architectural or community-related significance. Many of these are listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and/or state and local historic registers.

List of unincorporated communities in North Carolina

The following is a partial list of named, but unincorporated communities in the state of North Carolina. To be listed, the unincorporated community should either be a census-designated place (CDP) or a place with at least a few commercial businesses. A crossroads is not necessarily considered an unincorporated "community". Former incorporated towns usually qualify.

Pamlico Sound

Pamlico Sound ( PAM-lik-oh) in North Carolina in the US is the largest lagoon along the North American East Coast, extending 80 mi (130 km) long and 15 to 20 miles (24 to 48 km) wide. It is part of a large, interconnected network of lagoon estuaries that includes Albemarle Sound, Currituck Sound, Croatan Sound, Pamlico Sound, Bogue Sound, Core Sound, and Roanoke Sound. Together, these sounds, known as the Albemarle-Pamlico sound system, comprise the second largest estuary in the United States, covering over 3,000 sq. mi. of open water.(Chesapeake Bay is the largest.) The Pamlico Sound is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands that include Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Cape Lookout National Seashore, and Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. The Albemarle-Pamlico Sound is one of nineteen great waters recognized by the America's Great Waters Coalition.

Salvo Post Office

Salvo Post Office is a historic post office building located at Salvo, Dare County, North Carolina. It was built about 1910, and is a small frame building measuring 8 feet by 12 feet. The interior consists of the post office lobby and the postmaster's workroom. It reflects a unique tradition of a portable building being purchased by succeeding postmasters and moved to their respective properties. It is recognized by the U.S. Postal Service as the second-smallest post office building in the nation, after the Ochopee Post Office in Florida. It was restored after being damaged by fire in October 1992.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.

Municipalities and communities of Dare County, North Carolina, United States
Towns
CDPs
Unincorporated
communities
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