Salsa (dance)

Salsa is a popular form of social dance originating from Cuban folk dances. The movements of Salsa are a combination of the Afro-Cuban dances Son, cha-cha-cha, Mambo, Rumba, and the Danzón. The dance, along with salsa music,[1][2][3] saw major development in the mid-1970s in New York.[4] Different regions of Latin America and the United States have distinct salsa styles of their own, such as Cuban, Puerto Rican, Cali Colombia, L.A. and New York styles. Salsa dance socials are commonly held in night clubs, bars, ballrooms, restaurants, and outside, especially when part of an outdoor festival.

In many styles of salsa dancing, as a dancer shifts their weight by stepping, the upper body remains level and nearly unaffected by the weight changes. Weight shifts cause the hips to move. Arm and shoulder movements are also incorporated. Salsa generally uses music ranging from about 150 bpm (beats per minute) to around 250 bpm, although most dancing is done to music somewhere between 160–220 bpm. The basic Salsa dance rhythm consists of taking three steps for every four beats of music. The odd number of steps creates the syncopation inherent to Salsa dancing and ensures that it takes 8 beats of music to loop back to a new sequence of steps.

Salsa Training Camaguey Cuba
Salsa training in Camagüey, Cuba

Origin

Salsa evolved from forms such as Son, Son Montuno, cha cha cha, Mambo and Puerto Rican Bomba and Plena which were popular in the Caribbean, Latin America and the Latino communities in New York since the 1940s. Salsa, like most music genres and dance styles, has gone through a lot of variation through the years and incorporated elements of other Afro-Caribbean dances such as Pachanga. Different regions of Latin America and the United States have distinct salsa styles of their own, such as Cuban, Puerto Rican, Cali Colombia.

There is some controversy surrounding the origins of the word "salsa," which has been ascribed to the dance since the mid-1800s. Some claim that it was based on a cry shouted by musicians while they were playing their music. Others believe that the term was created by record labels to better market their music, who chose the word "salsa" because of its spicy and hot connotations. Still, others believe the term came about because salsa dancing and music is a mixture of different styles, just like salsa or "sauce" in Latin American countries is a mixture of different ingredients.

Description

In many styles of salsa dancing, as a dancer shifts their weight by stepping, the upper body remains level and nearly unaffected by the weight changes. Weight shifts cause the hips to move. Arm and shoulder movements are also incorporated. The Cuban Casino style of salsa dancing involves significant movement above the waist, with up-and-down shoulder movements and shifting of the ribcage.

The arms are used by the "lead" dancer to communicate or signal the "follower," either in "open" or "closed" position. The open position requires the two dancers to hold one or both hands, especially for moves that involve turns, putting arms behind the back, or moving around each other, to name a few examples. In the closed position, the leader puts the right hand on the follower's back, while the follower puts the left hand on the leader's shoulder.

In the original Latin American form, the forward/backward motion of salsa is done in diagonal or sideways with the 3-step weight change intact.

In some styles of salsa, such as the New York style, the dancers remain mostly in front of one another (switching places), while in Latin American styles, such as Cuban style, the dancers circle around each other, sometimes in 3 points. This circular style is inspired by Cuban Son, specifically to the beat of son montuno in the 1920s. However, as it is a popular music, it is open to improvisation and thus it is continuously evolving. Modern salsa styles are associated and named to the original geographic areas that developed them. There are often devotees of each of these styles outside their home territory. Characteristics that may identify a style include: timing, basic steps, foot patterns, body movement, turns and figures, attitude, dance influences and the way that partners hold each other. The point in a musical bar music where a slightly larger step is taken (the break step) and the direction the step moves can often be used to identify a style.

Incorporating other dance styling techniques into salsa dancing has become very common for both men and women: shimmies, leg work, arm work, body movement, spins, body isolations, shoulder shimmies, rolls, even hand styling, acrobatics and lifts.

Latin American styles originate from Puerto Rico, Cuba and surrounding Caribbean islands.

Venues

Salsa dance socials are commonly held in night clubs, bars, ballrooms, restaurants, and outside, especially if part of an outdoor festival. Salsa dancing is an international dance that can be found in most metropolitan cities in the world.[5] Festivals are held annually, often called a Salsa Congress, in various host cities aimed to attract variety of salsa dancers from other cities and countries. The events bring dancers together to share their passion for the dance, build community, and to share moves and tips with each other. These events usually include salsa dance performers, live salsa music, workshops, open dancing, and contests.

Rhythm

Dance-salsa-puerto-vallarta
Dancing Salsa in Mexico

Salsa generally uses music suitable for dancing ranges from about 150 bpm (beats per minute) to around 250 bpm, although most dancing is done to music somewhere between 160–220 bpm. Every salsa composition involves complex Afro-Cuban percussion based around the Clave Rhythm (which has four types), though there can be moments when the clave is hidden for a while, often when quoting Charanga, Changüí and Bomba. The key instrument that provides the core groove of a salsa song is the clave. It is often played with two wooden sticks (called clave) that are hit together. Every instrument in a salsa band is either playing with the clave (generally: congas, timbales, piano, tres guitar, bongos, claves (instrument), strings) or playing independent of the clave rhythm (generally: bass, maracas, güiro, cowbell). Melodic components of the music and dancers can choose to be in clave or out of clave at any point. However it is taboo to play or dance to the wrong type of clave rhythm (see salsa music). While dancers can mark the clave rhythm directly, it is more common to do so indirectly (with, for example, a shoulder movement). This allows the dancing itself to look very fluent as if the rest of the body is just moving untouched with the legs.

For salsa, there are four types of clave rhythms, the 3-2 and 2-3 Son claves being the most important, and the 3-2 and 2-3 Rumba claves. Most salsa music is played with one of the Son claves, though a Rumba clave is occasionally used, especially during Rumba sections of some songs. As an example of how a clave fits within the 8 beats of a salsa dance, the beats of the 2-3 Son clave are played on the counts of 2, 3, 5, the "and" of 6, and 8.

There are other aspects outside the Clave that help define salsa rhythm: the cowbell, the Montuno rhythm and the Tumbao rhythm.

The cowbell rhythm emphasizes the "on-beats" of salsa: 1, 3, 5 and 7 while the conga rhythm emphasizes the "off-beats" of the music: 2, 4, 6, and 8. Some dancers like to use the strong sound of the cowbell to stay on the Salsa rhythm. Alternatively, others use the conga rhythm to create a jazzier feel to their dance since strong "off-beats" are a jazz element.

Tumbao is the name of the rhythm that is played with the conga drums. It sounds like: "cu, cum.. pa... cu, cum... pa". Its most basic pattern is played on the beats 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8. Tumbao rhythm is helpful for learning to dance contra-tiempo ("On2"). The beats 2 and 6 are emphasized when dancing On2, and the Tumbao rhythm heavily emphasizes those beats as well.

The Montuno rhythm is a rhythm that is often played with a piano. The Montuno rhythm loops over the 8 counts and is useful for finding the direction of the music. By listening to the same rhythm, that loops back to the beginning after eight counts, one can recognize which count is the first beat of the music.

The basic Salsa dance rhythm consists of taking three steps for every four beats of music. The odd number of steps creates the inherent syncopation to the Salsa dancing and ensures that it takes 8 beats of music to loop back to a new sequence of steps. Different styles employ this syncopation differently. For "On1" dancers this rhythm is described as "quick, quick, quick, pause, quick, quick, quick, pause." For "On2" dancers this rhythm is "quick, quick, slow, quick, quick, slow." In all cases, only three steps are taken in each 4-beat measure (or 6 total over 8 beats).

Styles

India International Salsa Congress Bangalore, 2004
International Salsa Congress, 2004 at Bangalore
Video demonstrating salsa dancing fundamentals

Salsa's roots are based on different genres such as Puerto Rican rhythms, Cuban Son, specifically to the beat of Son Montuno in the 1920s. However, as it is a popular music, it is open to improvisation and thus it is continuously evolving. New modern salsa styles are associated and named to the original geographic areas that developed them. There are often devotees of each of these styles outside their home territory. Characteristics that may identify a style include: timing, basic steps, foot patterns, body rolls and movements, turns and figures, attitude, dance influences and the way that partners hold each other. The point in a musical bar music where a slightly larger step is taken (the break step) and the direction the step moves can often be used to identify a style.

Afro-Latino style

The afro-latino style is a very popular kind of salsa in the Caribbean, Puerto Rico, Haiti and Cuba. It pretty much involves the same dancing as most versions of the salsa but has a little bit of twist added to it. The thing that separates it and gives it its own identity is that some of the songs tie in an African language and certain African instruments that gives the songs different rhythms.

Incorporating other dance styling techniques into salsa dancing has become very common, for both men and women: shimmies, leg work, arm work, body movement, spins, body isolations, shoulder shimmies, rolls, even hand styling, acrobatics and lifts.

Latin American styles originate from Puerto Rico, Cuba and surrounding Caribbean islands including the Dominican Republic, and then expanding to Venezuela, Colombia, and the rest of Latin America; Also, there exists the "Miami" style, which is a fusion of some Cuban style elements with elements of various North American dances from the USA.

Colombian / Cali style

Cali-Style Salsa, also known as Colombian Salsa and Salsa Caleña, is based on geographical location of the Colombian City of Cali. Cali is also known as the "Capital de la Salsa" (Salsa's Capital); due to salsa music being the main genre in parties, nightclubs and festivals in the 21st century.

The elements of Cali-Style Salsa were strongly influenced by dances to Caribbean rhythms which preceded salsa, such as Pachanga and Boogaloo. Cali has the most salsa schools and salsa teams in the world. Many of the competitions are held in Colombia.[6]

The central feature is the footwork which has quick rapid steps and skipping motions. Colombian style does not execute Cross-body Leads or the "Dile Que No" as seen in other styles, but rather step in place and displace in closed position. Their footwork is intricate and precise, helping several Colombian Style dancers win major world championships. Cali hosts many annual salsa events such as the World Salsa Cali Festival and the Encuentro de Melomanos y Coleccionistas.

Cuban style / Casino

In Cuba, a popular dance known as Casino was marketed as Cuban-style salsa or Salsa Cubana abroad to distinguish it from other salsa styles when the name was popularized in the 1970s. Casino is popular in many places around the world, including in Europe, Latin America, North America, and even in some countries in the Middle East such as Israel. Dancing Casino is an expression of popular social culture; Cubans consider casino as part of social and cultural activities centering on their popular music. The name Casino is derived from the Spanish term for the dance halls, "Casinos Deportivos" where a lot of social dancing was done among the better-off, white Cubans during the mid-20th century and onward.

Historically, Casino traces its origin as a partner dance from Cuban Son, Cha Cha Cha, Danzón and Guaracha. Traditionally, Casino is danced "a contratiempo". This means that, distinct from subsequent forms of salsa, no step is taken on the first and fifth beats in each clave pattern and the fourth and eighth beat are emphasised. In this way, rather than following a beat, the dancers themselves contribute in their movement, to the polyrythmic pattern of the music. At the same time, it is often danced "a tiempo", although both "on3" (originally) and "on1" (nowadays).

What gives the dance its life, however, is not its mechanical technique, but understanding and spontaneous use of the rich Afro-Cuban dance vocabulary within a "Casino" dance. In the same way that a "sonero" (lead singer in Son and salsa bands) will "quote" other, older songs in their own, a "casino" dancer will frequently improvise references to other dances, integrating movements, gestures and extended passages from the folkloric and popular heritage. This is particularly true of African descended Cubans. Such improvisations might include extracts of rumba, dances for African deities, the older popular dances such as Cha Cha Chá and Danzon as well as anything the dancer may feel.

Miami-style Casino

Developed by Cuban immigrants to Florida and centered on Miami, this dance style is a fusion of some elements from Casino with lots of elements from American culture and dances. The major difference of Miami-style from other North American styles is the "Atras" or "Diagonal", back breaking steps performed backwards diagonally instead of moving forwards and backwards as seen in the New York style. Dancers do not shift their body weight greatly as seen in other styles. Instead, dancers keep their upper body still, poised and relaxed while the feet execute endless intricacies. The dancer breaks mostly On1.

A major difference of Cali Style and Miami-style is that the latter is exclusively danced on the downbeat (On1) and has elements of shines and show-style added to it, following repertoires of North American Styles. Miami-style has many adherents, particularly Cuban-Americans and other Latinos based in South Florida.

Rueda de Casino

In the 1950s Salsa Rueda or more accurately Rueda de Casino was developed in Havana, Cuba. Pairs of dancers form a circle ("Rueda" in Spanish means "Wheel"), with dance moves called out by one person. Many of the moves involve rapidly swapping partners.

"Rueda de Cuba" is original type of Rueda, originating from Cuba. It is not as formal as Rueda de Miami and consists of about 30 calls. It was codified in the 1970s.

"Rueda de Miami" originated in the 1980s from Miami, is a formal style with many rules based on a mix, and is a hybridization of Rueda de Cuba & North American dance styles, with some routines reflecting American culture (e.g. Coca-Cola, Dedo, Adios) which is not found in the traditional Cuban-style Rueda.

Los Angeles style

Salsa Basic Steps, LA-style
Basic step for LA style, with leader's steps in blue
Troupe salsa
Salsa show dancing

The Los Angeles Salsa Style (LA style) is danced strictly on 1, in a slot \ line, using elements of various North American and stage dances. This helps prevent dancers from hitting other couples on a crowded dance floor. It is strongly influenced by the Latin Hustle, Swing, Argentine Tango, Mambo dancers from Mexico and Latin Ballroom dancing styles. LA style places strong emphasis on sensuousness, theatricality and acrobatics. The lifts, stunts and aerial works of today's salsa shows are derived mostly from LA style forms with origins in Latin Ballroom and Ballet lifts.

The two essential elements of this dance are the forward–backward basic step and the cross-body lead. In this pattern, the leader steps forward on 1, steps to the right on 2-3 while turning 90 degrees counter-clockwise (facing to the left), leaving the slot open. The follower then steps straight forward on 5-6 and turns on 7-8, while the leader makes another 90 degrees counter-clockwise and slightly forward, coming back into the slot. After these 8 counts, the leader and follower have exchanged their positions.

Rogelio Moreno, Francisco and Luis Vazquez are credited for the early development and growth of LA Style as well as Albert Torres, Laura Canellias and Joe Cassiniare. Later dancers such as Alex Da Silva, Edie Lewis, Joby Martinez, Josie Neglia, and Johnny Vazquez are often credited with developing the LA style of dancing as we know it today.

New York style

New York style is danced in an ellipse or a "flat figure 8" on the floor, with the partners facing each other most of the time. Unlike other styles of salsa, New York style is danced on the second beat of the music ("on 2"), and the follower, not the leader, steps forward on the first measure of the music. The etiquette of New York Style is strict about remaining in the close dance space, and avoiding dancing in a sandbox area with a lot of spins, turns and styling. There is greater emphasis on performing "shines" in which dancers separate themselves and dance solo with intricate footwork and styling for a time—a phenomenon that likely has origins from Swing and New York Tap.

Though he did not create New York style salsa, Eddie Torres is credited with popularizing it, and for having the follower step forward on the first beat of the first measure, followed by another step forward on the second beat to change direction (the "break step").

There are two distinct developments of New York salsa as a music and dance genre:

  1. Primary evolution from Mambo era was introduced to New York due to influx of migrating dissidents from all the Caribbean and other Latin migrants during Pre/Post Cuban Revolution in the 1950s and 1960s. This era is known as the "Palladium Era". At this time, the music and dance was called "Mambo"—connoting the general term without being specific. The most famous dancer during this era was Puerto-Rican descendant Pedro "Cuban Pete" Aguilar,[7] also known "The King of Latin Beat".
  2. Secondary evolution during the late 1970s, Latin Puerto Rican migrants, contributed a lot to the New York salsa development during the "NuYorican" era of Héctor Lavoe which greatly popularized salsa and modern Latin music throughout the world. Puerto Rican salsa superstars were the most important musicians during the era, such as Ray Baretto ("The Godfather") and many others. There are also salsa artists that transcend both periods, notably the legendary Puerto Rican Tito Puente ("The Mambo King").

These two developments create a fusion of a new salsa music and dance genre, different from its Latin American and Caribbean counterparts.

New York style salsa emphasizes harmony with the percussive instruments in salsa music, such as the congas, timbales, and clave, since many or all of those instruments often mark the second beat in the music.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ Boggs 1992, pp. 187-193
  2. ^ Hutchinson 2004, p. 116. Hutchinson says salsa music and dance "both originated with Cuban rhythms that were brought to New York and adopted, adapted, reformulated, and made new by the Puerto Ricans living there."
  3. ^ Catapano 2011
  4. ^ Simon Broughton; Mark Ellingham; Richard Trillo. World Music: Latin and North America, Caribbean, India, Asia and Pacific. Retrieved 2013-12-04.
  5. ^ "Salsa & Latin Dance Congresses". SalsaDanceCongresses.com. Retrieved 2013-12-04.
  6. ^ "Colombian Style Salsa". Salsabythebay.com. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  7. ^ "Cuban Pete, \"La Leyenda\"". Salsapower.com. Retrieved 2016-12-24.
  8. ^ "Add Event | Salsa Congress | Latin Dance". SalsaTraveler.com. 2014-06-20. Retrieved 2016-12-24.

External links

Banjō Ginga

Banjō Ginga (銀河 万丈, Ginga Banjō, born November 12, 1948), sometimes credited as his real name Takashi Tanaka (田中 崇, Tanaka Takashi), is a Japanese voice actor who was born in Kofu, Yamanashi. Ginga is affiliated with Aoni Production. He is married to voice actress Gara Takashima.

Known for his deep baritone voice, his most well-known roles includes Gihren Zabi (Mobile Suit Gundam), Crocodine (Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibōken), Jean Paul Rocchina (Armored Trooper Votoms), Shōhei Harada (Touch), Souther (Fist of the North Star, original 1980s series), Babbo (MÄR), Heihachi Mishima and Jack in Tekken and Jack-2 in Tekken 2, and Liquid Snake and Major Zero in the Metal Gear series.

His hobbies include painting, salsa dance, riding horses and playing music.

Britain's Got Talent (series 8)

Series Eight of Britain's Got Talent, a British talent competition series, began broadcasting in the UK during 2014, from 12 April to 7 June on ITV; because of England's international friendly with Peru, the show took a break on 30 May to avoid clashing with live coverage of the match. The series is most notable for holding auditions in Northern Ireland for the first time, instead of Scotland as had been done since the second series, as well as for the hosts Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly (colloquially known as Ant & Dec) having to stand in for Simon Cowell, after illness forced him to be absent during a day of auditions. It was also the first series in the show's history to have a buzzer used during the live final, and was the first to include the "Golden Buzzer" - a format introduced to the programme, which had begun to appear within the Got Talent franchise since it was first introduced on Germany's Got Talent in 2012.The eighth series was won by boy band Collabro, with opera singer Lucy Kay finishing in second place and singing/rapping duo Bars and Melody in third place. During its broadcast, the series averaged around 9.8 million viewers.

Cuban salsa

In Cuba, a popular dance known as Casino was marketed abroad as Cuban-style salsa or Salsa Cubana to distinguish it from other salsa styles when the name was popularized in the 1970s.

Dancing Casino is an expression of popular social culture; Many Cubans consider casino a part of their social and cultural activities centering on their popular music.

The origins of the name Casino are casinos deportivos, the dance halls where a lot of social dancing was done among the better off, white Cubans during the mid-1950s and onward.

Historically, Casino traces its origin as a partner dance from Son Cubano, fused with partner figures and turns adopted from the Cuban Mambo, Cuban Cha Cha Cha, Rumba Guaguancó and North American Jive. As with Son, Danzón and Cha Cha Cha, it is traditionally, though less often today, danced a contratiempo. This means that, distinct from subsequent forms of salsa, no step is taken on the first and fifth beats in each clave pattern and the fourth and eighth beat are emphasised. In this way, rather than following a beat, the dancers themselves contribute in their movement, to the polyrythmic pattern of the music.

What gives the dance its life, however, is not its mechanical technique, but understanding and spontaneous use of the rich Afro-Cuban dance vocabulary within a Casino dance. In the same way that a sonero (lead singer in Son and Salsa bands) may "quote" other, older songs in their own, a Casino dancer frequently improvises references to other dances, integrating movements, gestures and extended passages from the folkloric and popular heritage. This is particularly true of African descended Cubans. Such improvisations might include extracts of rumba, dances for African deities, the older popular dances such as Cha Cha Cha and Danzón as well as anything the dancer may feel.

Dance in the Netherlands

There is great variety in dance in the Netherlands.

The traditional dance is the Dutch folk dance; however, this is hardly practiced anymore. Many Dutch practise ballroom dancing, but also tango has a large following.

Many young girls start their dancing career with classical ballet and jazz dance.

Only a few dances are invented by the Dutch. Most of the Folk Dances are Scottish in origin. The Dutch are inventors of Hakken, which was mainly danced in the Hardcore techno and Gabber scene in the 1990s. Jumpen, which was invented in Belgium, developed further in the Netherlands. The Netherlands is one of the leading countries in the Brazilian version of zouk (a successor to lambada).

The reality show and competition Dancing with the Stars has popularized Ballroom dancing and the Dutch version of So You Think You Can Dance helps the popularity of modern dance in the Netherlands. Ice dance has been popularised by the TV shows Dancing on Ice and Sterren Dansen Op Het IJs.

Eddie Torres

Eddie Torres (born July 3, 1950), also known as "The Mambo King", is a salsa dance instructor. Torres' technique developed from various sources including Afro-Cuban son, mambo, and North American jazz dance. He is one of the more popular dancers of New York style salsa. He is famous for his way of dancing and teaching salsa, with the female starting to move forward (always On 2 timing). Torres' style can be contrasted with the more showy Los Angeles style.Eddie has been dancing and teaching salsa for over four decades, he has trained thousands of dancers, including some of the most important dancers and instructors of the Big Apple and all over the planet like Delille Thomas (Mambo D), Wilton Beltre (the founder of Santo Rico Dance Company), Adolfo Indacochea, Franklin Diaz, Frankie Martinez, Arieh Alexander, and Seaon Bristol. He also has a children's dance program that teaches approximately three hundred students a year.

Eppleby

Eppleby is a village and civil parish in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. It is located about 7 miles north of Richmond.

The village is built around two village greens (The Green and Low Green). There is a public house (The Cross Keys) and a village shop and tea room. There is also a primary school (Eppleby Forcett C of E School). The Village Hall is used as a venue for a range of activities and events including dances, meetings, badminton, taekwondo and salsa dance lessons.

Henri Velandia

Henri Velandia (sometimes styled as Henry Velandia) (born July 20, 1983) is a Venezuelan dancer. He is most notable for his performance on season 1 of the Univision television program Mira Quién Baila ('Look Who's Dancing'). He is the founder and lead instructor of HotSalsaHot, a salsa dance school located in Princeton, NJ.

Nelson Batista

Nelson Batista is a Cuban salsa dancer.

Pedro Gomez (dance instructor)

Pedro Gomez (born c. 1963) is a Salsa dance instructor from Cuba.

Pedro Gómez

Pedro or Pedro Gómez may refer to:

Pedro Gómez Labrador, Marquis of Labrador (1755–1852), Spanish diplomat and nobleman

Pedro Gomez (journalist) (born 1962), Cuban-American sports reporter for ESPN's Sportscenter television show

Pedro Gomez (dance instructor) (born 1963), Cuban Salsa dance instructor

Pedro Nel Gómez (1899–1984), Colombian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor

Pedro Gómez Valderrama (1923–1992), Colombian lawyer, writer and diplomat

Pedro Gómez de la Serna (1806–1871), Spanish jurist and politician

Pedro Daniel Gómez (born 1990), Mexican racewalker

Pedro Gomes (triathlete) (born 1983), Portuguese triathlete

Pedro Gómez Gómez (born 1970), Mexican politician

Rubén Blades

Rubén Blades Bellido de Luna (born July 16, 1948), known professionally as Rubén Blades (Spanish: [ruˈβem ˈblaðes], but [ˈbleðz] in Panama and within the family), is a Panamanian singer, songwriter, actor, musician, activist, and politician, performing musically most often in the Afro-Cuban, salsa, and Latin jazz genres. As a songwriter, Blades brought the lyrical sophistication of Central American nueva canción and Cuban nueva trova as well as experimental tempos and politically inspired Nuyorican salsa to his music, creating "thinking persons' (salsa) dance music". Blades has written dozens of hit songs, including "Pedro Navaja", "El Cantante" (which became Héctor Lavoe's signature song), and "Patria", which many Panamanians consider their second national anthem. He has won eight Grammy Awards and five Latin Grammy Awards.His acting career began in 1983, and has continued, sometimes with several-year breaks to focus on other projects. He has prominent roles in films such as Crossover Dreams (1985), The Milagro Beanfield War (1988), Predator 2 (1992), Color of Night (1994), Safe House (2012), The Counselor (2013) and Hands of Stone (2016), along with three Emmy Award nominations for his performances in The Josephine Baker Story (1991), Crazy from the Heart (1992) and The Maldonado Miracle (2003). Since 2015, he has portrayed Daniel Salazar, a main character on the TV series Fear the Walking Dead.

He is an icon in Panama and is much admired throughout Latin America and Spain, and managed to attract 17% of the vote in his failed attempt to win the Panamanian presidency in 1994. In September 2004, he was appointed minister of tourism by Panamanian president Martín Torrijos for a five-year term. He holds a Bachelor of Arts' Law degree from the University of Panama and an LL.M in International Law from Harvard University. He is married to singer Luba Mason.

Rueda de Casino

Rueda de Casino (Rueda) is a particular type of Salsa round dance, born from Casino. People incorrectly call it "Casino Rueda" or "Cuban Salsa." The origins of the name Casino are the casinos deportivos, the dance halls where a lot of social dancing was done among the affluent, white Cubans during the mid-20th century and onward. Casino danced with multiple partners in a circular fashion emerged in 1956 under the name "Rueda del Casino," and has become a popular dance throughout the world.

Salsa People

Salsa People is an independent, co-educational academy specialising in Salsa, Bachata and Kizomba dance. It is based in Zurich, Switzerland.

Swing Latino

Swing Latino is a salsa dance school academy from Cali, Colombia, founded in the late 1990s by its current director, dancer and choreographer, Luis Eduardo Hernandez (also known as "El Mulato").They are known for their appearance in the Fox TV show ¡Q'Viva! The Chosen.Swing Latino has won multiple salsa dance contests in their home country Colombia and in the United States including the 2004 World Congress "Salsa Open" in Philadelphia, the 2005 World Salsa Dancing Federation's Championship, in Miami and the 2006 and 2007 Las Vegas Salsa Championship, which aired in ESPN.

Swing Latino has also performed abroad in Puerto Rico and toured throughout the United Kingdom.

Tobias Daniels

Tobias Daniels (born November 16, 1982 in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey) is an American filmmaker.

Tobias is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles. He is the former West Coast videographer for PopStar! Magazine, and has been featured on Indiewire and AFROPUNK. Prior to stepping behind the lens he struck the famous gloves-over-the-head victory pose playing a young Muhammad Ali for acclaimed photographer David LaChapelle’s poster print of Ali’ in G.O.A.T.

He was co-creator of America’s first salsa dance video for kids Creative Child Magazine’s Preferred Choice Award Winning - Salsa with Me. In 2012 he executive produced Janked which screened at the Cannes Film Market. His upcoming Feature Length Documentary on LGBT performance artist: Black Velvet features camera work by Emmy Award winning camera operator Greg Harriott from Born to Explore.

Victor Cruz (American football)

Victor Michael Cruz (born November 11, 1986) is a former American football wide receiver. He played college football at UMass, and signed with the New York Giants as an undrafted free agent in 2010. With the Giants he won Super Bowl XLVI over the New England Patriots, and made the 2012 Pro Bowl.

World Dance New York

World Dance New York is a US home entertainment company, releasing and distributing special interest titles on DVD, video on demand, streaming media, iPhone and iPad apps, and a brand of women's dance and fitness home video products. It was founded in 2001 as "Stratostream - World Dance New York". "Stratostream" designates the company in the business-to-business environment, the home video industry, while "World Dance New York" is the publicly-recognized brand and the name of the consumer-facing operation of the company.

Xochicalco University

Xochicalco University (Spanish: Centro de Estudios Universitarios Xochicalco) is a private university with campuses in Tijuana, Ensenada, and Mexicali in Baja California, Mexico. The university has a medical school as well as an International Medical Graduate (IMG) program. Additionally, the university offers programs in optometry, medicine, law, MBA,architecture, education,criminology, graphic design and psychology.The school offers a trilingual High school program where students take three hours of French per week and half of their subjects in Spanish meantime the rest in English. En pocas palabras la escuela es una mierda

It also counts with sport teams best known as "Coyotes" such as:

° Volleyball

° Sport Animation

° Soccer

° Flag Football

° Football

° Basketball

Civic and cultural activities are also part of the school to name a few the school has

° Arts

° Music

° Chess

° Theater

° Salsa dance

° Photography

° Self Defense

° Jazz

Participation
Social context
Major present-day genres
Technique
Regional traditions
Related
Hip-hop
House dance
Rave dance
Jazz dance
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