Sal Bando

Salvatore Leonard Bando (born February 13, 1944) is a former third baseman and executive in professional baseball who played for the Kansas City and Oakland Athletics (1966–76) and Milwaukee Brewers (1977–81). He played college baseball at Arizona State University for coach Bobby Winkles.

Sal Bando
Sal Bando by Gage Skidmore
Third baseman
Born: February 13, 1944 (age 75)
Cleveland, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 3, 1966, for the Kansas City Athletics
Last MLB appearance
October 3, 1981, for the Milwaukee Brewers
MLB statistics
Batting average.254
Home runs242
Runs batted in1,039
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

During the A's championship years of 1971-75, he captained the team and led the club in runs batted in three times. He was the second American League third baseman to hit 200 career home runs, joining Brooks Robinson, and retired among the all-time leaders in games (5th, 1896), assists (6th, 3720) and double plays (7th, 345) at his position. In a 16-season career, Bando was a .254 hitter with 242 home runs and 1039 RBI in 2019 games played. His younger brother Chris was a catcher for the Cleveland Indians.

Over four consecutive American League Championship Series from 1971–74, he hit five home runs in 17 games, including two in a 1973 game and a solo shot in Game 3 of the 1974 ALCS, a 1-0 victory.

Playing almost exclusively at third base in Oakland, Bando played every infield position while with the Brewers, even making one appearance as a relief pitcher in a 1979 game.

Post-playing career

After retiring, Bando briefly served as a color analyst for NBC (teaming with Bob Costas[1] on telecasts), then became a front office executive with the Brewers. He was named the team's general manager on October 8, 1991.

Bando built only one winning team in over seven years as GM. That team, the 1992 Brewers, was largely composed of players he inherited from his predecessor Harry Dalton. They ended the season with 92 wins and 70 losses under the only manager Bando ever hired in his tenure as GM, Phil Garner, his former teammate in Oakland.

One of the lowlights of his tenure happened after that 1992 season when the club did not offer Paul Molitor salary arbitration until the 11th hour. Molitor signed a free-agent deal with the Toronto Blue Jays. At the time, Bando was quoted as disparaging Molitor as "only a (designated hitter)". The following season, Molitor was named the World Series MVP as the Blue Jays won their second championship. This was noted by some as one of the worst public relations blunders in Brewers history, although Bando has since claimed that his words were taken out of context.[2]

Bando held his position as GM until August 12, 1999. He was reassigned within the organization and replaced by former Atlanta Braves assistant GM Dean Taylor.

Bando did a voice cameo in the 2006 episode of The Simpsons titled "Regarding Margie."[3]

Currently, Bando is CEO of Middleton Doll Company, a Columbus, Ohio enterprise with multiple other businesses associated with it.[4] He is also a Catholic and involved in some Catholic organizations.[5][6]

Bando's son, Sal Bando, Jr., was the head baseball coach at High Point University from 2001 to 2008 and compiled a 144–243 record. As of 2010,[7] Sal Bando Jr. is the head baseball coach at Marquette University High School. He has led the team to two straight state championship appearances.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ Kalb, Elliott (22 March 2012). "At 60, Costas remains at top of his game". MLB Network. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  2. ^ http://www2.jsonline.com/sports/brew/jul04/244366.asp
  3. ^ "Sal Bando makes cameo on". OnMilwaukee.com. 2006-05-07. Retrieved 2019-07-25.
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ National Catholic Register
  6. ^ Catholic Athletes for Christ
  7. ^ "Sal Bando Jr. is new MUHS baseball coach". www.jsonline.com. Retrieved 2019-07-25.
  8. ^ "Sal Bando Jr. is new MUHS baseball coach". www.jsonline.com. Retrieved 2019-07-25.

External links

Preceded by
Harry Dalton
Milwaukee Brewers General Manager
19911999
Succeeded by
Dean Taylor
1965 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team

The 1965 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team represented Arizona State University in the 1965 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached by Bobby Winkles in his 7th season at Arizona State.

The Sun Devils won the College World Series, defeating the Ohio State Buckeyes in the championship game.

1965 Major League Baseball draft

The 1965 Major League Baseball Draft is the first year in which a draft took place for Major League Baseball. It was held on June 8–9 in New York City.In Major League Baseball's first Free Agent Amateur Draft, the Kansas City Athletics selected Arizona State sophomore Rick Monday as the number one pick. Kansas City also chose ten future major leaguers, including Sal Bando (6th round) and Gene Tenace (20th round), building the base for the Oakland Athletics' championship teams of the early 1970s.

A total of 813 players were selected. Some of the more significant picks were catcher Johnny Bench by the Cincinnati Reds in the second round, pitcher Nolan Ryan by the New York Mets in the twelfth round, and infielder Graig Nettles by the Minnesota Twins in the fourth round. The first player to reach the majors was pitcher Joe Coleman, the Washington Senators' first pick and third pick overall. Future Hall of Famer Tom Seaver was selected by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 10th round but did not sign and returned to the University of Southern California campus.

1965 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1965 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1965 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its nineteenth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 23 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The nineteenth tournament's champion was Arizona State, coached by Bobby Winkles. The Most Outstanding Player was Sal Bando of Arizona State.

1968 Oakland Athletics season

The 1968 Oakland Athletics season was the franchise's 68th season and its first in Oakland, California. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 82 wins and 80 losses, placing them 21 games behind the eventual World Series champion Detroit Tigers. The Athletics' paid attendance for the season was 837,466.

The 1968 season represented a tremendous breakthrough for the Athletics organization. The campaign resulted in their first winning record since 1952, when they were still located in Philadelphia. Moreover, the Athletics' 82 wins marked a 20-win increase over the prior year's 62–99 mark. The team's young core of Jim "Catfish" Hunter, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Reggie Jackson, Sal Bando, Gene Tenace, and Rick Monday began to gel; all of these young players (with the exception of Monday, who would be traded in 1971 for pitcher Ken Holtzman) would power the Athletics' forthcoming 1970's dynasty.

1969 Oakland Athletics season

The 1969 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's compiling a record of 88 wins and 74 losses. With its expansion to 12 teams in 1969, the American League had been divided into two 6-team divisions. In their first year in the newly established American League West, the Athletics finished second, nine games behind the Minnesota Twins. It was the first time they had finished in the first division since 1952. Paid attendance for the season was 778,232.

1971 Oakland Athletics season

The 1971 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League West with a record of 101 wins and 60 losses. In their first postseason appearance of any kind since 1931, the A's were swept in three games by the Baltimore Orioles in the American League Championship Series.

1973 Oakland Athletics season

The 1973 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning their third consecutive American League West title with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses. The A's went on to defeat the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS for their second straight AL Championship, and won the World Series in seven games over the New York Mets to take their second consecutive World Championship.

1974 American League Championship Series

The 1974 American League Championship Series was a best-of-five matchup between the East Division Champion Baltimore Orioles and the West Division Champion Oakland A's. It was a rematch of the previous year's series and third overall between the two teams. The A's beat the Orioles three games to one and received their third straight pennant in the process. They defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1974 World Series and won their third straight World Series championship.

1974 Oakland Athletics season

The 1974 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning their fourth consecutive American League West title with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. In the playoffs, the A's defeated the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS for their third straight AL pennant, and in the World Series, the first ever played entirely on the West Coast, defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games to take their third consecutive World Series championship. Paid attendance for the season was 845,693.In early 1974, owner Charlie Finley tried to sell the team with an asking price of $15 million.

1974 World Series

The 1974 World Series matched the two-time defending champions Oakland Athletics against the Los Angeles Dodgers with the A's winning the Series in five games.

Rollie Fingers figured in three of the four Oakland victories, posting a win and two saves, and was honored as the Series MVP. Oakland became the first team to win three consecutive Series since the New York Yankees won five in a row between 1949 and 1953; the win secured the Athletics' status as one of the truly dominant teams of the 1970s. (The other "team of the decade," the Cincinnati Reds, would check in with consecutive Series victories in 1975 and 1976.)

The 1974 Fall Classic was the first all-California World Series. These two teams would meet again in the fall classic 14 years later in 1988.

1976 Oakland Athletics season

The 1976 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's finishing second in the American League West with a record of 87 wins and 74 losses, 2½ games behind the Kansas City Royals, meaning that the A's failed to make the playoffs for the first time since 1970. This team set and still holds the modern Major League team record for most stolen bases in a season with 341.The Athletics would not eclipse this season's win total until 1988 (when they won 104). Indeed, nearly all of the team's stars (Sal Bando, Rollie Fingers, Gene Tenace, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Don Baylor, Phil Garner, Billy Williams, Claudell Washington, and an injury-plagued Willie McCovey) would depart during the 1976–77 offseason. This staggering mass exodus contributed led to a 24-win plunge in 1977.

1977 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1977 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing sixth in the American League East with a record of 67 wins and 95 losses.

1979 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1979 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing second in the American League East with a record of 95 wins and 66 losses.

Dave Frost

Carl David Frost (born November 17, 1952) is an American former professional baseball player and a former Major League Baseball pitcher. The 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m), 235 lb (107 kg) right-hander was drafted by the Chicago White Sox in the 18th round of the 1974 Major League Baseball draft. During a five-year Major League career, Frost played for the White Sox (1978), California Angels (1978–1981), and Kansas City Royals (1982).

Frost made his MLB debut on September 11, 1977 against the California Angels at Anaheim Stadium. He turned in a quality start, pitching 6​1⁄3 innings and giving up just two earned runs. He struck out three, walked none, and received a no decision in the 5-4 White Sox loss. His first big league win came a week later in another great start against the Angels, this time at Comiskey Park. He went 7​2⁄3 innings, gave up three runs, and won 7–3.

He was traded to the Angels on December 5, 1977 in a six-player deal, and became a valuable addition to the Angel pitching staff. He split time between Salt Lake City (PCL) and the big leagues in 1978, and went 5–4 with a 2.58 earned run average in 11 games (ten starts) for the Angels. Next year would be even better.

Frost had his biggest year in 1979. He won 16, lost 10, and led Angel starters in ERA (3.57), winning percentage (.615), and innings pitched (239​1⁄3). California had an impressive group of starters that year, including Frost, Nolan Ryan, Don Aase, Jim Barr, Chris Knapp, and Frank Tanana. They ultimately won the American League West Division pennant that year with an 88–74 record.

Unfortunately, elbow problems severely limited Frost's effectiveness the remainder of his career. In the next three seasons (two with the Angels and one with the Kansas City Royals) he was a combined 11–22 with a 5.43 ERA.

Career totals for 99 games pitched include a 33-37 record, 84 games started, 16 complete games, 3 shutouts, 1 save, and 7 games finished. He allowed 251 earned runs in 550​2⁄3 innings pitched, giving him a lifetime ERA of 4.10.

Career highlights include:

A four-hit, no walk complete game shutout vs. the Oakland A's (July 3, 1979)

An eight-strikeout, no walk complete game win (10–1) vs. the Baltimore Orioles (July 7, 1979)

A ten-inning, four-hit complete game win (2–1) vs. the Minnesota Twins (April 16, 1980)

Held All-Stars Sal Bando, Buddy Bell, Mike Hargrove, Rickey Henderson, Roy Howell, Pat Kelly, Hal McRae, Willie Randolph, Jim Rice, and Roy Smalley to a .103 collective batting average (15-for-145)

Held Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson, Cal Ripken, Jr., and Robin Yount to a .167 collective batting average (3-for-18)

Threw the opening pitch at a Los Angeles Angels game on Monday, June 27, 2011.

Harry Dalton

Harry I. Dalton (August 23, 1928 – October 23, 2005) was an American front-office executive in Major League Baseball. He served as general manager of three American League teams, the Baltimore Orioles (1966–71), California Angels (1972–77) and Milwaukee Brewers (1978–91), and was a principal architect of the Orioles' dynasty of 1966–74 as well as the only AL championship the Brewers ever won (1982).

Born in West Springfield, Massachusetts—also the hometown of Baseball Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher—Dalton graduated from Amherst College and served in the United States Air Force during the Korean War, earning a Bronze Star. After a brief stint as a sportswriter in Springfield, he joined the front office of the Orioles, newly reborn as the relocated St. Louis Browns, in 1954. For the next 11 years, Dalton worked his way up the organizational ladder, rising to the position of director of the Orioles' successful farm system in 1961.In the autumn of 1965, Baltimore general manager Lee MacPhail departed to become top aide to the new Commissioner of Baseball, William Eckert. Dalton was named Director of Player Personnel—in effect, MacPhail's successor. His first order of business was to complete a trade that brought Cincinnati Reds outfielder Frank Robinson to Baltimore for pitchers Milt Pappas and Jack Baldschun and a minor league outfielder. Robinson, 1961 National League Most Valuable Player, was one of the greatest stars in the game, but he had developed a strained relationship with the Cincinnati front office. In Baltimore, he would team with third baseman Brooks Robinson to lead the O's to the 1966 and 1970 World Series championships, and pennants in 1969 and 1971. Dalton was the man who hired Earl Weaver as manager, brought to the Majors young stars such as Bobby Grich and Don Baylor, and acquired key players such as Mike Cuellar, Pat Dobson and Don Buford. (Weaver, Frank Robinson and Brooks Robinson, along with pitching great Jim Palmer, a product of Dalton's farm system, are all in the Hall in Fame.)

After the Orioles lost the 1971 World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates, Dalton was hired to turn around a stumbling Angels franchise. He acquired the great pitcher Nolan Ryan in a December 1971 trade with the New York Mets, but during Dalton's six seasons in Anaheim the team never posted a winning record. After the 1977 season, the Angels hired veteran executive Buzzie Bavasi as Dalton's boss, then released Dalton from his contract so that he could become the general manager of the Brewers.

Milwaukee had a group of talented young players, such as Robin Yount, Cecil Cooper and rookie Paul Molitor, but the nine-year-old franchise had never had a winning season. In 1978, Dalton hired George Bamberger, Weaver's pitching coach for many years, as the Brewers' new manager, and the team gelled into contenders in the American League East Division. By 1981, they made the playoffs and in 1982, Milwaukee won its first and only American League pennant (the Brewers moved to the National League Central Division in 1998). In the 1982 World Series, the "Harvey's Wallbangers" Brewers of manager Harvey Kuenn lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games.

The Brewers contended in 1983, but then began to struggle on the field. The team rebounded in 1987 and 1988, but when it returned to its losing ways, Dalton's position was weakened. After a poor 1991 season, he was replaced as general manager by Sal Bando. Dalton, who remained a consultant in the Milwaukee front office through his 1994 retirement, nevertheless was one of the most respected men in baseball, who had trained other successful general managers such as John Schuerholz, Lou Gorman and Dan Duquette, a fellow Amherst alumnus.On July 24, 2003, Dalton was inducted into the Milwaukee Brewers Walk of Fame outside Miller Park.

Harry Dalton died at age 77 in Scottsdale, Arizona, of complications from Lewy body disease, misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease.

John Dolinsek

John N. Dolinsek (born January 3, 1948 in Santa Rosa, CA) was an outfielder who is most notable for winning the 1969 College World Series Most Outstanding Player award while a junior at Arizona State University. He is one of five players from Arizona State University to win that award. The others are Sal Bando, Ron Davini, Bob Horner and Stan Holmes.

Drafted by the Houston Astros in the eighth round of the 1969 draft, Dolinsek played five years in the minors, never reaching the big leagues. He played for the Covington Astros in 1969, hitting .301 with seven home runs in 59 games. For the Columbus Astros in 1970, he hit .296 eight home runs in 137 games. In 1971, he played for the Oklahoma City 89ers, hitting .288 with 14 home runs and 70 RBI in 124 games. He split the 1972 season between the 89ers and Peninsula Whips, hitting a combined .296 with 11 home runs in 442 at-bats. He played his final professional season in 1973, for the Denver Bears. He hit .274 with nine homers that year.

Mr Dolinsek enjoys slow pitch softball and crosswords in his retirement.

It's been reported by CNN and TMZ that Mr. Dolinsek will be a 2019 contestant on the ABC television series Dancing With The Stars. Dancing With The Stars pairs a number of well known (and less well known) celebrities with professional ballroom dancers, who each week compete by performing one or more choreographed routines that follow the prearranged theme for that particular week.

Oakland Athletics award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Oakland Athletics professional baseball franchise.

The team was first known as the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1954 and then as the Kansas City Athletics from 1955 to 1967.

Ron Davini

Ronald Lee Davini (born May 5, 1947) was a catcher who is most notable for winning the 1967 College World Series Most Outstanding Player award while a junior at Arizona State University. He is one of five players from Arizona State University to win that award. The others are Sal Bando, John Dolinsek, Bob Horner and Stan Holmes. Prior to playing collegiately, he attended Anaheim High School.

He was also a Western Athletic Conference All-Star twice (in 1967 and 1968).

Stan Holmes

Stanley Craig "Stan" Holmes (February 1, 1960 – February 28, 2011) was a college and minor league baseball outfielder who is most notable for winning the College World Series MVP award in 1981.

Holmes was born in Dos Palos, California, where in high school one of his baseball teammates was future major leaguer Dave Henderson. Holmes played college baseball at Arizona State University and won the Most Outstanding Player award at the 1981 College World Series as a senior. He is one of five players from Arizona State University to win that award. The others are Sal Bando, John Dolinsek, Bob Horner and Ron Davini.

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