Saga Nishiki

Saga Nishiki (佐賀錦 Saga-nishiki) is a form of brocading from Saga Prefecture, Japan. It is a unique form of brocading in that Japanese paper is used as the warp. This paper is coated in either gold, silver or lacquer. The weft is a silk thread which is dyed. As the technique is time-consuming, only several inches are produced each day.[1]

Saga nishiki 1
A Saga Nishiki work

History

Saga Nishiki was created at the end of the Edo period by Kashima Nabeshima, the daimyō of Saga. At this time it was referred to as Kashima Nishiki. It was not until the Japan–British Exhibition of 1910 that it was renamed "Saga Nishiki".[2]

Gallery

Saga nishiki 2

A woman brocades

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A Saga nishiki fabric

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A Saga nishiki fabric

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A handbag

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A handbag

Saga Nishiki 7

A handbag

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A brooch

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The gold threads used in the brocade

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Detail of a Saga nishiki design

References

  1. ^ Saga Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Saga Nishiki Process, August 2, 2007.
  2. ^ Saga Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Saga Nishiki History, August 2, 2007.

External links

See also

Airdura

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Barathea

Barathea, sometimes spelled barrathea, is a soft fabric, with a hopsack twill weave giving a surface that is lightly pebbled or ribbed. The yarns used cover various combinations of wool, silk and cotton. Worsted barathea (made with a smooth wool yarn) is often used for evening coats, such as dress coats, dinner jackets, and military uniforms, in black and midnight blue. Silk barathea, either all silk, or using cotton weft and silken warp, is widely used in the necktie industry.

Beetling

For the study and collection of beetles, see coleopterology.

Beetling is the pounding of linen or cotton fabric to give a flat, lustrous effect.

Boiled wool

Boiled wool is a type of fabric primarily used in creating berets, scarves, vests, cardigans, coats, and jackets. To create this fabric, knit wool or wool-blend fabrics are agitated with hot water in a process called fulling. This process shrinks the fabric and results in a dense felted fabric that resists fraying and further shrinkage.

Georgette (fabric)

Georgette (from crêpe Georgette) is a sheer, lightweight, dull-finished crêpe fabric named after the early 20th century French dressmaker Georgette de la Plante.Originally made from silk, Georgette is made with highly twisted yarns. Its characteristic crinkly surface is created by alternating S- and Z-twist yarns in both warp and weft.Georgette is made in solid colors and prints and is used for blouses, dresses, evening gowns, saris, and trimmings. It is springier and less lustrous than the closely related chiffon.

Kelsch d'Alsace

Kelsch d'Alsace is textile of linen and cotton manufactured in Alsace, France.

Lampas

Lampas is a type of luxury fabric with a background weft (a "ground weave") typically in taffeta with supplementary wefts (the "pattern wefts") laid on top and forming a design, sometimes also with a "brocading weft". Lampas is typically woven in silk, and often has gold and silver thread enrichment.

List of fabrics

Fabrics in this list include fabrics that are woven, braided or knitted from textile fibres.

Ninon

Ninon is a sheer fabric of silk, rayon, or nylon made in a variety of tight smooth weaves, open lacy patterns, or open mesh-like appearance. It is described as very delicate or lightweight and is sometimes referred to as "French tergal". Available in a variety of solid colors and tone-on-tone woven vertical stripes. Some ninon fabrics have embroidered borders. Because the fabric is made with high twist filament yarns, it has a crisp hand. End uses include eveningwear, doll clothes and curtains.

Organdy

Organdy or organdie is the sheerest and crispest cotton cloth made. Combed yarns contribute to its appearance.

Organza

Organza is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk. Many modern organzas are woven with synthetic filament fibers such as polyester or nylon. Silk organza is woven by a number of mills along the Yangtze River and in the province of Zhejiang in China. A coarser silk organza is woven in the Bangalore area of India. Deluxe silk organzas are woven in France and Italy.Organza is used for bridalwear and eveningwear. In the interiors market it is used for effects in bedrooms and between rooms. Double-width organzas in viscose and acetate are used as sheer curtains.

Ottoman (textile)

Ottoman is a fabric with a pronounced ribbed or corded effect, often made of silk or a mixture of cotton and other silk like yarns. It is mostly used for formal dress and in particular, legal dress (such as QC gowns) and academic dress (mostly for hoods).

Ottoman made of pure silk is very expensive so artificial silk is used instead to create a cheaper alternative.

Grosgrain is similar to Ottoman but it is thinner and lighter than Ottoman and is used mostly for ribbons.

Pile (textile)

Pile is the raised surface or nap of a fabric, consisting of upright loops or strands of yarn. Examples of pile textiles are carpets, corduroy, velvet, plush, and Turkish towels. The word is derived from Latin pilus for "hair"

Rōketsuzome

Rōketsuzome or short rōzome is a traditional wax-resist textile dyeing technique in Japan, akin to Indonesian batik.

Tattersall (cloth)

Tattersall describes a check or plaid pattern woven into cloth. The pattern is composed of regularly-spaced thin, even vertical warp stripes, repeated horizontally in the weft, thereby forming squares.

The stripes are usually in two alternating colours, generally darker on a light ground. The cloth pattern takes its name from Tattersall's horse market, which was started in London in 1766. During the 18th century at Tattersall's horse market blankets with this checked pattern were sold for use on horses.Today tattersall is a common pattern, often woven in cotton, particularly in flannel, used for shirts or waistcoats. Tattersall shirts, along with gingham, are often worn in country attire, for example in combination with tweed suits and jackets. Traditional shirts of this cloth are often used by horseback riders in formal riding attire, and adorned with a stock tie.

Tucuyo

Tucuyo is a type of coarse cotton cloth made in Latin America.

Waffle fabric

Waffle fabric, or sometimes honeycomb fabric, is usually made of cotton or microfibre and is woven in a way which makes it very absorbent. The waffle weave also allows air to flow through the fabric so that it dries quickly. Waffle fabrics are made in a range of weights.

Waffle fabric is used for cleaning surfaces in industry. The surface of the fabric is textured rather like a culinary waffle, hence the name. This texture gives more surface area for absorption and cleaning than a normal flat surface. It is woven on a loom.

Woven fabric

Woven fabric is any textile formed by weaving. Woven fabrics are often created on a loom, and made of many threads woven on a warp and a weft. Technically, a woven fabric is any fabric made by interlacing two or more threads at right angles to one another.

Woven
Figured woven
Pile woven
Nonwoven
Knitted
Netted
Technical
Patterns
Textile fibers
Fabric mills
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