Rusty-spotted cat

The rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus) is one of the cat family's smallest members, of which historical records are known only from India and Sri Lanka.[3] In 2012, it was also recorded in the western Terai of Nepal.[4] Since 2016, the global wild population is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List as it is fragmented and affected by loss and destruction of prime habitat, deciduous forests.[2]

Rusty-spotted cat
Rusty spotted cat 1
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Felidae
Subfamily: Felinae
Genus: Prionailurus
Species:
P. rubiginosus[1]
Binomial name
Prionailurus rubiginosus[1]
Prionailurus rubiginosus range map
Rusty-spotted cat range

Characteristics

Rustyspottedcatskull
Illustration of skull, in Pocock's The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma[3]

The rusty-spotted cat is the smallest wild cat in Asia and rivals the black-footed cat as the world's smallest wild cat. It is 35 to 48 cm (14 to 19 in) in length, with a 15 to 30 cm (5.9 to 11.8 in) tail, and weighs only 0.9 to 1.6 kg (2.0 to 3.5 lb). The short fur is grey over most of the body, with rusty spots over the back and flanks, while the underbelly is white with large dark spots. The darker colored tail is thick and about half the length of the body, and the spots are less distinct. There are six dark streaks on each side of the head, extending over the cheeks and forehead.[5]

Taxonomy

Felis rubiginosa was the scientific name used by Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire in 1831 for a rusty-spotted cat specimen from Pondicherry, India.[6] Prionailurus was proposed by Nikolai Severtzov in 1858 as a generic name.[7] Prionailurus rubiginosus phillipsi was proposed by Reginald Innes Pocock in 1939 who described a specimen from Central Province, Sri Lanka and subordinated both to the genus Prionailurus.[3]

Distribution and habitat

Rustyspottedcat
Rusty-spotted cat photographed in the Anaimalai Hills in southern India
Rusty spotted cat 2
Rusty-spotted cat in its natural habitat

The distribution of the rusty-spotted cat is relatively restricted. It occurs mainly in moist and dry deciduous forests as well as scrub and grassland, but is likely absent from evergreen forest.[8] It prefers dense vegetation and rocky areas.[9][10]

In India, it was long thought to be confined to the south, but records have established that it is found over much of the country.[8] It was observed in eastern Gujarat's Gir National Park, in Maharashtra's Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve and along India's Eastern Ghats.[10][11][12][13][14] Camera trapping revealed its presence in Pilibhit Tiger Reserve in the Indian Terai and in Nagzira Wildlife Sanctuary in Maharashtra.[15][16] In western Maharashtra, there is a breeding population of rusty-spotted cats in a human dominated agricultural landscape, where rodent densities are high.[17] In December 2014 and in April 2015, it was photographed by camera traps in Kalesar National Park, Haryana.[18]

In March 2012, a rusty-spotted cat was photographed for the first time in Bardia National Park, and in March 2016 also in Suklaphanta Wildlife Reserve, both in Nepal.[4][19]

In Sri Lanka, there are a few records from montane and lowland rainforest. There are two distinct populations, one in the dry zone and the other in the wet zone.[20] In 2016, it was recorded for the first time in Horton Plains National Park at altitudes of 2,084–2,162 m (6,837–7,093 ft).[21]

Ecology and behaviour

Very little is known about ecology and behaviour of rusty-spotted cats in the wild. Captive ones are mostly nocturnal but also briefly active during the day.[5] Most wild ones were also recorded after dark. At Horton Plain National Park in Sri Lanka, they were mostly recorded between sunset and sunrise, with limited daytime activity.[21] Several individuals were observed hiding in trees and in caves.[22][23][24]

They feed mainly on rodents and birds, but may also hunt lizards, frogs, and insects. They hunt primarily on the ground, making rapid, darting movements to catch their prey. They apparently venture into trees to escape larger predators. Captive females and males both scent-mark their home range by spraying urine.[5]

Reproduction

The female's oestrus lasts five days, and mating is unusually brief. Since the female is likely to be vulnerable during this period, its brevity may be an adaptation to help it avoid larger predators. She prepares a den in a secluded location, and after a gestation of 65–70 days gives birth to one or two kittens. At birth, the kittens weigh just 60 to 77 g (2.1 to 2.7 oz), and are marked with rows of black spots. They reach sexual maturity at around 68 weeks, by which time they have developed the distinctive adult coat pattern of rusty blotches. Rusty-spotted cats have lived for twelve years in captivity, but their lifespan in the wild is unknown.[5]

Threats

Habitat loss and the spread of cultivation are serious problems for wildlife in both India and Sri Lanka. Although there are several records of rusty-spotted cats from cultivated and settled areas, it is not known to what degree cat populations are able to persist in such areas. There have been occasional reports of rusty-spotted cat skins in trade.[8] In some areas, they are hunted for food or as livestock pests.[5]

Conservation

Rostkatze Zoo Berlin
Rusty-spotted cat in Berlin Zoo, 2008

The Indian population is listed on CITES Appendix I. The Sri Lankan population is included on CITES Appendix II. The species is fully protected over most of its range, with hunting and trade banned in India and Sri Lanka.[2]

As of 2010, the captive population of P. r. phillipsi comprised 56 individuals in eight institutions, of which 11 individuals were kept in the Colombo Zoo in Sri Lanka and 45 individuals in seven European zoos.[25]

Local names

In Sri Lanka, the rusty-spotted cat is known as "kola diviya" or "balal diviya".[26]

References

  1. ^ Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Species Prionailurus rubiginosus". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 543–544. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  2. ^ a b c Mukherjee, S.; Duckworth, J. W.; Silva, A.; Appel, A. & Kittle, A. (2016). "Prionailurus rubiginosus". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2016: e.T18149A50662471. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T18149A50662471.en. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b c Pocock, R. I. (1939). "Prionailurus rubiginosus Geoffroy. The Rusty-spotted Cat". The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma. Mammalia. – Volume 1. London: Taylor and Francis Ltd. pp. 276–280.
  4. ^ a b Appel, A. (2016). "The first records of Rusty-spotted Cat in Nepal" (PDF). Small Wild Cat Conservation News (2): 8–10.
  5. ^ a b c d e Sunquist, M.; Sunquist, F. (2002). "Rusty-spotted Cat Prionailurus rubiginosus (Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1834)". Wild cats of the World. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 237–240. ISBN 0-226-77999-8.
  6. ^ Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, I. (1831). "Le Chat à Taches de Rouille, Felis rubiginosa (Nob.)". In Bélanger, C.; Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, I. Voyage aux Indes-Orientales par le nord de l’Europe, les provinces du Caucases, la Géorgie, l’Arménie et la Perse, suivi des détails topographiques, statistiques et autre sur le Pégou, les Iles de Jave, de Maurice et de Bourbon, sur le Cap-de-bonne-Espérance et Sainte-Hélène, pendant les années 1825, 1826, 1827, 1828 et 1829. Tome 3: Zoologie. Paris: Arthus Bertrand. pp. 140−144.
  7. ^ Severtzow, M. N. (1858). "Notice sur la classification multisériale des Carnivores, spécialement des Félidés, et les études de zoologie générale qui s'y rattachent". Revue et Magasin de Zoologie Pure et Appliquée. X: 385–396.
  8. ^ a b c Nowell, K.; Jackson, P. (1996). "Rusty-spotted Cat Prionailurus rubiginosus". Wild Cats: status survey and conservation action plan. IUCN/SSC Cat Specialist Group, Gland, Switzerland.
  9. ^ Kittle, A.; Watson, A. (2004). "Rusty-spotted cat in Sri Lanka: observations of an arid zone population". Cat News (40): 17–19.
  10. ^ a b Patel, K. (2006). "Observations of rusty-spotted cat in eastern Gujarat". Cat News (45): 27–28.
  11. ^ Pathak, B. J. (1990). "Rusty spotted cat Felis rubiginosa Geoffroy: A new record for Gir Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park". Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society. 87: 8.
  12. ^ Dubey, Y. (1999). "Sighting of rusty spotted cat in Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve, Maharashtra". Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society. 96 (2): 310.
  13. ^ Manakadan, R.; Sivakumar, S. (2006). "Rusty-spotted cat on India's east coast". Cat News (45): 26.
  14. ^ Behera, S. (2008). "Rusty-spotted Cat in Nagarjunasagar Srisailam Tiger Reserve". Cat News (48): 19.
  15. ^ Anwar, M.; Kumar, H.; Vattakavan, J. (2010). "Range extension of rusty-spotted cat to the Indian Terai". Cat News (53): 25–26.
  16. ^ Patel, K. (2010). "New distribution record data for rusty-spotted cat from Central India". Cat News (53): 26–27.
  17. ^ Athreya, V. (2010). "Rusty-spotted cat more common than we think?". Cat News (53): 27.
  18. ^ Ghaskadbi, P.; Habib, B.; Mir, Z.; Ray, R.; Talukdar, G.; Lyngdoh, S.; Pandav, B.; Nigam, P.; Kaur, A. (2016). "Rusty-spotted Cat in Kalesar National Park and Sanctuary, Haryana, India". Cat News (63): 28–29.
  19. ^ Lamichhane, B. R.; Kadariya, R.; Subedi, N.; Dhakal, B. K.; Dhakal, M.; Thapa, K.; Acharya, K.P. (2016). "Rusty-spotted Cat: 12th cat species discovered in Western Terai of Nepal". Cat News (64): 30–33.
  20. ^ Deraniyagala, P. E. P. (1956). "A new subspecies of rusty spotted cat from Ceylon". Spolia Zeylanica 28: 113.
  21. ^ a b Nimalrathna, T.; Choo, Y. R.; Kudavidanage, E.; Amarasinghe, T.; Bandara, U.; Wanninayaka, W.; Ravindrakumar, P.; Chua, M.A.H.; Webb, E.L. (2019). "First photographic record of the Rusty-spotted Cat Prionailurus rubiginosus (I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1831) (Mammalia: Carnivora: Felidae) in Horton Plains National Park, Sri Lanka". Journal of Threatened Taxa. 11 (4): 13506–13510. doi:10.11609/jott.4094.11.4.13506-13510.
  22. ^ Patel, K. (2011). "Preliminary survey of small cats in Eastern Gujarat, India". Cat News (54): 8–11.
  23. ^ Anwar, M.; Hasan, D.; Vattakavan, J. (2012). "Rusty-spotted cat in Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh State, India". Cat News (56): 12–13.
  24. ^ Vasava, A.; Bipin, C. M.; Solanki, R.; Singh, A. (2012). "Record of rusty-spotted cat from Kuno Wildlife Sanctuary, Madhya Pradesh, India". Cat News (57): 22–23.
  25. ^ Bender, U. (2011). International Register and Studbook for the Rusty-Spotted Cat Prionailurus rubiginosus phillipsi (Pocock, 1939) (PDF). Frankfurt: Frankfurt Zoo.
  26. ^ Bambaradeniya, C. N. B. (2006). "Prionailurus Severtzov, 1858". The Fauna of Sri Lanka: Status of Taxonomy, Research, and Conservation. Colombo: IUCN. p. 244. ISBN 9558177512.

External links

Black-footed cat

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Dang District, India

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Felinae

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Hurulu Forest Reserve of Sri Lanka was designated as a biosphere reserve in January 1977. The forest reserve is an important habitat of the Sri Lankan elephant. Hurulu forest reserve represents Sri Lanka dry-zone dry evergreen forests. There are many other protected areas situated around Hurulu Forest Reserve viz. Ritigala strict nature reserve, Minneriya-Girithale and Mahaweli flood plains nature reserves, Wasgamuwa National Park and Kahalla-Pallekele sanctuary. Carved out at the edge of the Hurulu Forest Reserve is the Hurulu Eco Park which offers jeep safaris.

Jambughoda Wildlife Sanctuary

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Kambalakonda Wildlife Sanctuary

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Kathiawar-Gir dry deciduous forests

The Kathiawar-Gir dry deciduous forests is a mostly arid ecoregion in northwestern India that stretches over 103,100 sq mi (267,000 km2) across Gujarat, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. The dry deciduous forests in the region are dominated by teak, and thorny trees and scrub in drier areas.

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the golden palm civet (P. zeylonensis)

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Shuklaphanta National Park

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The best time to visit is post-monsoon season till winter when the forests are lush green and streams are full.

Extant Carnivora species

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