Russian Space Command

Space Command (Russian: Космическое командование) was the part of the Russian Aerospace Defence Forces responsible for military space-related activities. It was formed on 1 December 2011 when the Russian Aerospace Defence Forces were created as a merger of the Russian Space Forces with part of the Russian Air Force. Responsibilities of the command included missile attack warning, space surveillance and the control of military satellites. The use of the term Space Command may be influenced by the United States Space Command.

Space Command was one of four components of the Aerospace Defence Forces, the others were Air and Missile Defence Command, Plesetsk Cosmodrome and the arsenal.[1][2] Subsumed under Space Command were three centres with their associated stations.[2][3][4]

Main Trial Centre for Testing and Control of Space Means named after G.S. Titov

One centre is the 153rd Main Trial Centre for Testing and Control of Space Means named after G.S. Titov. Located in Krasnoznamensk outside Moscow it is responsible for controlling Russia's military satellite constellation.[5] It is also responsible for the testing of new equipment and has a network of remote monitoring stations.[5]

Main Centre for Missile Attack Warning

The 820th Main Centre for Missile Attack Warning is the centre of Russia's missile attack warning network. It is located near Solnechnogorsk outside Moscow. Subsumed under it are a number of radar stations, with two, Gabala and Balkhash, located outside Russia.[6][7][8]

Main Space Surveillance Centre

The 821st Main Space Surveillance Centre is the centre of Russia's space surveillance network. It is located near Noginsk outside Moscow. Subsumed under it are several space surveillance only facilities such as Okno and Krona. It also gets data from the early warning radars.[8][9]

An article by United Russia said that Space Command would consist of the entirety of the Space Forces,[10] however as implemented Plesetsk Cosmodrome, formerly part of the Space Forces, was not under Space Command.[2]

References

  1. ^ Войска воздушно-космической обороны (in Russian). Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. n.d. Archived from the original on 17 February 2012. Retrieved 6 February 2012.
  2. ^ a b c "Structure". Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. n.d. Retrieved 6 February 2012.
  3. ^ Stukalin, Alexander (May 2012). "Russian Air and Space Defense Troops: Gaping Holes". Moscow Defense Brief. Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies. 2012 (2).
  4. ^ Marinin, I (2012). Войска воздушно-космической обороны. Novosti Kosmonavtiki (in Russian). Eastview (3): 8–9. ISSN 1561-1078.(subscription required)
  5. ^ a b A Kopik (c. 2003). "Космические войска" [Space Forces]. Novosti Kosmonavtiki. Archived from the original on 2009-02-01. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  6. ^ Podvig, Pavel (2002). "History and the Current Status of the Russian Early-Warning System" (PDF). Science and Global Security. 10: 21–60. doi:10.1080/08929880212328. ISSN 0892-9882. Archived from the original (pdf) on 2012-03-15.
  7. ^ Marinin, I (2011). Отечественной СПРН – 40 лет [Patriotic SPRN - 40 years]. Novosti Kosmonavtiki (in Russian). Eastview (339): 44–46. ISSN 1561-1078.(subscription required)
  8. ^ a b Podvig, Pavel (2012-04-12). "Early Warning". Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces. Retrieved 19 June 2012.
  9. ^ Denisov, Vitaliy (2007). "Russia's Great Power Status Said Boosted By Space Monitoring Effort". Red Orbit. Retrieved 2012-07-30.
  10. ^ "В составе ВКО России появится космическое командование" [Russia will have Space Command as a part of the VKO]. United Russia. 3 October 2011. Retrieved 2012-09-01.

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