Russia women's national football team

The Russia women's national football team represents Russia in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Football Union of Russia and affiliated with UEFA. Vera Pauw replaced Igor Shalimov as coach of the team in April 2011.

Russia qualified for two World Cups, 1999, 2003 and five European Championships, 1997, 2001, 2009, 2013 and 2017.

As the men's team, the Russian women's national team is the direct successor of the CIS and USSR women's national teams.

Russia
Shirt badge/Association crest
AssociationFootball Union of Russia
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachElena Fomina
CaptainKsenia Tsybutovich
Most capsSvetlana Petko (144)
Top scorerNatalia Barbashina (46)
Home stadiumRossiyanka
FIFA codeRUS
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 25 Steady (12 July 2019)[1]
Highest11 (July 2003)
Lowest27 (June 2018)
First international
Soviet Union Soviet Union 4–1 Bulgaria 
(Kazanlak, Bulgaria; 26 March 1990)
 Hungary 0–0 Russia 
(Budapest, Hungary; 17 May 1992)
Biggest win
 Russia 8–0 Kazakhstan 
(Krasnoarmeysk, Russia; 25 August 2010)
 Russia 8–0 Macedonia 
(Podolsk, Russia; 31 March 2012)
Biggest defeat
 Germany 9–0 Russia 
(Cottbus, Germany; 21 September 2013)
World Cup
Appearances2 (first in 1999)
Best resultQuarterfinal (1999, 2003)
European Championship
Appearances5 (first in 1997)
Best resultGroup Stage (1997, 2001, 2009, 2013, 2017)

History

Beginning

The USSR (who became the Commonwealth of Independent States during the campaign) reached the 1993 UEFA European Women's Championship quarter-finals at their only attempt and Russia were to match that two years later, with both teams losing to Germany over two legs. In 1997, they qualified directly for the final tournament but once there were defeated by Sweden, France – who they had beaten in the preliminaries – and Spain. However, they were among six European sides to qualify for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, thanks to two 2–1 play-off wins against Finland, and comfortable victories over Japan and Canada earned them a quarter-final, where they lost to eventual runners-up China.

After the turn of the 21st century

They cruised unbeaten into the 2001 continental finals but managed only a point against England in the group stage. Russia's fine qualifying run then continued in the 2003 World Cup and they again reached the quarter-finals before a 7–1 loss to Germany. That preceded something of a decline in fortunes as Finland avenged their 1999 reverse by beating Russia in the play-offs for UEFA WOMEN'S EURO 2005, before Russia had the misfortune to draw Germany in 2007 World Cup qualifying.

Present

Renewed hope soon began to come from the younger generation, however, with a young member of the 2003 squad, Elena Danilova, inspiring victory in the 2005 UEFA European Women's Under-19 Championship, their first post-Soviet national team title at any level. Although the striker has suffered injury problems, many of her colleagues have graduated to the senior squad, with Russia eventually reaching the 2009 finals with a dramatic away-goals play-off success against Scotland. At the final tournament, Russia were drawn against Sweden, Italy and England in Group C. The team was unable to get past the group stage and finished last as they lost all the three matches, scoring 2 and conceding 8.

In the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Qualifiers, Russia were drawn in Group 6 with Switzerland, Republic of Ireland, Israel and Kazakhstan, where Russia was eliminated in the group stage as they ended the stage behind Switzerland.

Kits

Russia's home kit consists of marron-red shirt, red shorts, and red-white socks. Their away kit consists of white jersey and light blue shorts and light-blue-white socks.

Record

World Cup

World Cup Finals
Year Round Pld W D* L GF GA GD
China 1991 Did not enter
Sweden 1995 Did not qualify
United States 1999 Quarter-finals 4 2 0 2 10 5 +5
United States 2003 Quarter-finals 4 2 0 2 6 9 −3
China 2007 Did not qualify
Germany 2011
Canada 2015
France 2019
Total 2/8 8 4 0 4 16 14 +2
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

European Championship

Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
1984 Did not qualify
Norway 1987
West Germany 1989
Denmark 1991
Italy 1993
Germany 1995
Norway Sweden 1997 Group stage 3 0 0 3 2 6
Germany 2001 Group stage 3 0 1 2 1 7
England 2005 Did not qualify
Finland 2009 Group stage 3 0 0 3 2 8
Sweden 2013 Group stage 3 0 2 1 3 5
Netherlands 2017 Group stage 3 1 0 2 2 5
Total 5/12 15 1 3 11 10 31

Invitational tournaments

Algarve Cup

Complete this table with details

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's soccer hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
Portugal 1994 Did not enter
Portugal 1995
Portugal 1996 5th 4 1 1 2 3 6
Portugal 1997 Did not enter
Portugal 1998
Portugal 1999
Portugal 2000
Portugal 2001
Portugal 2002
Portugal 2003
Portugal 2004
Portugal 2005
Portugal 2006
Portugal 2007
Portugal 2008
Portugal 2009
Portugal 2010
Portugal 2011
Portugal 2012
Portugal 2013
Portugal 2014 9th 4 2 0 2 7 6
Portugal 2015 Did not enter
Portugal 2016 6th 4 1 1 2 1 8
Portugal 2017 8th 4 1 0 3 3 12
Portugal 2018 12th 4 0 0 4 2 9
Total 5/25 20 5 2 13 16 41

Team

Current squad

The following players were called up for the 2018 Algarve Cup.[2]

Head coach: Elena Fomina

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Tatyana Shcherbak 22 October 1997 (age 21) 9 0 Russia Krasnodar
2 DF Anastasiya Akimova 12 May 1991 (age 28) 10 0 Russia Zvezda Perm
3 DF Anna Kozhnikova 10 July 1987 (age 32) 84 7 Russia Lokomotiv Moscow
4 DF Ekaterina Lazareva 25 March 1990 (age 29) 3 0 Belgium Anderlecht
5 MF Ekaterina Tyryshkina 31 January 1996 (age 23) 5 0 France Rodez
6 MF Alena Andreeva 21 November 1997 (age 21) 6 0 Russia Chertanovo Moscow
7 MF Irina Podshibyakina 5 July 1995 (age 24) 2 0 Russia Zvezda Perm
8 FW Valentina Zhukova 26 July 1992 (age 26) 2 0 Russia Yenisey
9 DF Maria Galay 14 October 1992 (age 26) 3 0 Russia Zvezda Perm
10 MF Nadezhda Smirnova 22 February 1996 (age 23) 17 6 Russia CSKA Moscow
11 FW Ekaterina Sochneva 12 August 1985 (age 33) 87 21 Russia CSKA Moscow
12 GK Elvira Todua 31 January 1986 (age 33) 80 0 Russia CSKA Moscow
13 DF Anna Belomyttseva 24 November 1996 (age 22) 12 1 Russia Lokomotiv Moscow
14 FW Nasiba Gasanova 15 December 1994 (age 24) 5 0 Russia Krasnodar
15 FW Elena Danilova 17 June 1987 (age 32) 34 12 Russia Ryazan
16 FW Marina Fedorova 10 May 1997 (age 22) 14 2 France FC Metz
17 FW Sofia Shishkina 30 September 1998 (age 20) 1 0 Russia Zvezda Perm
18 MF Elvira Ziyastinova 13 February 1991 (age 28) 27 0 Russia Lokomotiv Moscow
19 DF Nadezhda Koltakova 4 June 1992 (age 27) 5 0 Russia Ryazan VDV
20 MF Margarita Chernomyrdina 6 March 1996 (age 23) 25 2 Russia CSKA Moscow
21 GK Yulia Grichenko 10 March 1990 (age 29) 14 0 Russia Lokomotiv Moscow
22 DF Maria Alekseeva 23 October 1998 (age 20) 0 0 Russia Rossiyanka
23 MF Elena Morozova 15 March 1987 (age 32) 92 20 Russia Ryazan VDV

Managers

1989–1994 Soviet Union/Russia Oleg Lapshin
1994–2008 Russia Yuri Bystritsky
2008–2011 Russia Igor Shalimov
2011 Netherlands Vera Pauw
2011–2012 France Farid Benstiti
2012 Russia Vladimir Antonov
2012–2015 Russia Sergei Lavrentyev
2015–present Russia Elena Fomina

Recent schedule and results

2019

References

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  2. ^ "Сыграем на "Кубке Алгарве"" [We will play in the "Algarve Cup"] (in Russian). Russian Football Union. 22 February 2018.

External links

CSP Izmailovo

CSP Izmailovo (Russian: ЦСП Измайлово), formerly ShVSM Izmailovo, was a women's association football club based in Moscow, Russia. Founded in 2006, they began play in 2007 but folded in June 2014 during the Russian Women's Football Championship season.The team was coached by Sergey Lavrentyev from February 2011 until October 2012, when he took the job as Russia women's national football team coach.

Elena Denchtchik

Elena Denchtchik (born 11 November 1973) is a Russian women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Elena Jikhareva

Elena Jikhareva (born 8 July 1974) is a Russian footballer who played as a defender for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the UEFA Women's Euro 2001. On club level she played for Ryazan VDV in Russia.

Elena Lissacheva

Elena Lissacheva (born 25 November 1973) is a Russian footballer who played as a midfielder for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Galina Komarova

Galina Komarova (born 12 August 1977) is a Russian women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup and 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Igor Shalimov

Igor Mihailovich Shalimov (Russian: Игорь Михайлович Шалимов); born 2 February 1969) is a Russian football manager and a former midfielder. He primarily played as a wide midfielder.

Margarita Chernomyrdina

Margarita Alekseyevna Chernomyrdina (Russian: Маргарита Алексеевна Черномырдина; born 6 March 1996) is a Russian footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2016 Algarve Cup. At the club level, she has played for Chertanovo Moscow in Russia.

Marina Burakova

Marina Burakova (Russian: Марина Буракова; born 8 May 1966) is a Russian women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup and 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup where she was the team captain.

Natalia Filippova

Natalia Filippova (born 7 February 1975) is a Russian footballer who played as a defender for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup and the UEFA Women's Euro 2001.

Natalia Karasseva

Natalia Karasseva (born 30 April 1977) is a Russian footballer who played as a defender for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup and the UEFA Women's Euro 2001.

Oksana Shmachkova

Oksana Shmachkova (Russian: Оксана Шмачкова; born 20 June 1981 in Rayevskaya) is a Russian women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup as well as UEFA Women's Euro 2001 and 2009. On club level she plays for WFC Rossiyanka in Russia.

Olga Karasseva

Olga Karasseva (born 6 October 1975) is a Russian footballer who played as a forward for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup and UEFA Women's Euro 2001.

Russia women's national under-17 football team

The Russia women's national under-17 football team is the national under-17 football team of Russia and is governed by the Football Union of Russia.

Russia women's national under-19 football team

The Russian U-20 women's national football team is the national under-20 women's association football team of Russia. They are controlled by the Russian Football Union. They have the UEFA European Women's Under-19 Championship in 2005 defeating France on penalties.

Sergei Lavrentyev

Sergei Nikolayevich Lavrentyev (Russian: Серге́й Николаевич Лаврентьев; born 9 April 1972) is a Russian professional football coach and a former player. In 2010, he managed FC Nara-ShBFR Naro-Fominsk. As a player, he made his debut in the Soviet Second League in 1989 for FC Dynamo-2 Moscow.He played five games for German club FC Einheit 1990 Wernigerode in the 1992–93 NOFV-Oberliga Mitte.

Lavrentyev coached CSP Izmailovo of the Russian Women's Football Championship from February 2011 until October 2012, when he took the job as Russia women's national football team coach.

Tatiana Cheverda

Tatiana Cheverda (born 29 August 1974) is a Russian footballer who played as a defender for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Vera Pauw

Vera Pauw (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈveːraː pʌu]; born 18 January 1963) is a Dutch football coach and former player. She has managed several national women's football teams, including Scotland, Netherlands, Russia and South Africa.

Vera Stroukova

Vera Stroukova (born 6 August 1981) is a Russian women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Yulia Yushekivitch

Yulia Yushekivitch (born 14 September 1980) is a Russian footballer who played as a defender for the Russia women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
United States 1999 Group stage 20 June  Norway L 1–2 Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
23 June  Japan W 5–0 Civic Stadium, Portland
26 June  Canada W 4–1 Giants Stadium, East Rutherford
Quarter-finals 30 June  China PR L 0–2 Spartan Stadium, San Jose
United States 2003 Group stage 21 September  Australia W 2–1 The Home Depot Center, Carson
25 September  Ghana W 3–0
28 September  China PR L 0–1 PGE Park, Portland
Quarter-finals 2 October  Germany L 1–7
9 April 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierKazakhstan 0–3 RussiaAstana, Kazakhstan
16:00 (UTC+6) Report
Stadium: Astana Arena
Referee: Ivana Martinčić (Croatia)
8 June 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierRussia 1–3 EnglandMoscow, Russia
19:00 (UTC+3)
Report
Stadium: Sapsan Arena
Attendance: 2,000
Referee: Riem Hussein (Germany)
12 June 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierWales 3–0 RussiaNewport, Wales
19:00 (UTC+1)
Report Stadium: Newport Stadium
Referee: Lina Lehtovaara (Finland)
30 August 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierRussia 3–0 KazakhstanMoscow, Russia
18:00 (UTC+3)
Report Stadium: Sapsan Arena
Referee: Eleni Antoniou (Greece)
4 September 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierRussia 3–0 Bosnia and HerzegovinaMoscow, Russia
18:00 (UTC+3)
Report Stadium: Sapsan Arena
Referee: Tanja Subotič (Slovenia)
6 November 2018 FriendlySerbia 0–1 RussiaLazarevac, Serbia
14:00 (UTC+1) Report Chernomyrdina Goal 66' Stadium: SRC Kolubara
Attendance: 2,000
9 November 2018 FriendlySerbia 1–2 RussiaStara Pazova, Serbia
14:00 (UTC+1) Čanković Goal 34' (pen) Report
Stadium: Sportski centar FSS
4 April 2019 2019 Wuhan International Tournament SFChina PR 4–1 RussiaWuhan, China
19:35
Report
Stadium: Hankou Cultural Sports Centre
Referee: Park Se-jin (South Korea)
7 April 2019 2019 Wuhan International Tournament TPCroatia 0–3 RussiaWuhan, China
15:00 Report
Stadium: Hankou Cultural Sports Centre
Referee: Chang Xinxin (China)
Russia squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
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