Russ Crane

Vice Admiral Russell Harry Crane, AO, CSM (born 11 June 1954) is a retired senior officer of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), who served as the Chief of Navy from July 2008 until his retirement in June 2011.

Russ Crane
US Navy 090720-N-9950J-079 Royal Australian Navy Chief of Navy, Vice Adm. Russ Crane, Australian Army Lt. Gen. David Hurley and Capt. Brent Canady observe flight operations
Crane (right) with General David Hurley and Captain Brent Canady observing flight operations aboard the USS Essex (LHD-2) in 2009
Born11 June 1954 (age 65)
Southport, Queensland
AllegianceAustralia
Service/branchRoyal Australian Navy
Years of service1970–2011
RankVice Admiral
Commands heldChief of Navy (2008–11)
Deputy Chief of Navy (2006–08)
Joint Offshore Protection Command (2005–06)
HMAS Success (1998–00)
HMAS Derwent (1993–94)
HMAS Curlew (c. 1983–85)
Battles/warsInternational Force for East Timor
AwardsOfficer of the Order of Australia
Conspicuous Service Medal
Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States)
Meritorious Service Medal (Singapore)
Commander of the National Order of Merit (France)

Early life

Crane was born in Southport, Queensland, on 11 June 1954 to Harry and Nina Crane.[1] During his early teenage years, Crane was a cadet enlisted at the Naval Reserve Cadet unit "TS Tyalgum" at Main Beach on the Gold Coast.[2]

Naval career

Crane began his naval career as a junior recruit at HMAS Leeuwin in 1970.[3] Training as an Electrical Mechanic in aircraft communications, he was posted aboard the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne in 1971. Following selection for officer training in 1972, he began training as a Seaman Officer serving in numerous RAN establishments and ships, before receiving his commission.[4] He was appointed as Minehunting Control Officer in the minehunter HMAS Curlew, in 1978 and promoted to lieutenant during the same year. In 1983 he was promoted to lieutenant commander and appointed in command of Curlew. He was later appointed as the executive officer of the destroyer escort HMAS Torrens,[3] then in 1988, promoted to commander and posted to the Equipment Acquisition Division in Navy Office Canberra.

In 1993, Crane was posted as the commanding officer aboard HMAS Derwent, a destroyer escort based in Western Australia. He was promoted to captain in January 1996 and appointed as the Chief Staff Officer Command and Control, Communications and Intelligence in Maritime Headquarters. Captain Crane assumed command of HMAS Success on 24 November 1998. During his period in command Success conducted a number of deployments to the South East Asia region including, in September and October 1999, Operation Stabilise in support of peacekeeping operations in East Timor.

Awarded the Conspicuous Service Medal in early 2000 for his time in command HMAS Success,[5] Crane was promoted to commodore in March 2000 and posted to Australian Defence Headquarters in Canberra as the Director General Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Electronic Warfare. He was Commander Australian Navy Systems Command from October 2001 before being promoted to rear admiral on 1 May 2004 and assuming duties as Director General Coastwatch and the inaugural Commander of the newly formed Joint Offshore Protection Command in March 2005. Crane became the Deputy Chief of Navy in June 2006, and was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia in June 2007.[6]

Crane was promoted to vice admiral and succeeded Vice Admiral Russ Shalders as Chief of Navy on 4 July 2008.[7] For his "distinguished service as Deputy Chief of Navy and as Chief of Navy", Crane was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in the 2010 Australia Day Honours.[8] In February 2011, the RAN under Crane was embroiled in controversy when the Australian Defence Force was left with a critically reduced amphibious capability.[9] Analysts claimed that a critical naval capability had been allowed to deteriorate to the point of failure.[10]

On 24 May 2011, Crane was conferred Singapore's Meritorious Service Medal by Minister for Defence Ng Eng Hen at an investiture held at the Ministry of Defence.[11] Crane stood down as Chief of Navy and retired from the RAN on 7 June 2011.[12] For a number of personal reasons he specifically requested to retire on this date, nearly one month earlier than the intended 4 July Defence Chiefs change over, and five weeks prior to Crane's 41st anniversary of service with the RAN.[13] He was presented with the French National Order of Merit by Vice Admiral Stephane Verwaerde, Deputy Chief of the French Navy, on 17 May 2013.[14]

Honours and awards

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon

CSM Australia ribbon
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon
INTERFET Medal ribbon
DFSM with Fed Star

CSM Australia ribbon
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon
INTERFET Medal ribbon
DFSM with Fed Star

Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon
Pingat Jasa Gemilang (Tentera) ribbon
Ordre national du Merite Commandeur ribbon

Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon
Pingat Jasa Gemilang (Tentera) ribbon
Ordre national du Merite Commandeur ribbon
Order of Australia (Military) ribbon Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) Awarded January 2010[8]
Member of the Order of Australia (AM) Awarded June 2007[6]
CSM Australia ribbon Conspicuous Service Medal (CSM) Awarded June 2000[5]
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon Australian Active Service Medal[15] with "EAST TIMOR" clasp[15]
INTERFET Medal ribbon International Force East Timor Medal[15]
DFSM with Fed Star Defence Force Service Medal with 5 clasps/Federation Star[15] 40–44 years service
Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon Australian Defence Medal[15]
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States)
Pingat Jasa Gemilang (Tentera) ribbon Meritorious Service Medal (Singapore) – 24 May 2011
Ordre national du Merite Commandeur ribbon Commander of the National Order of Merit (France) – 17 May 2013[14]

References

  1. ^ "Vice Admiral Russell Harry Crane". Who's Who in Australia Online. ConnectWeb. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  2. ^ Band of Brothers Defence News, 2 October 2008
  3. ^ a b Chief of Navy Archived 13 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine, Official Navy bio
  4. ^ Russell Crane, Defence Leaders' bio
  5. ^ a b It's an honour – Conspicuous Service Medal – 12 June 2000
  6. ^ a b It's an honour – Member of the Order of Australia – 11 June 2007
  7. ^ New Defence leadership team announced
  8. ^ a b "Officer (AO) in the Military Division of the Order of Australia" (PDF). Australia Day 2010 Honours List. The Australian Honours Secretariat. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 February 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2010.
  9. ^ Mark Dodd Talk of bungle as military landing craft axed, 2 Feb 2011, The Australian
  10. ^ James Brown, Defence: Bad news and worse news, 1 Feb 2011, The Interpreter, www.lowyinterpreter.org
  11. ^ Pingat Jasa Gemilang (Tentera), MINDEF: Australian Navy Chief Receives Prestigious Military Award, 24 May 2011, MINDEF Singapore, http://www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/home.html
  12. ^ "Navy welcomes new Chief". Media Release. Department of Defence. Retrieved 7 June 2011.
  13. ^ "New Chiefs for the Australian Defence Force". Department of Defence. Archived from the original on 1 June 2011. Retrieved 2 June 2011.
  14. ^ a b http://www.ambafrance-au.org/Vice-Admiral-R-Crane-Commander-in
  15. ^ a b c d e Official High Resolution Photo

External links

Military offices
Preceded by
Vice Admiral Russ Shalders
Chief of Navy
2008–2011
Succeeded by
Vice Admiral Ray Griggs
Preceded by
Rear Admiral Max Hancock
Deputy Chief of Navy
2006–2008
Succeeded by
Rear Admiral Davyd Thomas
1927 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1927 Big Ten Conference football season was the 32nd season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1927 college football season.

The 1927 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Robert Zuppke, compiled a 7–0–1 record, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring defense (3.0 points allowed per game), and was recognized as the national champion under the Dickinson System rankings. Guard Russ Crane and center Robert Reitsch received first-team All-American honors.

The 1927 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Clarence Spears, compiled a 6–0–2 record, led the Big Ten in scoring offense (26.1 points per game), and was ranked No. 3 in the Dickinson System rankings. Fullback Herb Joesting was a consensus first-team All-American, and guard Harold Hanson also received first-team All-American honors from multiple selectors.

The 1927 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Elton Wieman, compiled a 6–2 record, shut out its first four opponents, and was ranked No. 7 in the Dickinson System rankings. Michigan end Bennie Oosterbaan was a consensus first-team All-American for the third consecutive year. Halfback Louis Gilbert was Michigan's leading scorer and a first-team All-Big Ten player.

Chicago center Ken Rouse received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference.

1927 College Football All-America Team

The 1927 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1927. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1927 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice with cooperation from ten coaches, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, selected based on consensus among UP newspapers throughout the country and prominent football coaches, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (7) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA).

1927 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1927 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois in the 1927 Big Ten Conference football season. The Fighting Illini compiled a 7–0–1 record (5–0 against Western Conference opponents) and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 152 to 24. The team was selected as the 1927 national champion by the Billingsley Report, Dickinson System, Helms Athletic Foundation, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.Though the team had no consensus All-Americans and was known for its lack of prominent names, center Robert Reitsch and guard Russ Crane made a handful of first-team selections. Reitsch was also the team captain.

1928 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1928 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1928 college football season. In their 16th season under head coach Robert Zuppke, the Illini compiled a 7–1 record and finished in first place in the Big Ten Conference. Tackle Albert J. Nowack was the team captain.

1929 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1929 Big Ten Conference football season was the 34th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1929 college football season.

The 1929 Purdue Boilermakers football team, under head coach Jimmy Phelan, compiled an 8–0 record, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (23.4 points per game), and was ranked No. 2 in the Dickinson System rankings. Fullback Ralph Welch and tackle Elmer Sleight were consensus first-team All-Americans.

The 1929 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Robert Zuppke, compiled a 6–1–1 record, finished in second place in the Big Ten, led the conference in scoring defense (3.4 points allowed per games), and was ranked No. 5 in the Dickinson System rankings.

The 1929 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Clarence Spears, compiled a 6–2 and finished in third place in the Big Ten. Tackle Bronko Nagurski was selected as the team's most valuable player and a consensus first-team All-American.

Iowa halfback Willis Glassgow won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the Big Ten. He was also selected as a first-team All-American by Collier's Weekly, the Newspaper Enterprise Association, and the New York Sun.

1929 College Football All-America Team

The 1929 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1929. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1929 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (7) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA).

1929 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1929 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1929 college football season. In their 17th season under head coach Robert Zuppke, the Illini compiled a 6–1–1 record and finished in second place in the Big Ten Conference. Guard Russ Crane was the team captain.

Chief of Navy (Australia)

The Chief of Navy is the most senior appointment in the Royal Australian Navy, responsible to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) and the Secretary of Defence. The rank associated with the position is vice admiral (3-star).

Vice Admiral Michael Noonan is the current chief of navy; he assumed the position on 06 July 2018.

Davyd Thomas

Rear Admiral Davyd Rhys Thomas (born 2 May 1956) is a senior officer in the Royal Australian Naval Reserve.

Deputy Chief of Navy (Australia)

The Deputy Chief of Navy (DCN) is the second most senior appointment in the Royal Australian Navy, responsible to the Chief of Navy (CN). The rank associated with the position is rear admiral (2-star).

Disruptive Pattern Camouflage Uniform

Disruptive Pattern Camouflage Uniform (DPCU), also nicknamed Auscam or jelly bean camo is a five-colour military camouflage pattern used by the Australian Defence Force. It was developed and tested during the late 1970s and early 1980s.

The DPCU is being phased out by the Australian Army in favor of the Australian Multicam Camouflage Uniform (AMCU), which uses an Australian-designed multi-camouflage pattern based on the US and British MultiCam.

Kurtwood Smith

Kurtwood Larson Smith (born July 3, 1943) is an American television and film actor. He is known for playing Clarence Boddicker in RoboCop (1987) and Red Forman in That '70s Show, as well as for his many appearances in science fiction films and television programs (Star Trek, The X-Files). He also starred in the seventh season of 24.

Maritime Border Command (Australia)

The Maritime Border Command (MBC) is the principal civil maritime security authority and de facto coast guard of Australia. It is a multi-agency command within the Department of Home Affairs comprising both Australian Border Force and Australian Defence Force personnel led by a Royal Australian Navy rear admiral.The command was established in 2005 and originally named the Joint Offshore Protection Command. In October 2006 it was renamed to Border Protection Command and was again retitled to its current name in July 2015 to coincide with the establishment of the Australian Border Force.

Nigel Coates (admiral)

Rear Admiral Nigel Stephen Coates, (8 March 1959 – 2 June 2010) was a senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy.

Quick Change

Quick Change is a 1990 American crime comedy film written by Howard Franklin, produced by and starring Bill Murray, and co-directed by both. Geena Davis, Randy Quaid, Jason Robards, Tony Shalhoub, Stanley Tucci, Phil Hartman, Victor Argo, Kurtwood Smith, Bob Elliott and Philip Bosco all co-star. It is based on a book of the same name by Jay Cronley. The film is a remake of the 1985 French film Hold-Up starring Jean-Paul Belmondo. The film is set in New York City, particularly in Manhattan and Queens, with scenes taking place on the New York City Subway and within John F. Kennedy International Airport. Times Square, the Empire State Building, and the Statue of Liberty are also briefly seen. As of 2019, Quick Change is the only directorial credit of Bill Murray's career.

Ray Griggs

Vice Admiral Raymond James Griggs, (born July 1961) is a former senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy. He served as Chief of Navy from June 2011 to June 2014, before being appointed Vice Chief of the Defence Force until his retirement in July 2018.

Russ Crane (American football)

Russell J. Crane was an American college football player and coach and boxer. He was a prominent guard for coach Robert Zuppke's Illinois Fighting Illini, captain in 1929.Crane was an assistant football coach at the University of Richmond from 1935 to 1938. He turned to Richmond as line coach and head track coach in 1946.

Southport State High School

Southport State High School is a secondary school situated in Southport on the Gold Coast, Queensland in Australia. Southport State High School was the first public high school on the Gold Coast, celebrating its 100th Centenary in 2016. 'Respice Finem' remains the school motto to this day, meaning 'to look to the end result'. Some of the Southport State High School Buildings are listed on the Queensland Heritage Register.

Vice admiral (Australia)

Vice admiral (abbreviated as VADM) is the second-highest active rank of the Royal Australian Navy and was created as a direct equivalent of the British rank of vice admiral. It is a three-star rank. The rank is held by the Chief of Navy and, when the positions are held by navy officers, by the Vice Chief of the Defence Force, the Chief of Joint Operations, or the Chief Capability Development Group.

Vice admiral is a higher rank than rear admiral, but lower than admiral. Vice admiral is the equivalent of air marshal in the Royal Australian Air Force and lieutenant general in the Australian Army.

Since the mid-1990s, the insignia of a Royal Australian Navy vice admiral is the Crown of St. Edward above a crossed sabre and baton, above three silver stars, above the word "AUSTRALIA". The stars have eight points as in the equivalent Royal Navy insignia. Prior to 1995, the RAN shoulder board was identical to the UK shoulder board. (The UK shoulder board changed in 2001.)

Director,
Commonwealth Naval Forces
First Naval Members,
Australian Commonwealth Naval Board
Chiefs of the Naval Staff
Chiefs of Navy

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