Russ Bogda

Russell W. Bogda (October 15, 1911 – February 22, 1958) was an American automotive dealer and executive officer of the Green Bay Packers. From 1953 to 1957, he served as the sixth president of Green Bay Packers, Inc., the non-profit organization that owns the Packers. During his presidency, the Packers secured funding and built New City Stadium, which would be renamed in 1965 to Lambeau Field. Although the Packers under Bogda saw little on-field success, the construction of a new stadium helped the organization stay financially competitive and remain in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Bogda died at the age of 46 on February 22, 1958 of lung cancer.

Russ Bogda
Portrait photo of Russ Bogda wearing a suit and tie
Bogda circa the 1950s
Born
Russell W. Bogda

October 15, 1911
DiedFebruary 22, 1958 (aged 46)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationAutomotive dealer
Known forPresident, Green Bay Packers
Spouse(s)Yes
Children2

Early life

Russell Bogda was born on October 15, 1911, in Burnett, Wisconsin. His family moved to Green Bay, Wisconsin in 1925. He attended Marquette University.[1]

Automotive business

Bogda was a Green Bay businessman who served in various roles, including as president, for the Bogda Motor Company. He also was on the national planning council of the Chevrolet division of General Motors for two years and was the former president of the Chevrolet Dealers Association of Wisconsin.[1]

Green Bay Packers

Bogda was elected to the Packers board of directors in 1946.[1] He was then elected president in 1953 after Emil R. Fischer—the Packers fifth president—retired to become chairman of the board.[2] He served as president for five years from 1953 to 1957.[1] The Packers had little on-field success under Bogda, with 1955 being the only season the team did not have a losing record.[3] During his tenure, Bogda oversaw a large reorganization of the team's administration, increased the financial security of the organization, and assisted with the introduction of television within football. However, Bogda's primary contribution during his tenure was securing funding and constructing a new stadium for the team.[4]

The Packers had been playing at City Stadium since 1925, but by the 1950s the facility was considered by the National Football League (NFL) to be inadequate.[5] There were discussions from league officials about forcing the Packers to move to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where a better stadium was available, or even for the team to be moved out-of-state.[6] However, Bogda, the Packers' board of directors, and prominent civic leaders advocated for a public referendum[5][7] on a city-led bond issuance to finance a 32,000 seat stadium at a cost of about $1,000,000.[8][9][10] The stadium, which was originally called New City Stadium, was the first facility designed and built solely for an NFL franchise.[11] The stadium was opened in 1957 with Bogda in attendance for the dedication ceremonies.[1] After being reelected in March,[12] Bogda attempted to resign his position in December 1957 due to poor health. The Board initially declined to accept his resignation,[13] but finally relented after naming Dominic Olejniczak as acting president.[14] Olejniczak was ultimately elected as the next president of the Packers.[15][16] In 1965, after the death of Curly Lambeau, New City Stadium was renamed to Lambeau Field.[17][18] As of 2019, the Packers still play at Lambeau Field, which has been expanded at least nine times to increase the stadium's capacity to over 81,000 seats.[19][20] Even though the Packers saw little success on the field during his tenure as president, Bogda was praised for his hard work, support of the team, and success in keeping the Packers in Green Bay.[21]

Personal life

Bogda was married once and had two children: Russell Jr. and Julie Lynn.[1] He was diagnosed with lung cancer and was ill for over a year.[22] He died at the age of 46 on February 22, 1958.[23]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Green Bay Prexy, Russ Bogda, Dies Of Lung Cancer". Democrat and Chronicle. Associated Press. February 24, 1958. Archived from the original on December 16, 2018. Retrieved December 16, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  2. ^ "Packers' Profit $12,000—Name Russ Bogda Prexy Bogda". Green Bay Press-Gazette. February 3, 1953. p. 13. Archived from the original on January 28, 2019. Retrieved January 28, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  3. ^ "Green Bay Packers Team Encyclopedia". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on November 20, 2018. Retrieved December 17, 2018.
  4. ^ Daley, Art (February 25, 1958). "Russ Hoped To Change Packer Luck on Field". Green Bay Press-Gazette. p. 17. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  5. ^ a b "Green Bay Votes 'Yes' On Stadium Bond Issue". La Crosse Tribune. Associated Press. April 4, 1956. p. 22. Archived from the original on January 28, 2019. Retrieved January 28, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  6. ^ "New grid stadium planned by Packers". Milwaukee Journal. United Press. August 25, 1955. p. 18. Archived from the original on May 27, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2019 – via Google News Archive open access.
  7. ^ Daley, Art (March 20, 1956). "Pamphlets Push New Stadium, Yes Vote!". Green Bay Press-Gazette. p. 21. Archived from the original on February 26, 2019. Retrieved February 26, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  8. ^ "Stadium Completed on Time Despite Difficulty". Green Bay Press-Gazette. December 31, 1957. p. 7. Archived from the original on January 5, 2019. Retrieved January 5, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  9. ^ Bartelt, Jim (December 22, 1955). "Packers Submit New Stadium Plan to City Council". Green Bay Press-Gazette. p. 17. Archived from the original on January 29, 2019. Retrieved January 29, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  10. ^ Bartelt, Jim (January 18, 1955). "Order Architect, Cost on Steel Stands". Green Bay Press-Gazette. p. 19. Archived from the original on January 29, 2019. Retrieved January 29, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  11. ^ Wood, Ryan (September 29, 2017). "How Lambeau Field saved the Packers in Green Bay". Gannett. Archived from the original on January 28, 2019. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  12. ^ "Bogda Renamed President of Packers Corp". Green Bay Press-Gazette. March 18, 1957. p. 2. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved January 5, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  13. ^ "Packers' Bogda Quits". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Associated Press. December 27, 1957. p. 27. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved January 5, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  14. ^ "Bogda, Packers' President, Quits". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Associated Press. December 18, 1957. p. 1. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved January 5, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  15. ^ Daley, Art (May 7, 1958). "Young Blood Dominates Packer Body". Green Bay Press-Gazette. p. 25. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  16. ^ Daley, Art (April 28, 1958). "Packers Battle for Power Set Tonight". Green Bay Press-Gazette. p. 21. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  17. ^ "Packer board backs Lambeau Field idea". Milwaukee Journal. United Press. August 3, 1965. p. 18. Archived from the original on October 30, 2015 – via Google News Archive open access.
  18. ^ "'Lambeau Field' voted by council". Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. August 5, 1965. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 10, 2016 – via Google News Archive open access.
  19. ^ "Lambeau Field". Green Bay Packers, Inc. Archived from the original on December 11, 2018. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  20. ^ "A brief history of Lambeau Field renovations". In Business. August 2013. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original on May 1, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  21. ^ "Bogda Is Lauded for Work With Packers". Green Bay Press-Gazette. February 24, 1958. p. 2. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  22. ^ "Cancer Fatal To President Of Packers". Asheville Citizen-Times. Associated Press. February 24, 1958. p. 11. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  23. ^ "Russ Bogda Dies". News-Record. Associated Press. February 24, 1958. p. 7. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access.

External links

Burnett, Wisconsin

Burnett is a town in Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 919 at the 2000 census. The census-designated place of Burnett is located in the town, and the unincorporated community of Rolling Prairie is located partially in the town.

Dominic Olejniczak

Dominic Olejniczak (August 18, 1908 – April 16, 1989) was the mayor of Green Bay, Wisconsin and the president and chairman of the Board of the Green Bay Packers.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.