Russ Ball

Russ Ball is the Executive Vice President/ Director of Football Operations of the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League.

Biography

Born in Moberly, Missouri, Ball is a graduate of the University of Central Missouri and the University of Missouri.[1] He is married to Diana and has two children.

Career

During college, Ball played center with the Central Missouri Mules football team. Later Ball served as Head Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Missouri Tigers football team from 1982 to 1989. From there he spent ten seasons with the National Football League's Kansas City Chiefs, first serving as Assistant Strength and Condition Coach, and later as Administrative Assistant to the head coach. In 1999, he became Senior Football Administrator of the Minnesota Vikings. He became Director of Football Administration of the Washington Redskins in 2001. From 2002 to 2007 he worked with the New Orleans Saints, first as Senior Football Administrator, later as Vice President of Football Administration. He was named to his position with the Packers on February 13, 2008.

References

  1. ^ http://www.packers.com/team/staff/russ-ball/b42d75d1-310e-4916-9f4e-7567ed7712e0/
1989 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1989 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League, the 30th overall and the first under head coach Marty Schottenheimer and general manager Carl Peterson. They improved on their 4-11-1 record from 1988 and finished with an 8-7-1 record.

The Chiefs did not qualify for the playoffs in for the third straight year but did send four players to the Pro Bowl.

1990 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1990 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 21st season in the National Football League, the 38th as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 31st overall. they improved from an 8-7-1 record to an 11–5 record and Wild Card spot in the 1991 playoffs. In Marty Schottenheimer's first playoff appearance with the Chiefs, they lost to the Miami Dolphins 17–16 in the Wild Card round. Starting with the home opener, the Chiefs began an NFL-record 18-straight seasons with every home game sold out. The streak was finally broken in the final home game of the 2009 Kansas City Chiefs season versus Cleveland.

1991 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1991 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 22nd season in the National Football League and 32nd overall. They failed to improve on their 11–5 record from 1990 and finished with a 10–6 record. The Chiefs passing game wasn't as good as their 1990 campaign as Steve DeBerg’s consistency dropped. The running game made up for lost time as Christian Okoye ran for 1,031 yards for the season, and Barry Word was productive, and rookie Harvey Williams was outstanding in limited playing time. The Chiefs defeated their division rival, the Los Angeles Raiders in the Wild Card round, resulting in the franchise's first playoff victory since Super Bowl IV in 1970. The next week, the Chiefs lost to the Buffalo Bills in the divisional playoffs.

The season began on July 27 when Jan Stenerud, the hero of Super Bowl IV was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

But the Chiefs rebounded to win 4 straight games, including an October 7 game in which the Chiefs trounced the Buffalo Bills 33–6. It was the Chiefs' first home Monday Night Football game since 1983 and on October 13, The Chiefs blasted the Miami Dolphins 42–7 as Christian Okoye ran for 153 yards.

The Chiefs continued to play playoff football and on December 22 Christmas came early for the Chiefs and their fans. By playing brilliantly and holding off the Raiders, in the end, they left Los Angeles with a 27–21 win. The victory gave the Chiefs a home playoff game against the Raiders. A loss would have meant playing in Los Angeles again the following week. It was the first playoff game in Kansas City in 20 years.

The offense was superb as quarterback Steve DeBerg completed 14 of 20 passes for 227 yards and 2 touchdowns. Barry Word rushed for 152 yards, and J. J. Birden caught 8 passes for 188 yards and 2 touchdowns. Even more impressive was that the Chiefs didn’t have to punt in the game and held the ball for almost 40 minutes.

1992 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1992 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 23rd season in the National Football League and the 33rd overall. The Chiefs matched their 10–6 record from 1991, but were shut out by the San Diego Chargers 17–0 in the Wild Card round.

During the season; the Chiefs wore a “WWD” patch on their jerseys in tribute to vice president of player personnel Whitey Dovell, who died in May 1992.

1993 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1993 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 24th season in the National Football League and the 34th overall. They improved on their 10-6 record from 1992 and won the AFC West and with an 11-5 record. Kansas City advanced all the way to the AFC Championship before losing to the Buffalo Bills 30–13, which started the Chiefs' NFL record 8 game playoff losing streak. It would be 22 years before the Chiefs would win another playoff game.The season marked the first for new quarterback Joe Montana, who was acquired through a trade with the San Francisco 49ers and running back Marcus Allen from the Los Angeles Raiders, both winners of five Super Bowl championships combined. This would be the last time until 2018 that the Chiefs would appear in the AFC Championship game or win a home playoff game.

1994 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1994 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 25th season in the National Football League, the 32nd as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 35th overall. They failed to improve their 11-5 record from 1993 and finishing with a 9–7 record and Wild Card spot in the 1994–95 playoffs. The Chiefs lost to the Miami Dolphins 27–17 in the Wild Card round. Alongside celebrating the NFL's 75th anniversary season. Future Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana retired following the season.

1995 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1995 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 26th season in the National Football League, the 33rd as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 36th overall. The team improved on their 9-7 from 1994 and finished the regular season with a 13–3 record and the AFC West division championship, However, the Chiefs suffered a detrimental loss in the 1995-96 AFC playoffs when Placekicker Lin Elliott missed three crucial field goals, which gave the Indianapolis Colts an upset win.

1996 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1996 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League, and the 37th overall. Following the Chiefs' devastating loss to the colts in the playoffs the year before, the Chiefs failed to improve their 13-3 record from 1995 and finishing 9–7 record and second-place finish in the AFC West. Despite having the team being predicted as one of the eventual winners of Super Bowl XXXI by Sports Illustrated, the team missed the playoffs for the first time since 1989.

1997 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1997 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 28th season in the National Football League, and the 38th overall.

The Chiefs finished with a 13–3 record and as AFC West division champions. The season is best remembered for the Rich Gannon–Elvis Grbac quarterback controversy which brewed throughout the entire season and arguably cost the Chiefs a victory in the playoffs. The Chiefs were beaten by division rival and eventual Super Bowl champions, the Denver Broncos, in the 1998 playoffs. 1997 was the final season that the Chiefs would appear in the playoffs during the 1990s and for the next several seasons, they fell out of contention. They would return to the playoffs in 2003.

This was the last season that Marty Schottenheimer would coach the team into the playoffs, with the loss to Denver in the Divisional round 14-10 capping off many years of disappointing playoff losses. This was also the final season for future Hall of Fame running back Marcus Allen.

1998 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1998 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 39th season in the National Football League, and the 29th overall.

The season began with the team hoping to avenge the loss in the 1998 playoffs to the eventual Super Bowl champion Denver Broncos, but instead the Chiefs failed to succeed in the highly competitive AFC West.

The team finished with a 7–9 record and 4th place in the AFC West. Head coach Marty Schottenheimer announced his resignation following the season after ten seasons with the team and defensive coordinator Gunther Cunningham assumed coaching duties for 1999.

2002 New Orleans Saints season

The 2002 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 36th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They improved upon their previous season's performance of 7–9, winning nine games. Despite the winning season, and ranking third in total offense in 2002, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs. A bright moment during the season for the Saints was sweeping eventual champion Tampa Bay. The 2 wins were almost guaranteed to make New Orleans a playoff team. However, 3 consecutive losses, including one to 1-13 Cincinnati, knocked New Orleans out of playoff contention.

2003 New Orleans Saints season

The 2003 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League and the 28th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. They failed to improve on their 9-7 record from 2002 and finished with a record of 8–8. This was the season of the River City Relay, a play that has gone down in NFL lore from a week 16 game against the Jacksonville Jaguars. The Saints were 7-7 and needed a victory to keep their postseason hopes alive. The Jaguars held a 20–13 lead with seven seconds left in regulation, and the Saints had possession on their own 25. In a scene evoking memories of The Play, Aaron Brooks passed to Donté Stallworth for 42 yards, Stallworth lateraled to Michael Lewis for 7 yards, Lewis lateraled to Deuce McAllister for 5 yards, and McAllister lateraled to Jerome Pathon for 21 yards and a touchdown. The score was 20–19, leaving only the extra point to force overtime. However, in an unlikely twist, John Carney, who in his career made 98.4% of extra points attempted and had not missed one in a full decade, inexplicably missed the kick wide right, causing the Saints to miss the playoffs for the third straight season.

2004 New Orleans Saints season

The 2004 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 38th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They matched their previous season's output of 8–8, and the team finished the season on a four-game winning streak, which was all the more remarkable because the Saints trailed at some point during every game. The 1978 Atlanta Falcons and the 2002 Cleveland Browns come closest to this record, winning eight games out of fifteen where they trailed at some point.

2005 New Orleans Saints season

The 2005 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 39th season in the National Football League.

The season began with the team trying to improve from their 8–8 record from 2004. The Saints played two preseason games in the Louisiana Superdome before being forced to evacuate New Orleans due to Hurricane Katrina.

They were forced to play the rest of the season on the road, splitting their games between their temporary headquarters at San Antonio’s Alamodome, and LSU’s Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, and even playing their first home game at Giants Stadium.

The season ended with a 3–13 record, their equal-worst record alongside 1996 and 1999 since their 1–15 1980 season, and the firing of Jim Haslett. He was replaced by current head coach Sean Payton the following 2006 season.

2016 Green Bay Packers season

The 2016 Green Bay Packers season was their 98th season overall, 96th season in the National Football League, and the 11th under head coach Mike McCarthy. Despite a 4-6 start to the season, the Packers went on a 6-game winning streak to finish the regular season with a 10–6 record. The team clinched the NFC North for the fifth time in six years with their week 17 win over the Detroit Lions. They routed the fifth-seeded New York Giants 38–13 in the wild card round of the playoffs and upset the top-seeded Dallas Cowboys 34–31 in the divisional round of the playoffs, but their season came to an end when they were beat by the second-seeded Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Championship Game 44–21.

2019 Green Bay Packers season

The 2019 season will be the Green Bay Packers' upcoming 99th season in the National Football League, their 101st overall and their first under new head coach Matt LaFleur. After suffering back-to-back losing seasons in for the first time since 1990–91 and missing the playoffs back-to-back seasons for the first time since 2005–06, the Packers will look to improve on their 6–9–1 record from last year, and attempt to return to the playoffs for the first time since 2016.

Green Bay Packers

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The Packers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. It is the third-oldest franchise in the NFL, dating back to 1919, and is the only non-profit, community-owned major league professional sports team based in the United States. Home games have been played at Lambeau Field since 1957.

The Packers are the last of the "small town teams" which were common in the NFL during the league's early days of the 1920s and '30s. Founded in 1919 by Earl "Curly" Lambeau and George Whitney Calhoun, the franchise traces its lineage to other semi-professional teams in Green Bay dating back to 1896. Between 1919 and 1920, the Packers competed against other semi-pro clubs from around Wisconsin and the Midwest, before joining the American Professional Football Association (APFA), the forerunner of today's NFL, in 1921. Although Green Bay is by far the smallest major league professional sports market in North America, Forbes ranked the Packers as the world's 26th most valuable sports franchise in 2016, with a value of $2.35 billion.The Packers have won 13 league championships, the most in NFL history, with nine pre–Super Bowl NFL titles and four Super Bowl victories. The Packers won the first two Super Bowls in 1967 and 1968 and were the only NFL team to defeat the American Football League (AFL) prior to the AFL–NFL merger. The Vince Lombardi Trophy is named after the Packers' coach of the same name, who guided them to their first two Super Bowls. Their two subsequent Super Bowl wins came in 1996 and 2010.The Packers are long-standing adversaries of the Chicago Bears, Minnesota Vikings, and Detroit Lions, who today comprise the NFL's NFC North division, and were formerly members of the NFC Central Division. They have played over 100 games against each of those teams through history, and have a winning overall record against all of them, a distinction only shared with the Kansas City Chiefs and Dallas Cowboys. The Bears–Packers rivalry is one of the oldest in NFL history, dating back to 1921.

List of University of Central Missouri people

The following is a list of notable people associated with the University of Central Missouri, located in the American city of Warrensburg, Missouri.

Moberly, Missouri

Moberly is a city in Randolph County, Missouri, United States. The population was 13,974 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Columbia, Missouri metropolitan area.

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