Rueben Mayes

Rueben Mayes (born June 6, 1963) is a former American football running back from Canada who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) from 1986 to 1993. He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame for his contributions while playing for the Washington State Cougars football team.

Rueben Mayes
No. 36
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:June 6, 1963 (age 55)
North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada
Career information
College:Washington State
NFL Draft:1986 / Round: 3 / Pick: 57
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:3,484
Yards per carry:4.0
Rushing touchdowns:23
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life and high school

He first gained notoriety as a running back at North Battleford Comprehensive High School in North Battleford, Saskatchewan. In 1980 Mayes led the NBCHS Vikings to an undefeated season and the SHSAA 3A Provincial Football championship. In 1981, he set a provincial record in the 100 metre race at the SHSAA provincial track and field championship that still stands.

College career

Mayes played for the Washington State University Cougars, where he was recognized as a consensus All-American and finished tenth in the Heisman Trophy race. Mayes set single-season and career-rushing records (1,632; 3,519 yards) with the Cougars, and established an NCAA record for most rushing yards in one game (357 vs. Oregon in 1984). That was the Pacific-10 Conference record until being broken by Ka'Deem Carey in 2012.

In 1995, a panel of experts commissioned by The Spokesman-Review named Mayes to the all-time WSU team. The honor was repeated in 1998 by Cougfan.com when it picked its list of the school's all-time greatest players. On May 1, 2008 he was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame. In August 2017, a group of panelists commissioned by the Pac-12 Network picked the 12 greatest Washington State players [1] of all time and Mayes ranked No. 1.

Professional career

He was drafted in the third round of the 1986 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints. He proceeded to win the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year Award that year from the Associated Press. Although his NFL career was hampered by injuries, he was named to the Pro Bowl twice. Mayes played five seasons with the Saints before being traded to the Seattle Seahawks for the final two years of his career.

Later life

After football, Mayes became active in efforts to better educate at-risk youth. He would later earn a master's degree and return to Washington State University as an administrator. As of November 2018, he is Chief Development Officer at Pullman Regional Hospital in Pullman, Washington [2]. His son Logan was a three-star recruited linebacker at Marist Catholic High School in Eugene Oregon. He committed to play at Washington State University, following his father's footsteps.[3] Rueben is one of the only five Saskatchewan natives to make it to the NFL, the other four being Arnie Weinmeister, Jon Ryan, Ben Heenan and Brett Jones. Mayes was the subject of a 1989 documentary film, The Saint from North Battleford, directed by Selwyn Jacob.[4]

Statistics

Year Team GP Att Yds Avg Long Rush TD Rec Yds Avg Long Rec TD
1986 New Orleans Saints 16 286 1353 4.7 50 8 17 96 5.6 18 0
1987 New Orleans Saints 12 243 917 3.8 38 5 15 68 4.5 16 0
1988 New Orleans Saints 16 170 628 3.7 21 3 11 103 9.4 25 0
1990 New Orleans Saints 15 138 510 3.7 18 7 12 121 10.1 66 0
1991 New Orleans Saints 0 - - - - - - - - - -
1992 Seattle Seahawks 16 28 74 2.6 14 0 2 13 6.5 7 0
1993 Seattle Seahawks 1 1 2 2.0 2 0 - - - - -
Career Totals 76 866 3484 4.0 50 23 57 401 7.0 66 0
  • Stats that are highlighted show career high

References

  1. ^ "Pac-12 Network unveils picks for 12 greatest Washington State football players of all time". 247sports.com. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  2. ^ https://pullmanregional.org/how-to-help/foundation. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ "Future Coug Mayes Stands Alone". Scout.com. Archived from the original on December 27, 2010. Retrieved January 12, 2011.
  4. ^ McRae, Ricardo (January 19, 2011). "Selwyn Jacob". Who's Who in Black Canada. Archived from the original on February 27, 2014. Retrieved February 21, 2014.

External links

1984 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1984 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1984 college football season.

1984 Washington State Cougars football team

The 1984 Washington State Cougars football team was an American football team that represented Washington State University in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) during the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their seventh season under head coach Jim Walden, the Cougars compiled a 6–5 record (4–3 against Pac-10 opponents), finished in fifth place in the Pac-10, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 319 to 317.The team's statistical leaders included Mark Rypien with 1,927 passing yards, Rueben Mayes with 1,637 rushing yards, and John Marshall with 534 receiving yards.

1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific 10 Conference teams for the 1985 college football season.

1985 Washington State Cougars football team

The 1985 Washington State Cougars football team was an American football team that represented Washington State University in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) during the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their eighth season under head coach Jim Walden, the Cougars compiled a 4–7 record (3–5 against Pac-10 opponents), finished in a tie for seventh place in the Pac-10, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 313 to 282.The team's statistical leaders included Mark Rypien with 2,174 passing yards, Rueben Mayes with 1,236 rushing yards, and Kitrick Taylor with 489 receiving yards.

1986 CFL Draft

The 1986 CFL Draft composed of eight rounds where 72 Canadian football players were chosen from eligible Canadian universities and Canadian players playing in the NCAA.

1989 Indiana Hoosiers football team

The 1989 Indiana Hoosiers football team represented the Indiana Hoosiers in the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. They participated as members of the Big Ten Conference. The Hoosiers played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington, Indiana. The team was coached by Bill Mallory, in his sixth year as head coach of the Hoosiers.

In the battle for the Old Oaken Bucket, Purdue beat Indiana.

1989 New Orleans Saints season

The 1989 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 23rd season in the National Football League, and the 14th with home games at the Superdome. They failed to impove their 10-6 record from 1988 and instead finshing at 9-7, missing the playoffs for the second straight year.

1992 Seattle Seahawks season

The 1992 Seattle Seahawks season was the team's 17th season with the National Football League. The 1992 season was the first of three seasons in Seattle for head coach Tom Flores. The Seahawks' 0.125 winning percentage in 1992 remains the worst in franchise history.

The Seahawks' 140 points (8.8 points per game) scored in the regular season is the lowest total for any team playing a 16-game season. For comparison, the 2008 Detroit Lions, who went winless, scored 268 points, nearly double. Long-time quarterback Dave Krieg had left Seattle for the rival Kansas City Chiefs in the offseason, leaving Seattle with Kelly Stouffer, Stan Gelbaugh and Dan McGwire (brother of Major League Baseball star Mark McGwire) as their three quarterbacks.

Football Outsiders calls Seattle's 1992 offense "the worst offense in (their ranking system's) history." Seattle's 1,778 passing yards are the fewest in a season by any team during the 1990s. Seattle was so inept that from the first game of the season until their Week 13 overtime win over Denver, they collectively had fewer points scored than punts attempted; for the entire season, the team finished with only slightly more points than punts. The team failed to score more than 17 points in a single game.

Despite their historically inept offense, Football Outsiders also ranked Seattle as having the third-best defense in 1992, making them the most imbalanced team ever measured. The Seahawks' star defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy was named the 1992 NFL Defensive Player of the Year. Seattle gave up the fourth-fewest passing yards (2,661), and tied for fewest passing touchdowns allowed (11) of any team in 1992.

Before Seattle's Monday Night Football victory over Denver in the Kingdome the Seahawks honored Pete Gross inducting him as the first member of the Ring of Honor. Gross would die two days later after his long bout with cancer. That game would also be the last MNF game played in the Kingdome and the last in Seattle until 2002 (the Seahawks themselves didn't appear on MNF again until Mike Holmgren's return to Green Bay in 1999).

Arnie Weinmeister

Arnold George Weinmeister (March 23, 1923 – June 29, 2000) was a Canadian-born American and Canadian football defensive tackle. He went to four Pro Bowls, but with only a six-year tenure in the All-America Football Conference and National Football League combined, his career is one of the shortest of any Pro Football Hall of Fame member. He was born in Rhein, Saskatchewan.

Barry Word

Barry Quentin Word (born July 17, 1964) is a former American football running back for the National Football League.

Jim Skipper

Jim Skipper (born January 23, 1949) is an American football coach who was the running backs coach for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL).

Junior Tautalatasi

Taivale "Junior" Tautalatasi Jr. (born March 24, 1962) is a former American football running back in the National Football League for the Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Washington State University.

Lesa Mayes-Stringer

Lesa Mayes-Stringer (sometimes shown as Lesa Mayers-Stringer, born Lesa Mayes on May 13, 1968) is a Canadian bobsledder who competed from 1999 to 2009. Lesa had 5 top 10 World Cup finishes in 2004/2005 season. Later, that season, she finished 11th in the two-woman event at the 2005 FIBT World Championships in Calgary. She is now competing for France.

A native of North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Stringer married in 1994 and sat out the 2002-03 World Cup season on a maternity leave. Prior to her role in bobsleigh, Mayes-Stringer competed in track and field in the heptathlon and the 100 m hurdles.

She earned her degree in history from York University and holds a teaching certificate from Simon Fraser University in British Columbia.

In 2007, Lesa Mayes-Stringer began living and training in France. She was unable to compete that year because she had to settle. In 2008, she recruited French athletes to help establish and build a French bobsleigh program. The team qualified for the 2009–2010 World Cup and is on track to compete in the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games.

She is the younger sister of former professional football player Rueben Mayes.

Mayes

Mayes is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Adrian Mayes (born 1980), American football player

Alan Mayes (born 1953), English footballer

Bernard Mayes (1929–2014), British-American lecturer and author

Clifford Mayes (born 1953), American professor of education

Clyde Mayes (born 1953), American professional basketball player

Colin Mayes (born 1948), Canadian politician

Derrick Mayes (born 1974), American football player

Frances Mayes (born 1940), American university professor, poet, memoirist, essayist, and novelist

Ian Mayes, British journalist and editor

Jeff Mayes (born 1971), American politician

Joel B. Mayes (died 1891), Chief of the Cherokee Nation

Johnny Mayes (born 1947), Australian rugby league player

Richard Mayes (1922–2006), English stage and television actor

Ron Mayes (born 1954), American educator and author

Rueben Mayes (born 1963), Canadian football player

Rufus Mayes (born 1947), American football player

Samuel Houston Mayes (1845–1927), Chief of the Cherokee Nation from 1895 to 1899

Sean Mayes (1949–1995), English rock musician and author

Wendell Wise Mayes, Jr. (born 1924), American radio and cable television executive

William Mayes, Jr., prominent pirate, proprietor of White Horse Tavern (Rhode Island)

William Edward Mayes (1861–1952), English painter

National Football League Rookie of the Year Award

Various entities present a National Football League Rookie of the Year Award each season to the top rookie(s) in the National Football League (NFL). The NFL considers the rookie of the year awards by the Associated Press (AP) to be its official honor. The AP awards and Pepsi's rookie of the year award are presented each year at the NFL Honors.

North Battleford Comprehensive High School

North Battleford Comprehensive High School (NBCHS) is one of three high schools in the city of North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada. NBCHS has a student body of around 1200 students, and a faculty of approximately 50 teachers.

Pac-12 Conference football individual awards

Coaches of the Pac-12 Conference bestow the following awards at the end of each football season. The conference was founded in its current form as the Athletic Association of Western Universities in 1959, but traces its roots to the Pacific Coast Conference, founded in 1915. The conference name changed to Pacific-8 Conference (Pac-8) in 1968 and Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) in 1978. The conference's 2011 expansion to 12 members saw the conference formally renamed as the Pac-12 Conference.

Reuben

Reuben is a Biblical male first name:

Reuben (son of Jacob).The Portuguese version takes the form Rúben, in Spanish Rubén, in Catalan Rubèn and in Dutch and Armenian Ruben and Rupen / Roupen in Western Armenian.

Washington State Cougars football statistical leaders

The Washington State Cougars football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Washington State Cougars football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, Single season and career leaders. The Cougars represent Washington State University in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although Washington State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1894, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1951. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Cougars have played in seven bowl games since this decision, giving players in those seasons an extra game to accumulate statistics.

Since Mike Leach took over as head coach in 2012, the Cougars have run a high-octane air raid offense, allowing quarterbacks and wide receivers to rack up many yards and touchdowns. Most notable among these is Connor Halliday, who set an FBS single-game record (since tied) by passing for 734 yards in a 60–59 loss to California in 2014.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Overall (1975–1982)
Offensive (1983–present)
Defensive (1983–present)
Freshman (1999–2008)
Freshman Offensive (2009–present)
Freshman Defensive (2009–present)
Offense
Defense
Special teams

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